Ivydene Gardens Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery:
Annual - Annuals for Very Rich Soil and
List of Biennials used in 1916

Ivydene Gardens Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery:
Annual - Annuals for Very Rich Soil

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour

Sun Aspect of Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months

with row in each month that it flowers in that colour in
STAGE 4A
12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
/

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour


with row in relevant pages that it has foliage of that colour in
STAGE 4B
12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

or
Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

 

with data for rows in
STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY and
STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Pages

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with links to
STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2, 3
and
STAGE 3
ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2
pages
 

Comments

Adjacent Planting

Plant Associations

It is sad to reflect that in England so few gardens open to the public label their plants or label them so that the label is visible when that plant is in flower, so that visitors can identify; and then later locate and purchase that plant.

Few mail-order nurseries provide the detail as shown in my rose or heather galleries.

If you want to sell a product, it is best to display it. When I sold my Transit van, I removed its signage, cleaned it and took photos of the inside and outside before putting them onto an advert in Autotrader amongst more than 2000 other Transit vans - it was sold in 20 minutes.

If mail-order nurseries could put photos to the same complexity from start of the year to its end with the different foliage colours and stages of flowering on Wikimedia Commons, then the world could view the plant before buying it, and idiots like me would have valid material to work with.

I have been in the trade (until ill health forced my Sole Trader retirement in 2013) working in designing, constructing and maintaining private gardens for decades and since 2005 when this site was started, I have asked any nursery in the world to supply photos. R.V. Roger in Yorkshire allowed me to use his photos from his website in 2007 and when I got a camera to spend 5 days in July 2014 at my expense taking photos of his roses growing in his nursery field, whilst his staff was propagating them. I gave him a copy of those photos.

Consolida ambigua (Consolida ajacis, Larkspur)

Supplier of Consolida ambigua (now known as Consolida ajacis, Rocket Larkspur)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Excellent cut flower for fresh or dried arrangements.

Easily grown from seed in loose, moderately rich, consistently moist, well-drained soils in full sun.

 

consolidacfloajaciswikimediacommons

Consolida ajacis at the Huntington Library & Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California, USA. By Stickpen (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Helianthus annuus (Common Sunflower, Annual Sunflower, Sunflowers)
 

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

The flower head is comprised of outer yellow ray florets, which serve to attract pollinators, and inner brownish disc florets which are fertile.

Full Sun

Jul-Aug

36-120 x 18-36
(90-300 x 45-90)

Moist, well-drained

Ann

Sunflower is pollinated by bees and some farmers place bee colonies in sunflower fields which produce honey as a by-product.

Sunflower meal is sometimes used as a substitute for wheat flour in the baking of bread and cakes for human consumption. The indigenous people of North America have a long tradition of using ground sunflower seeds to make bread-like products.

Grow wild Helianthus in a sunny location in somewhat fertile well-drained soil.

Easy to grow, branching habit so great for cut flowers. A charming flower for the youngsters to have a go at growing.

Removal of browned and tattered plants from the garden after bloom may improve the appearance of the landscape, but is a great disappointment to local bird populations that love to feed on the seeds.

Garden Uses
Specimen or mass. Borders, cottage gardens, bird gardens, wildflower or native plant gardens. Large varieties for border rears or backgrounds. Dwarf varieties for beds, border fronts or containers.

helianthuscforannuuswikimediacommons

Helianthus annuus, Asteraceae, Sonnenblume, Habitus; Stutensee, Germany. The ripe fruits are used in homeopathy as remedy: Helianthus annuus (Helia.). By H. Zell, via Wikimedia Commons

Linum grandiflorum (Flowering Flax, Adenolinum grandiflorum)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

It may be safely accounted as one of the easiest, showiest and most beautiful of all hardy annuals. From early summer to autumn, brilliant blood-red flowers with a beautiful satin sheen are produced.

 

linumcflograndiflorumwikimediacommons

Scarlet Flax (Linum grandiflorum) growing in Mason, New Hampshire garden. By Rob Duval via Wikimedia Commons

Venidium fastuosum (Monarch-of-the-veldt, African daisy)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Cape Daisy flowers are excellent for cutting. Mix Cape Daisy flowers into the border or plant around the vegetable garden, as they are very attractive to beneficial insects and pollinators.

Flowers close at night; prefers rich soil; thrives in hot, dry conditions.

 

venidiumcflofastuosumwikimediacommons

Venidium fastuosum, Cape daisy, 日本語: ベニジウム(別名:ジャノメギク) By Laitche, via Wikimedia Commons

Heliotropium arborescens (Cherry Pie, Mary Fox, White Queen)

Supplier of Heliotrope Fragrant Delight

Supplier of Heliotrope 'Midnight Sky'

 

 

 

 

 

Fragrant; prefers rich soil, requires little care.

Temperate perennials usually grown as annuals and growing a heliotrope plant will be an additional pleasure for those who live in places with hot, dry summers. They are drought and heat tolerant and deer hate them. Today, heliotrope flowers come in varieties of white, purple and pale lavender.


All parts of the plant are poisonous to humans and animals including dogs if ingested. So keep them away from children and pets.

 

heliotropiumcflos2arborescenswikimediacommons

Heliotropium arborescens

日本語: キダチルリソウ,ニオイムラサキ,ヘリオトロープ

Place:Osaka Prefectural Flower Garden,Osaka,Japan. By I, KENPEI via Wikimedia Commons

Phlox drummondii (Annual Phlox)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Phlox drummondii 'Dwarf Beauty Mixed'. It produces large solid heads of bright rich colours on dwarf bushy plants.

P. drummondii is often used as an ornamental plant. The flowers have a wide range of colours from white and cream through pinks, lilacs, roses, purples and reds, to almost black.

Deadhead; thrives in rich, well-drained soil; give extra water in dry periods.

 

phloxcflosdrummondiiwikimediacommons

Phlox drummondii Photographed at the Queen Sirikit Botanic Garden (Chiang Mai Province, Thailand) in March. This photo is from Gardenology.org and is available under CC-BY-SA 3.0 license. If you use it, please include attribution to Gardenology.org, with a link if the media allows it. By Raffi Kojian, via Wikimedia Commons

Salvia farinacea
(Blue salvia, Blue Sage, Mealycup sage)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Uses

Beds and Borders,
Container,
Cut Flower,
Ground Covers,
Indoor Plant,

Suitable as Annual

Prefers rich soil in full sun; drought tolerant, but fares better w/regular watering during prolonged dry periods.

 

salviacflosfarinaceawikimediacommons

Salvia farinacea. By Rob Hille via Wikimedia Commons

Cleome hassleriana (Spider flower)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Easily grown in average, dry to medium, well-drained soils in full sun. Tolerates light shade. Best with consistent watering during the growing season, but once established, plants will tolerate some drought.

Self-sows; prefers rich soil, but tolerates wide range of soil conditions; drought tolerant.

 

cleomecforhasslerianawikimediacommons

The inflorescence of cultivated Cleome hassleriana. Moscow region, Russia.. By Bff, via Wikimedia Commons

Verbena

Supplier

 

 

 

 

1343 results from Royal Horticultural Society.

Prefers rich, sandy soil; do not overwater; deadhead.

Verbena bonariensis - Tall, narrow, sparsely-leafed stems bear flattened heads of bright lavender-purple flowers that provide useful height in a herbaceous border. This is a short-lived perennial, and because it is borderline hardy, plants may be damaged by winter frosts. This may be avoided by leaving the dead stalks until spring, when new growth is evident, before cutting them back. A protective mulch should be added around them in the autumn with leaf mould or compost. They do, however, self-seed liberally and resulting seedlings are stronger and more drought-tolerant than those that are transplanted. This is a superb butterfly plant, rivalling even buddleja. The Royal Horticultural Society have given it the Award of Garden Merit.

Looks good with:

  • Foeniculum vulgare 'Purpureum'
  • Stipa gigantea

 

verbenacflobonariensiswikimediacommons

Photograph of Verbena bonariensis, taken in Machida city, Tokyo, Japan. Croped & resized. By Sphl, via Wikimedia Commons

Hibiscus moscheutos (Swamp Rosemallow, Common Rose Mallow)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

This shrublike herbaceous perennial is a vigorous grower with large, glabrous leaves and 4-5" wide flowers that range from pink to white. The flowers last only for one day, but they appear consistently until the end of the season. They can be used in the border, as a temporary hedge or grown in large containers. This plant needs rich soils, consistant moisture and full sun. Plant in areas that remain moist such as the banks of a stream or pond, shrub beds or entranceways for most dramatic effect.

 

hibiscuscflomoscheutoswikimediacommons

Hibiscus moscheutos. By Kurt Stüber, via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment with the UMass Extension Greenhouse Crops and Floriculture Team which supports the greenhouse industry with research and information on environmentally safe production practices and marketing. The greenhouse industry is one of the largest production agriculture moneymakers in Massachusetts's, valued at $78 million dollars. There are over 1000 commercial greenhouse and flower producing operations growing potted plants, perennials, bedding plants and cut flowers. It has produced the following:-

Soil Fertility for Field-grown Cut Flowers
Field production of cut flowers, particularly annuals, requires many of the same soil fertility management practices as production of vegetables and other outdoor crops. The main goal is to maintain proper fertility to produce a good yield of high quality flowers for summer sales. Another goal is to maintain soil health and avoid environmental contamination by using fertilizers responsibly.

Although you are not in the Greenhouse Industry, it is worth your while to read the following, so that you may understand what happens in the soil as you add fertilizer or lime or cover crops in different years depending on the results of soil tests in your garden. If you only put annuals into new compost each year, then putting that used compost in your garden will also have an effect - I have highlighted some of the information below as being important.

 

Major Nutrients
Nitrogen
. Adequate nitrogen (N) is critical for cut flower production. A N deficiency will result in poor plant growth, a reduction in flower yield, and the appearance of foliar chlorosis. Too much N may result in too much vegetative growth, cause weak stems, and delay flowering.
Nitrogen is the most difficult nutrient to manage because it is required in the greatest amount by plants and is easily lost from the soil by leaching or as a gas. For these reasons N fertilizer must be applied each year to maintain adequate levels for production. Leaching of N as nitrate (NO3) can be a serious problem not only as a way of losing N for the crop, but also because it can pollute groundwater and surface bodies of water. Too much N fertilizer, high rainfall or excess irrigation, and sandy soil are all factors favoring NO3 leaching.
Nitrogen fertilization also effects soil pH. Over time the continuous use of ammonium or urea fertilizers lowers the pH of the soil. The acidity is created because ammonium or urea are quickly converted to NO3 by soil bacteria and acidity is a byproduct of this process. Neutralizing the acidity generated by N fertilizers is one of the reasons for using limestone.

 

Phosphorus. The effects of phosphorus (P) on cut flower production are less obvious than the effects of N. A P deficiency may result in smaller plants and shorter flowering stems, but foliar symptoms may not be apparent. Phosphorus is often said to be needed for flowering, but the exact effects of P on cut flower crops has not been studied.
Less P than N is needed by plants and P is more stable than N in the soil. Some agricultural soils in Massachusetts test "very high" or "excess" in P because of the regular use of NPK fertilizers over many years. Generally, the potential harm caused by high P is not to the plants, but to the environment. Too much P can lead to runoff to surface bodies of water. This encourages the growth of too much algae and other aquatic plants which leads to a serious decline in water quality. Nutrients should be applied based on need as determined by a soil test. Unlike N, an application of P may not be needed every year.
Superphosphate is a water-soluble P fertilizer and is best used to correct a low P condition before planting. Rock phosphate is not water-soluble and it is best used for the long-term maintenance of P in the soil.

 

Potassium. Potassium (K) deficiency causes marginal chlorosis and burning on the lower leaves first. Unless the deficiency is very serious it may not effect the leaves on the flowering stems, but it could reduce overall yield. Potassium deficiency is most likely to occur on sandy soils low in clay and organic matter. Soils lacking in clay and/or organic matter have a low cation exchange capacity (CEC) and have little ability to retain the cations (i.e., positively-charged ions) such as K, as well as calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg).
It may not be necessary to apply K fertilizer to some clay soils and soils high in organic matter every year. To the author's knowledge there is no harm to the environment from excess K and no direct harm of high K to most plants. However, too much K can depress the uptake of Ca and Mg, sometimes to the point that deficiency symptoms of these elements develop.

 

Soil Testing

A yearly soil test for pH and nutrient levels should be made in either the fall or spring Since P, K, Ca and Mg are fairly stable in the soil a fall test gives a good reading on the status of these elements for next spring. If needed, limestone or rock phosphate can be applied in the fall giving these materials a head start in reacting with the soil before spring. Since the status of N is very changeable, a spring test or one right before N application is best.
Soil should be collected from about 10 randomly selected spots in the cut flower field and from a depth of about 6 to 8". The 10 subsamples should be mixed together into one sample to send to the UMass Soil and Plant Tissue Testing Laboratory.

 

Lime Requirement
Checking pH and adjusting it by liming is important in managing soil fertility. The general acceptable pH range for flower crops is 5.5 to 7.0, but some plants may have particular optimum pH levels for best performance. pH affects the availability of trace elements and the activity of many beneficial soil microorganisms. Phosphorus availability is highest between pH 6 and 7, so liming an acid soil may help free some plant-available P.
In addition to raising the pH of acid soils limestone serves as fertilizer for Ca and Mg. As a soil becomes acid it also supplies less and less Ca and Mg. Regular use of N fertilizers hastens the formation of acid soil as discussed earlier. Use finely ground dolomitic limestone or calcitic limestone with 5-10% Mg to get both elements.

Ideally pH should be checked once a year either in the fall or the spring. If the pH is not in the desired range a lime requirement test (buffer pH) can be rim to determine how much lime is needed. These tests take into account the soil texture- sandy soils need much less limestone to cause a pH change than soils high in clay or organic matter.

 

Fertilizing Cut Flowers
The goal of fertilizing outdoor cut flowers is to provide adequate levels of nutrients for vegetative growth early in development, strong stems, and a good yield of flowers.
Annuals. Annual species are started from either seed or transplants. Germinating seeds and young seedlings are very sensitive to fertilizer injury so the amount of fertilizer put on initially should be very small. Starter fertilizer should be applied at a rate of about ¼ - ½ lb. of actual N/1000 sq. ft. at seeding either by broadcasting or banding. Bands should be placed about 2" below and to the sides of the seeds. More fertilizer would be applied later after the young plants are well established.
If annual transplants are used to start the crop about 20-30% of the total N requirement can be applied shortly before planting assuming the transplants are healthy and have been hardened-off. Another one-third of the total should be applied as a sidedress when the transplants are about 8-10" tall. The final application should be made with about 4-6 weeks of harvest left to go.
Can one application of N fertilizer at transplanting grow a good crop? "Yes" is probably the answer in many cases. However, the split application method is a more efficient means of applying N fertilizer in fields receiving heavy irrigation or rainfall or that have sandy, well-drained soil. Split application provides a more consistent supply of nutrients than one large application at planting.

Perennials. In general fertilizer is applied to encourage shoot development when growth begins in the spring. Approximate amount of limestone need to change soil pH and to support the flowers as they develop. After flowering or harvest most perennials continue to grow building the root system and expanding the crown or other overwintering structures. An additional application of fertilizer is needed to support preparations for winter. So the total fertilizer requirement might be divided as follows: a small application in the spring as growth begins, a sidedress application as the plants approach flowering, and another application after harvesting ends.

Rates of application. In his book on field grown cut flowers, Stevens (1998) recommends fertilizer be applied at 1 to 2 lbs. actual N per 1000 sq. ft. for a diverse group of annuals and perennials. At the 2 lb. rate this would be 20 lb. of 10-10-10 fertilizer. Some large, and fast-growing annuals like sunflower may need more and it can be added as a sidedress if necessary.
As in greenhouse practice complete NPK fertilizers are applied to outdoor cuts according to the N requirement. Ideally, however, P and K should only be applied if their need is indicated by a soil test. So rather than using 10-10-10 a grower could use single element carriers such as ammonium nitrate, superphosphate, and potassium chloride to fulfill the exact needs according to a soil test.

 

Cover crops
Once a cut flower crop has been harvested there may be some growing time left in the late summer and early fall. Rather than leaving the soil fallow this would be a good time to grow a cover crop. Cover crops absorb residual nutrients left in the soil, add organic matter, may add N (legume), and may help protect the soil over winter. "

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Petunia x hybrida (Petunia)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Petunia x hybrida 'Purple Velvet' F1 Hybrid. Can also be planted in borders where it will make very effective ground cover.

Deadhead; prefers rich, sandy soil

 

petuniacflohybridawikimediacommons

Petunia x hybrida. By Jerzy Opioła, via Wikimedia Commons

Begonia x semperflorens (Wax begonia)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Dwarf varieties grow to 6-8” tall and taller varieties grow to 10-12” tall. Mass in beds or borders. Edgings. Containers and window boxes.

Performs well in sun or shade; tolerates variety of soil conditions, but prefers rich, well-drained soil.

 

begoniacflossemperflorenswikimediacommons1a

Begonia x semperflorens. Found in Rīga town, Latvia. By AfroBrazilian, via Wikimedia Commons

Campanula medium (Canterbury Bells)

Supplier

 

 

 

 

 

Plant them in a cluster of all blue or mix them in with other flowers for a show of color. Sow Canterbury Bells flower seeds indoors 6 - 10 weeks before your region's last frost date. Press the Campanula seeds into the soil, but do not cover them. The flower seed germinates in 14 - 21 days. Transplant the seedlings outdoors in rich, well-drained soil that has plenty of compost or sphagnum peat moss worked in. Canterbury Bells need a site in full sun to light shade. Canterbury Bells care includes fertilizing every other month during the growing season for best height and heaviest bloom. These taller Campanula plants may need support to keep flowers upright. Cut Canterbury Bells back after flowering.

 

campanulacflomediumwikimediacommons1

Campanula medium By JeLuf, via Wikimedia Commons

Gerbera jamesonii (Barberton Daisy, Transvaal daisy)

Supplier of Gerbera jamesonii 'T&M Mixed' F2 Hybrid

 

 

 

 

 

Gerbera jamesonii 'T&M Mixed' F2 Hybrid - Fast growing and early to flower, this special T&M blend of large- bloomed gerbera make spectacular house plants. Perfect for the patio in summer and a sunny windowsill or glasshouse during the cooler months, they'll provide months of vibrant colour. Makes excellent cut flowers. Height: 30-40cm (12-16").
Ideal For: patio, greenhouse, conservatory, cut flower garden
Flowering Period: June, July, August, September
Sowing Months: February, March
Position: full sun

Grow in average to organically rich, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun.

 

gerberacflojamesoniiwikimediacommons

File:Gerbera jamesonii-1.JPG reidsh-pink flower several long slender ray florets. By Varun Pabrai, via Wikimedia Commons

Impatiens balsamina (Garden Balsam, Rose Balsam)

Supplier of mixed flower colours from USA and the UK

Supplier of Impatiens balsamina, 'Tom Thumb' Extra Dwarf Mixed being only 11 inches (28 cms) high.

 

 

 

 

 

It is easily grown in evenly moist, organically rich, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. it has been eclipsed in popularity in recent years by its close relative, the flat-flowered garden impatiens (Impatiens walleriana). Use in Shady beds, borders, woodland gardens, Edging along walks or paths and in Containers.

Balsam germinates quickly in just 10 - 14 days, and it is not too fussy about soil, but a sandy loam works very well.

 

impatienscforbalsaminawikimediacommons

Impatiens balsamina. By Uleli, via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Alphabetical list of the best Annuals and Biennials in 1916" from Part II of Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and republished by Forgotten Books in 2012 (Forgotten Books is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have 372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or purchase in print.):-

Biennial

Height in inches (cms)

Flower Colour

Flowering Months

Description

 

Althaea rosea (Alcea rosea, Hollyhock, Common Hollyhock)

Supplier in UK
Supplier in USA

72-96 x 12-24
(180-240 x 30-60)

The flowers are a range of colours from white to dark red, including pink, yellow and orange.

Jun-Aug

Althaea rosea is the grand Hollyhock so well known in gardens; both the single and double are among the very finest border plants. The variety Althaea ficifolia (Antwerp Hollyhock), is rather slimmer and more graceful in growth; of this the white and pale yellow forms are the best. Hollyhocks are gross feeders, thriving with any kind of strong manure. It should be dug in deep down for the roots to find gradually; when coming into flower they should also have frequent applications of liquid manure. They are extremely liable to the attack of the mallow fungus Puccinia malvacearum. When the pest appears they should be frequently sprayed with a full pink-coloured solution of permanganate of potash or 1 of the many ready-made fungicides. In strong loamy or chalky soils they are generally immune. Hollyhocks are really perennials, but they are commonly grown as biennials.

alceacfloroseanigrawikimediacommons1

Flower of Alcea rosea 'nigra', in botanical garden in Uppsala, Sweden by By Øystein Hellesøe Brekke (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Anchusa italica (Anchusa azurea, Garden Anchusa, Italian Bugloss)

36-60 (90-150)

Blue flowers

Jun-Jul

A perennial, but best treated as a biennial. The finest are the Dropmore varieties; the one named Opal is of a very beautiful, rather pale, but extremely pure blue colour. They flower throughout June and July. To keep this fine plant true, it must be propagated by root cuttings made in august.

Double Daisy (Bellis perennis, Common Daisy, Lawn Daisy, English Daisy, Daisy is a member of the Wildflower Daisy: Cudweeds Family)

6 (15)

White, crimson, pink

Feb-May

The large Double Daisies have been much improved of late. They are in 3 distinct colourings of white, crimson, and pink. They are more or less perennial, but as they are apt to deteriorate are best treated as biennials, sown outdoors in June and transplanted in autumn. Old plants can be divided, but it is best to sow afresh with seed from a good house.
Bellis is Latin for "pretty" and perennis is Latin for "everlasting". The name "daisy" is considered a corruption of "day's eye", because the whole head closes at night and opens in the morning. Chaucer called it "eye of the day". In Medieval times, Bellis perennis or the English Daisy was commonly known as "Mary's Rose". The English Daisy is also considered to be a flower of children and innocence.

Campanula medium (Canterbury Bells)

24-36 (60-90)

Purple, pink and white

Jun-Aug

One of the best of summer flowers, 24-36 inches (60-90cms) high; coloured purple in several shades, pink and white. There double varieties, but in these the pretty bell is confused and disfigured by the tight, crumpled mass inside; the single and the calycanthema (Cup and Saucer) forms are the best. Sow in a warm place in the open about the second week of May; prick out, for preference in slight shade, and keep watered, and put out where they are to flower in early autumn. They are useful in pots, and may be potted from the open ground even when they are showing bloom.

Campanula pyramidalis (Chimney Bellflower)

60-84 (150-210)

Shades of Blue and White

May-Jul

A short-lived perennial, but usually treated as a biennial. It forms great columns of bloom 60-84 inches (150-210 cms) high in late summer and autumn. It may be grown out of doors, but is finest when well cultivated in pots. Sow in June in the open. It is a grand plant for the conservatory. Both the type-coloured purple and the white should be grown.
1 of top 10 showstopper plants for borders.

Cheiranthus cheiri (Erisimum cheiri, Wallflower)

9-24 (22.5-60

Yellow, orange, red, maroon, purple, brown, white and cream

Apr-Jun

Wallflowers are so well known that they need not be described. There are many garden varieties, but among the best are some good strain of Blood Red and the shorter kind named Vulcan, of intense red-brown colour and bushy habit. The old Purple should not be neglected, it is better in some combinations of plants than the redder variety obtained from it, named Ruby Gem; Fire King is a gorgeous colour and Yellow Phoenix a fine yellow. Primrose Dame is a pretty pale yellow; other colourings of the single Wallflowers will be found in trade lists. The early Paris kinds are valuable. The double German kinds, especially those of full and pale yellow colourings, are extremely desirable in the spring garden; their massive spikes are of fine appearance and they last longer than any other spring flower. Wallflowers should be sown out of doors in May, preferably in rather poor soil trodden firm; this keeps the plants compact and of strong constitution. They are best put out in any damp weather in July if the place for spring flowers is dedicated to them only, but if they have to follow bedding plants they must wait till October or November. In any case they must not be allowed to grow large and rank before they are put in the places where they are to bloom.
It associates well in bedding schemes with other spring flowers such as tulips and forget-me-nots. Wild wallflower may be established easily on walls or old roofs if seed is sown ideally in late summer, in situ, and covered with a little soil.

 

Planting Schemes using Annuals

The main point about annuals is that they are shortlived. Even the most stalwart, enduring individuals are done after a few months; few even last for more than half a summer and many flower and die within a few weeks. Effective planting, therefore, depends on rotation, careful timing, large numbers and bold placing.
Since they seed copiously and since many adopt the role of biennials and will survive a winter, having germinated in the autumn, their short lives are often compensated for by rapid reproduction and a sustained succession. Flowering times can also be brought forward by artificial sowing, pre-season, in trays or cells and planting out the young plants.
Tender annuals will not sustain their colonies outdoors, where winter frost is expected, but hardy species can be left to their own devices and should ensure colour through much of the growing season.
Annuals as blenders - Although they work very well in their own company, the most common use of annuals is as gap fillers, or to accompany other, more permanent plants in mixed schemes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 1
PAGES

Site Map

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY PAGES Links to pages in Table alongside on the left with Garden Design Topic Pages

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Plant Type
 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 with its Cultivation Requirements

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border
1
, 2

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime 1, 2

Alpines and Walls
Dry Sunny Walls 1a, b
Tops of Walls 2a, b
Dry Shady and Conifers 3a, b

Alpines and
Paving
1
, 2

Sink and Trough gardens
1
, 2

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion River-bank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)
1
, 2

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Water-side Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond
1
, 2

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------



 

 

ANY PLANT TYPE for
Cut Flowers in
January 1, 2
February
March 1, 2
April
May 1, 2
June 1, 2
July 1, 2
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Con-tainers

Cut Flowers
1
, 2, 3 Ever-lasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attract-ing bene-ficial insects
1
, 2

Scent / Fra-grance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas and Colour Schemes with Annuals
1
, 2

Low-Growing Annuals
1
, 2

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers and Cut Flowers
Page
1
, 2, 3

White Flowers
1
, 2

Yellow or Orange Flowers
1
, 2

Dec-orative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade
1
, 2

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attract-ive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elabo-rated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screen-ing

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

 

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens
1
, 2

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Con-tainers with Biennials for Pots in Green-house / Con-servatory

Bene-ficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explan-ation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
Dec-ember
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for Sep-tember
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes
1
, 2

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs natural-ised in Grass

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Apr-May
Jun-Aug 1, 2, 3, 4

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Any Plant Type Blooming in Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Wood-land Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achi-menes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Aris-aemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomar-eas, Calad-iums

Clivias,
Colo-casias, Crinums, Cyclam-ens, Cyrt-anthuses, Euchar-ises, Urceo-charis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachen-alias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone 1, 1a

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloom-eria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calo-chorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Col-chicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Mon-tbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Ery-thrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Gal-anthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hya-cinth, Hya-cinths in Pots,
Scilla, Pusch-kinia, Chion-odoxa, Chiono-scilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapey-rousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidan-thera, Albuca, Alstroe-meri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixio-lirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogal-ums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooper-ias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant each Bedding Plant with a Ground, Edging or Dot Plant for
Spring
1
, 2
or
Summer
1
, 2

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with

Any Plant Type flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1, 2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec
 

----------
Choosing the right Plant

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vege-tables

1d.
Cut
flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised
Bed
for Wheel-chair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least prot-ruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Ground-cover

1,2
Ornam-ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conserv-atory or Green-house

Large
Pots and Con-tainers
1
, 2

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1a1a1a1a1a
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salver-form

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1a1a1a1a1a
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elabo-rated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a1a1a1a1a1
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a1a1a1a1a1
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

andosacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms

 

STAGE 4A 12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Brown

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Cream

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
White

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Multi-Colou-red

1
Each Flower Diff-

1
erent Colour

 

STAGE 4B 12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
Deciduous Shrubs or Trees, Herbaceous Perennials or Bulbs- if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.
Evergreen Shrubs or Trees, Evergreen Perennials - if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.

Jan Win

Feb Win

Mar Spr

Apr Spr

May Spr

Jun Sum

Jul Sum

Aug Sum

Sep Aut

Oct Aut

Nov Aut

Dec Win

Decid
Herba

Ever-green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Black

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Bronze

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Grey

1
White

1
Silver

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Varie-gated

1

1

1

1

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Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders - was first published in 1977 and this paperback edition was published on 1 August 1994 ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-
This comprehensive book looks at scented flowers and leaves of plants from all over the world. The work has been prepared to the standards of the Index Kewensis, and is filled with the most interesting facts about the scented flora of the world.

I am using the above book from someone who took 30 years to compile it from notes made of his detailed observations of growing plants in preference to
The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8 even though this is the only major reference work on scent and scented plants which is endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society. See reasons for stopping infilling of previous Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page.

The Propagation of Alpines by Lawrence D. Hills. Published in 1950 by Faber and Faber Limited describes every method of propagation for 2,500 species. Unlike modern books published since 1980, this one states exactly what to do and is precisely what you require if you want to increase your alpines.

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design

...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants

...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens

A 1, Photos
B 1, Photos
C 1, Photos
D 1, Photos
E 1, Photos
F 1, Photos
G 1, Photos
H 1, Photos
I 1, Photos
J 1, Photos
K 1, Photos
L 1, Photos
M 1, Photos
N 1, Photos
O 1, Photos
P 1, Photos
Q 1, Photos
R 1, Photos
S 1, Photos
T 1, Photos
U 1, Photos
V 1, Photos
W 1, Photos
X 1 Photos
Y 1, Photos
Z 1 Photos
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens
Flower Shape and Plant Use of
Bedding
Bulb
Evergreen Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Rose


Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...Infill Plants *
...Infill2 Plants
...Infill3 Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...All2 Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

1

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

1

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

1

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

1

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

1

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

1

Hanging Basket

1

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

1

Pollution Barrier

1

Pond

1

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

1

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

1

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

1

Tree/Shrub for Small Garden

1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9, 10,
11,12,
13,14,
15,16,
uses of tree/ shrub

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

1

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

1

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

1

Filtering noise

1

Flower Arrange-ments

Growing Plants for the Church

1



1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9,10,
11,12,
13,14

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

1

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

1

Moist and swampy Sites

1

Nitrogen fixing plants

1

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

1

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

1

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

1

Autumn Foliage

1

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

1

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

1

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

1

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

1 Petal

1

2 Petals

1

3 Petals
irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

4 Petals
aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

5 Petals
anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Above 5
anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bowls
 

1

Cups and Saucers
euphorbiacflo1wallichiigarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Globes
paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Goblets and Chalices
paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Trumpets
acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Funnels
stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bells
digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Thimbles
fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Urns
ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Salverform

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Standards, Wings and Keels
lathyrusflotvernus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Discs and Florets
brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pin-Cushions
echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Tufts
centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Cushion
androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Umbel
agapanthuscflos1campanulatusalbidusgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Buttons
argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pompoms
armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Plumes and Tails
astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

1

Spheres, Domes (Clusters), Plates and Drumsticks
androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
ccolumnarshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Oval
covalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Rounded or Spherical
croundedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Flattened Spherical
cflattenedsphericalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
cnarrowconicalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
cbroadpyramidalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped

ceggshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Ovoid
cbroadovoidshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
cnarrowvaseshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
cfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
cbroadfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Weeping
cnarrowweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Weeping
cbroadweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Palm

1

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

1

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

1

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

1

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

STAGE 1
GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark
1
, 2, 3

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2

Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2

Scented Aquatic Plants
1


Plants with Scented Fruits
1


Plants with Scented Roots
1
, 2

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood
1


Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums
1


Scented Cacti and Succulents
1


Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell
1
, 2
 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 3

Fan-trained Shape
fantrainedshape2a1a1a

From Rhododendrons, boxwood, azaleas, clematis, novelties, bay trees, hardy plants, evergreens : novelties bulbs, cannas novelties, palms, araucarias, ferns, vines, orchids, flowering shrubs, ornamental grasses and trees book, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club.
Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN
13:978
0 00 719312 7, provides many of the plants for the pages in these Galleries.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

Indoor Bulb
Growing by
Edward Pearson
. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in
Window-boxes.

Colour All The
Year In My Garden
: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour
in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book
from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.
The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by
Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to
Bulbs by Patrick
M. Synge
. ISBN
0 00 214016-0
First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and
republished by Forgotten Books in 2012
(Forgotten Books
is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have
372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or
purchase in print.).

Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated
Gardening Encyclopedia
by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation.

Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by
Daily Express Publication,
reprinted 1941
for the individual
cultivar names with evergreen/
deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Tree and Shrubs in Garden Design -

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Clay Soils (neutral to slightly acid)

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Dry Acid Soils

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Shallow Soil over Chalk

Trees and Shrubs tolerant of both extreme Acidity and Alkalinity

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Damp Sites

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Industrial Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Cold Exposed Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Seaside Areas

Shrubs suitable for Heavy Shade

Shrubs and Climbers suitable for NORTH- and EAST-facing Walls

Shrubs suitable for Ground Cover

Trees of Pendulous Habit

Trees and Shrubs of Upright or Fastigiate Habit

Trees and Shrubs with Ornamental Bark or Twigs

Trees and Shrubs with Bold Foliage

Trees and Shrubs for Autumn Colour

Trees and Shrubs with Red or Purple Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Golden or Yellow Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Grey or Silver Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Variegated Foliage

Trees and Shrubs bearing Ornamental Fruit

Trees and Shrubs with Fragrant or Scented Flowers

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Foliage

Flowering Trees and Shrubs for Every Month:-
Jan
, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec

The following table shows the linkages for the information about the plants
described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening in The Gardeners' Golden Treasury, revised by A. G. L Hellyer F.L.S, Editor of 'Amateur Gardening', (thirty-first impression of original published in 1895) was published in 1960 by W. H. & L. Collingridge Limited,
between:-

  • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery (in this Table) and Stage 1 Fragrant Plants (in Table on left), then
  • Stage 2 - 3 Infill Plants Index Galleries (in Table on right), then
  • Stage 3a - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2 (in this Table)
  • Stage 3b - All2 Plants Index Gallery for Alpines without a Garden for your health and productivity (in this Table)
  • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right)
  • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right) with
    column for Deciduous / Herbaceous plants with the same foliage colour during their growing season and
    column for Evergreen plants with the same foliage colour during the entire year
  • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery (in Table on left)
  • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery (in Table on left)

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
It would be useful if when you decide to change your garden that you use a uniform garden style throughout your garden and the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY aims to provide pointers.
The new pages (April 2016) in the gallery will have a suitable list of plants on each page (as that plant gets further detailed in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY), then each row containing that plant name in the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY will also be updated. I aim to input details of plants starting with A in alphabetical order to Z.

Private Garden Design:-
What is your Budget and What are the purposes for your garden?
Designing for a purpose: Areas which require answers before answering your Designing for a Purpose Questionaire.
Then, do the Site Survey with Photographs, before putting the Current Garden Design on paper or in your computer.
Using the Broad Design elements of Scale, which Garden Style to use:-
Low Maintenance Garden Style, Cottage Garden Style, Wildlife Garden Style or Japanese Garden Style and the
Hard and Soft Landscaping elements, create the Broad Proposed Design. Then, the Detailed Design of each Hard Landscaping item followed by the Soft Landscaping elements: The Soil, changing the Microclimate; and the
Plant Selection is influenced by the Colour Wheel, with Plant Quantities determined by time to establish versus width between plants and Companion Planting will provide helpful neighbouring plants
or
Click on text in cells below to jump to that page describing that data
.

 


Container

Gardening at my work-place

 

<----

 

Yes
|
v


Do you want to garden and grow plants?

 

No

Cannot be bothered.
If you wish to improve your productivity and health, then, plant an Alpine Pan in your work area or at home using the information within Alpines without a Garden by Lawrence D. Hills, using these pages:-


Potted
House-plant


<----
|
|
v


No
Garden

At Home with Gard-ening Area


Yes


---->

Balcony Garden or Roof Garden


Yes
---->

Grow flowers for flower arranging and vegetables on Balcony Garden or Roof Garden

Pan Plant Back-grou-nd Colour

STAGE 3b
ALL2 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

|
v


Conservatory Gardening

|
<--
|

 

|
No
-->

Outside Garden
|
v

Pan, Trough and Window-Box Odds and Sods
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14,
15

The beginner's dozen for the small pan

Plants for the pan gar-den


Stovehouse for Tropical Plants

|
<--

An extra dozen for the larger pan

Kinds of Pan Plants that may be split up and tucked in Corners and Crevices

|
|
v

Miniature trees and shrubs for pan

The leafy soil pan

The gritty soil pan

The Limy Soil Plan

Blue Flower Colour Pan Plants

Lilac, Violet and Purple Flower Colour Pan Plants

Reds, Carm-ines Flower Colour Pan Plants

Pinks Flower Colour Pan Plants

White Flower Colour Pan Plants and Bicol-ored

Yellow Flower Colour Pan Plants

Blue Flower Colour Trough Plants

Violet, Lilac and Purple Flower Colour Trough Plants

|
|
v

Reds and Carm-ines Flower Colour Trough Plants

Pinks - all shades Flower Colour Trough Plants

Yellow Flower Colour Trough Plants

White and Cream Flower Colour Trough Plants

Bi-colour-ed Flower Colour Trough Plants

Feb Flower Season Pan

Mar Flower Season Pan

Apr Flower Season Pan

May Flower Season Pan

Jun Flower Season Pan

Jul Flower Season Pan

Aug Flower Season Pan

Sep Flower Season Pan

|
|
v

Oct Flower Season Pan

Nov Flower Season Pan

Pans for Semi-shade

Pans for In-doors

Mini-ature Pot

Feb Flower Season Trough

Mar Flower Season Trough

Apr Flower Season Trough

May Flower Season Trough

Jun Flower Season Trough

Jul Flower Season Trough

Aug Flower Season Trough

Sep Flower Season Trough

|
|
v

Oct Flower Season Trough

Nov Flower Season Trough

Dec Flower Season Trough

Bulb Pan

Bulb Cover-ing Carp-eters

Trough and Window-box plants 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trough and Window-Box Background Colour

Pan Plant
Alpines without a Garden

ABC 1
Pan Plants

DEF 1
Pan Plants

GHI
Pan Plants

JKL 1
Pan Plants

|
|
v

MNO 1
Pan Plants

PQR 1
Pan Plants

STU 1
Pan Plants

V 1
Pan Plants

WXYZ 1
Pan Plants

You need to know the following:-
1. How much time per week are you prepared to look after your garden or prepared to pay someone else to do it for you?
2. How much are you are prepared to spend on creating your garden and then on its maintenance for its feeding and replacement of its plants and hard landscaping?
3. In order for you to go into your garden, there must be mystery in it, so that from any position in the house you cannot see all the garden, otherwise you will not be tempted to go out into it.
4. You must decide what garden style you are going to use THROUGHOUT the garden and make sure of using 3. the mystery in it as well.
5. What plants do you want to keep in your existing garden and incorporate into your new garden?
6. What Human Problems do you have and what Site Problems are there?

A) Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers List leads onto the
B) Bee Pollinated Bloom in Month galleries and
C) extra Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers.


<----

Human Prob-lems
v


---->

Blind,
Deaf,
in a Wheelchair, or
you cannot bend easily

 

 

 

Garden Style, which takes into account the Human Problems above

 

 

Classic Mixed Style


<----

Cottage Garden Style


<----

.
v


---->

Naturalistic Style

Formal English Garden

 

Mediterranean Style


<----

Meadow and Corn-field


<----

.
.
v


---->

Paving and Gravel inland,
Coastal Conditions near the sea, Seashore with shingle/sand

 

 

 

 

Problem Sites within your chosen Garden Style from the above

 

 

Exposure to Wind


<----

Excess Shade


<----

Exce-ssively Dry Shade


<----


<----

.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Exce-ssively Hot, Sunny and Dry Site is suitable for Drought Resistant Plants

Excessively Wet Soil - especially when caused by poor drainage

Control of Pests (Aphids, Rabbits, Deer, Mice, Mole, Snails) / Disease by Companion Planting in Garden

Whether your Heavy Clay or Light Sandy / Chalk Soil is excessively Alkaline (limy) / Acidic or not, then there is an Action Plan for you to do with your soil, which will improve its texture to make its structure into a productive soil instead of it returning to being just sand, chalk, silt or clay.


<----

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Problems caused by builders:- 1. Lack of soil on top of builders rubble in garden of just built house.
2. Clay soil of Garden slopes towards house with no drainage of this rainwater by the house wall.

In planning your beds for your garden, before the vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman planting is inserted into your soft landscaping plan, the following is useful to consider:-
1. The ground plan usually depends upon 1 or more unalterable existing features. The position of the doors of the house will dictate the positions of paths, the shortest route to the kitchen may indicate the best place for a paved area for eating and drinking out of doors, or the kept trees/shrubs may indicate what garden style is used.
2. Rules of Proportion -
A. A border should be roughly 1/2 as wide as the hedge or wall behind it.
B. The proportion of planted areas to paved or turfed areas should be 1/3 to 2/3, or a 1/4 to 3/4, not 1/2 and 1/2.
C. Within a bed or border, unless a 2-dimensional pattern on the ground is the objective, the height and bulk of the plants should be varied to avoid monotony; it is particularly important to provide strong planting, in terms of either height or bulk or both, at either end of a long bed.
D. The ground surface provides a background to the plants that is as important as the hedges, walls or fences that surround it. Grass is perhaps the most satisfying carpet to use, the cool green forming a restful antidote to the dancing colours of the flowers. Use different coloured pea-shingle inside Cedar Gravel for people in wheelchairs, or infirm in their legs or who suffer from Hay Fever.

Reasons for stopping infilling of Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page. From September 2017 will be creating the following new pages on Sense of Fragrance using Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders.
ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

After you have selected your vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman plants for each bed or border, you will need to infill with plants taking the following into account:-

 

 

 

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark 1, 2, 3
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Sandy Soil 1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves 1, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit 1, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants 1, 2
Scented Aquatic Plants.
Plants with Scented Fruits.
Plants with Scented Roots 1, 2
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.
Scented Cacti and Succulents.
Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell 1, 2

Flower Perfume Group:-
Miscellaneous Group with scents - Balm, Brandy, Cedar, Cloying, Cowslip, Cucumber, Damask Rose, Daphne, Exotic, Freesia, Fur-like, Gardenia, Hay-like, Heliotrope, Honeysuckle, Hops, Hyacinth, Incense-like, Jasmine, Laburnham, Lilac, Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette, Mint, Mossy, Muscat, Muscatel, Myrtle-like, Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg, Piercing, Primrose, Pungent, Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras, Seductive, Slight, Soft, Stephanotis, Sulphur, Starch, Sweet, Sweet-briar, Tea-rose, Treacle and Very Sweet.

Flower Perfume Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.
Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.
Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.
Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-
Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.
Honey Group.
Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint
Sulphur and
Urinous,

Leaf Perfume Group:-
Turpentine Group.
Camphor and Eucalyptus Group.
Mint Group.
Sulphur Group.
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Heavy Group.
Aromatic Group.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group.
Fruit-scented Group.
Animal-scented Group.
Honey Group.

Scent of Wood, Bark and Roots Group:-
Aromatic Group.
Turpentine Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Stale Perspiration Group.

 

Scent of Fungi Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Sulphur Group.
Aromatic Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Fruit Group.
Animal Group.
Honey Group

Sense of Sight

Emotion of
Hot /Cool; Calm / Agitated

Emotion of
Low-key / High Key


<----

.
.
.
v

Emotion of
Inviting
/ Forbidding

Emotion of Intellectual versus Emotional

Sense of Touch

Sense of Taste

Sense of Sound

 

 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 for
lists of plants of 1 plant type for 1 cultivation requirement is in Table on right

 

 

 

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
Click on Blue or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour in the
Other Plant Photo Galleries. RedPP is Red, Pink, Purple and Other is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

ABC

DEF

GHI

JKL

MNO

PQR

STU

VWX

YZ

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial,
Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Aquatic

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Annual/ Biennial

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bamboo

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bedding, 25
RHS Mixed Border Beds 75 and
Flower Shape, Flower Colour and Bedding Plant Use

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb, 746 with Use, Flower Colour/Shape of
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus and Tulip

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Climber 71 Clematis, 58 other Climbers with Use, Flower Colour and Shape

1

Blue

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Conifer

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Deciduous Shrub 43 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Deciduous Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Evergreen Perennial 104 with Use, Flower Colour, Flower Shape and Number of Petals

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Shrub 46, Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather 74 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Fern with 706 ferns
within 21 types and 41 uses

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Grass

1

1

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

Herbaceous Perennial 91,
RHS Mixed Border Beds 176 and
Peonies 46 with Flower Colour/Shape

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Herb

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Odds and Sods

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rose with 720 roses within Flower Colour, Flower Shape, Rose Petal Count and Rose Use

1

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

 

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Soft Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Sub-Shrub

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Top Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Vegetable

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Wildflower 1918 with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK
I am inserting the plants described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening into STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

Red

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Multi-colour

Cream

Mauve

Brown

Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Finally, you might be advised to check that the adjacent plants to the one you have chosen for that position in a flower bed are suitable; by checking the entry in Companion Planting - like clicking A page for checking Abies - and Pest Control page if you have a pest to control in this part of the flower bed.
Companion Planting
- A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Pest Control using Plants

 

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
The planning a Rose Garden chapter from Rose Gardens by Jane Fearnley-Whitingstall ISBN 0 7011 3344 9 and
Plant Solutions by Nigel Colborn provides information for this gallery.

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 Reference books for these galleries in Table on left

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
In addition to these 10 galleries, there are links to the Other Plant Photo Galleries in the table above like Bulb , which have plant descriptions accessed by clicking a flower thumbnail in its flower comparison page. Click the respective flower colour - like Green - to change page to that flower colour comparison page. Then, you can also choose these other plants.
It will also state the Plant Combinations for each plant from The Ulimate Visual Guide to Successful Plant Harmony - The Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations by Tony Lord ISBN 1-55209-623-8

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY
Some extra details about the Cultivation Requirements of Plant:- Outdoor /Garden Cultivation, Indoor / House Cultivation, Cool Green-house Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter, Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year, and Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

Since 2006, I have requested photos etc from the Mail-Order Nurseries in the UK and later from the rest of the World. Few nurseries have responded.
I worked for a lady, who with her husband took 35 mm slides of plants in the 1960's and 1970's. She allowed me to digitise some of her Kodachrome slides, which I have used in my website. I discovered that at least the green colour of the foliage became very much darker over that period of years to 2008, by comparing wildflower photos from her slides with digital photos supplied by a current Wildflower mail-order nursery, so I stopped creating my Foliage Galleries.
I bought myself a camera some years ago and started taking photos, some of which have been put into the website. I started taking photos of the Heathers at the Royal Horticultural Society at Wisley garden. I have displayed the Heathers foliage in closeup since their leaves are 2mm long and in macro-scale in the Heather Galleries - sometimes the foliage colour at the terminal end of the foliage stem is only a few leaves, whereas others have the same foliage colour throughout the stem. I discovered that some of the heathers did not have the correct plant label, since the flower colour did not correspond with the flower colour in the literature. I was informed that since kids have free rein, that perhaps they move the plant labels. Since, I cannot rely that the heather plant label next to the heather plant is valid, I have stopped taking photos of those heathers.
This leaves a small problem, especially since very few gardens open to the public have their plants labelled so that the public can use the data on their label to buy that named plant from a nursery or garden centre. Currently (June 2018) I insert photos from Wikimedia Commons as well as my own.
I have found the above book - which does not contain any colour plant photos. Since it had the following experts help in creating it, I have decided to use its information in these 10 galleries to help the public:-

  • T.W. Sanders Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1895.
  • A.J Macself Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1926 - both Sanders and Macself had worked entirely to the handlists published by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • A.G.L. Hellyer in this work of revision and also in checking the all-important cultural notes sought the help of experts in the various classes of plant:-
    • Mr S.A. Pearce, Assistant Curator at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew undertook the revision of those genera of plants which in this country are mainly grown under glass.
    • Mr Will Ingwersen dealt with the Rock plants,
    • Mr N. Catchpole made himself responsible for trees and shrubs;
    • Mr G.A Phillips for herbaceous plants,
    • Mrs Francis Perry for water plants,
    • Mr A.J. Macself for ferns,
    • Mr E. Cooper for orchids,
    • Mr J.S Dakers for annuals,
    • Miss Doreen Crowther for fruit and vegetables

with the aid of further information from other books, magazines and cross-checking on the internet.
In this edition of the book Sander's Encyclopaedia, the individual soil mixtures to grow plants have been retained, for it was considered that many gardeners might still wish to use them in certain circumstances. The John Innes mixtures may be substituted wherever desired. Details of these individual mixtures will be put into these galleries.