Ivydene Gardens Stage 2 - Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Climber - Climbers and Wall Shrubs for difficult, exposed positions

Ivydene Gardens Stage 2 - Infill3 Plants Index Gallery:
Climber - Climbers and Wall Shrubs for difficult, exposed positions

Botanical Plant Name

with link to
UK or
European Union
mail-order supplier for you to contact to buy this plant

Flower Colour

Sun Aspect of Full Sun,
Part Shade, Full Shade

with link to external website for photo/data

Flowering Months

with row in each month that it flowers in that colour in
STAGE 4A
12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
/

with link to
USA or
Canada
mail-order supplier

Height with Spacings or Width (W) in inches (cms)

1 inch =
2.5 cms
12 inches = 30 cms
40 inches = 100 cms

Foliage Colour


with row in relevant pages that it has foliage of that colour in
STAGE 4B
12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

or
Background Colour nearest to middle-aged leaf colour from 212 foliage colours /

followed by
Soil Moisture:-
Dry,
Moist,
Wet

with link to Australia or New Zealand mail-order supplier

 

with data for rows in
STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY and
STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Pages

Plant Type is:-

A for Aquatic
Ann for Annual / Biennial
Ba for Bamboo
Bu for Bulb
Cl for Climber
Co for Conifer
F for Fern
G for Grass
H for Herb
P for Perennial
Rh for Rhodo-dendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro for Rose
Sh for Shrub
So for Soft Fruit
To for Top Fruit
Tr for Tree
V for Vegetable
W for Wildflower

followed by:-
E for Evergreen,
D for Deciduous,
H for Herbaceous,
Alpine for being an Alpine as well as being 1 of above Plant Type /

 
Acid for Acidic,
Alk for Alkaline,
Any for AnySoil
 

with links to
STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2, 3
and
STAGE 3
ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERIES
1
, 2
pages
 

Use

Description

Pruning

Training

Average Height and spread
5 years

10 years

20 years

Problems

Similar Forms of Interest

Acer negundo is Box elder, Ashleaf maple
acercflosnegundowikimediacommons
Acer negundo male inflorescens. By Rasbak, via Wikimedia Commons

Pendent, 2-4 inches (5-10 cms) long sulphur-yellow, fluffy flowers appear before the leaves.

These flowers appear in pendant clusters in spring on separate male and female trees. Flowers are not showy. Female flowers give way to fruits (samaras) which mature in fall and often persist on the tree well into winter. Fruiting can be abundant.

Apr

360-600 x 360-600
(900-1500 x 900-1500)

Light Green turning yellow in the autumn

Fastest covering Climbers and Wall Shrubs

Tr D

Native UK tree and native American tree.

Does well on all soil types, except very dry where it may survive but may not thrive. Severely alkaline soils may cause chlorosis. Tolerates a moderately exposed aspect in full sun or light to mid shade.

Use - As a fan-trained tree for large walls, as a shade tree and as a hedge.

Foliage - Light green pinnate leaves, 6-8 inches (15-20 cms) wide and long, with three to five and sometimes up to nine leaflets. Some varieties with pink, gold or white variegation. Soft texture; slightly pendulous habit. Good yellow autumn colour.

Stem - Light to mid green, grey/green with downy texture when young. Upright at first, becoming more branching with age. Medium to fast rate of growth.

Fruit - Pendent, 3 inch (7.5 cms) long winged fruits, grey/green when young, ageing to light yellow-brown. On mature trees seed can be plentiful.

Pruning - Cut young trees hard back to within 18 inches (45 cms) of their base in spring following planting. Select resulting five to seven shoots and tie into a fan-trained shape. In subsequent years remove all side and forward growths back to 2 inch (5 cms) from their origin but maintain and encourage main branches in fan shape.

Training - Will require tying to wires or individual anchor points.

Height/spread
5 years - 120 x 120 (300 x 300)
10 years - 240 x 240 (600 x 600)
20 years - 300 x 300 (760 x 760)
Protrudes up to 36 inches (91 cms) from support.

Tolerates a minimum winter temperature of 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18 degrees Centigrade). Intolerant of shade.

Acer negundo 'Auratum'. Golden-yellow foliage from spring through summer. Slightly smaller than average.

Acer negundo californicum. A green-leaved form with pink, pendulous fruits. Less hardy than most.

Acer negundo 'Elegans' (Acer negundo 'Elegantissima'). Variegated foliage with yellow edges. Slightly less than average height and spread.

Acer negundo 'Flamingo'. Pale to rosy pink variegated leaves at tips of all new rowths from late spring, through early summer and often into autumn. Mature leaves variegated white.

Acer negundo 'Variegatum' (Acer negundo 'Argenteovariegatum'). Broad, white leaf margins but likely to revert to green.

Acer negundo violaceum. Young shoots purple to violet and covered with white bloom. Long, pendent pink flower tassels in spring. Good autumn colours. Slightly less hardy. May have to be bought from specialist nurseries.

Ampelopsis breviped-unculata is Porcelain Berry, Amur Peppervine
ampelopsiscflobrevipedunculatawikimediacommons
Ampelopsis breviped-unculata, flower; Soaⁿ-phô-tô, hoe; 山葡萄, 花. By Albert, via Wikimedia Commons.

Yellow.

Flowers on new growth, so this vine may be cut to the ground in late winter (optional) to control growth.

Does well in all aspects. Light shade to full sun.

Jun-Aug

It is a major invasive plant species in parts of the Eastern United States. It is invasive in urban settings as well as in more pastoral settings. Porcelain berry is often found in disturbed areas such as roadsides, old fields, and floodplains where sunlight is abundant. Birds consume the seeds of porcelain berry and act as a vector to transport it.

After 10 years - 156 x 156 (400 x 400)

Deep Green

It is one on the list of Current Research Organisms for Control in New Zealand

Self-Clinging Climber for Non-House Walls, Fences, Pergolas

Cl D

Dislikes extremely wet, dry or poor cinditions. Does well on both acid or alkaline soil types.

Use - Attractive autumn foliage climber to cover non-house walls, fences and pergolas; when used on the latter makes a good shade cover. May also be grown without support along the ground to cover old stumps or rock piles.

Foliage - Three or five-lobed broadly ovate leaves, up to 6 inches (15 cm) long. Coarse texture. Downy undersides with pronounced veins often purple red in colour. Good yellow/orange autumn colour.

Stem - Light to green/brown, becoming darker, twining in habit, may be self-clinging on old brick walls. Medium to fast growing.

Fruit - Bright blue, grape-like in shape, 0.25-0.5 inches (5mm-1cm) wide. May require warm summers to fruit well.

Pruning - Not normally required other than that needed for shaping, although in confined spaces can be cut hard back in spring without ill effect.

Training - Tie young shoots to wires or wall fixings, normally becomes self-entwining and clinging on walls and fences or over pergolas.

Height/spread
5 years - 60 x 60 (150 x 150)
10 years - 156 x 156 (400 x 400)
20 years - 240 x 240 (600 x 600)
Protrudes up to 24 inches (60 cm) from support.

Problems - Can become invasive in good conditions. In too deep shade can become open and lax in habit. In wet autumns may fail to produce good autumn colour. Tolerates a minimum winter temperature of 14 degrees Fahrenheit (-10 degrees Centigrade).

 

Aucuba japonica is Japanese aucuba, spotted laurel, himalayan laurel and japanese laurel
aucubacflosjaponicawikimediacommons
Blütenstand von Aucuba japonica, aufgenommen am Standort in einem Wald in der Nähe von Kyoto. ByMichael Becker via Wikimedia Commons.

Small purple-red Flowers. Each variety carries either male or female flowers, which are similar in appearance; for fruiting, plants of both sexes are needed.

Tolerates all aspects. Dislikes full sun, tolerates deep shade.

Apr-May

After 10 years - 84 x 84 (210 x 210)

Dark, glossy, green.

Evergreen Climbers and Wall Shrubs

Sh E

Tolerates almost any soil, including dry and alkaline.

Use - As a freestanding or fan-trained shrub for large walls and fences in shady positions. This plant is valued for its ability to thrive in the most difficult of garden environments, dry shade. It also copes with pollution and salt-laden coastal winds. It is often seen as an informal hedge and used as evergreen screening.

Foliage - Lanceolate, dark, glossy green leaves 3-8 inches (7.5-20 cm) long and 1-3 inches (2.5-7.5 cm) wide.

Stem - Bright green and glossy. Strong, upright and branching, forming a round-topped shrub. Medium growth rate.

Fruit - On female plants clusters of bright red round fruits appear in autumn and remain through winter and possibly into spring. Produced only if male plant grows nearby.

Pruning - None required but may be cut back hard in spring to control size.

Training - Allow to grow freestanding or fan-trained to wires or individual anchor points.

Height/spread
5 years - 60 x 60 (150 x 150)
10 years - 84 x 84 (210 x 210)
20 years - 180 x 180 (460 x 460)
Protrudes up to 36 inches (91 cm) from support if fan-trained, 72 inches (180 cms) untrained.

Problems - None, apart from wind chill hazard. The process of fan-training may be a slow operation. Tolerates a minimum winter temperature of 4 degrees Fahrenheit (-15 degrees Centigrade), although some foliage damage may be caused by severe wind chill or late spring frosts.

Aucuba japonica 'Crotonifolia'. A slightly less vigorous variety with spotted and blotched golden leaves. Ideal as a privacy screen, windbreak and noise barrier.

Aucuba japonica 'Golden Spangles'. Bright golden variegation.

Aucuba japonica 'Mr Goldstrike'. A new golden variegated variety with red berries. Female plant.

Aucuba japonica 'Picturata'. Dark green leaves boldly splashed chrome yellow, slightly less vigorous than Aucuba japonica. Male plant.

Aucuba japonica 'Salicifolia'. A green-leaved form with very narrow, tooth-edged dark green foliage. Freely fruiting but not easy to find. Female plant.

Aucuba japonica 'Variegata'. Leaves liberally splashed golden and yellow. One of the most variegated forms. Female plant.

Aucuba japonica 'Variegata Gold Dust'. A very good form with golden variegated foliage and red berries in autumn. Female plant.

Caragana arborescens 'Lorbergii' is Lorberg Peashrub, Peatree
caraganacfloarborescenswikimediacommons
Flower of Caragana arborescens. By Andrew Butko via Wikimedia Commons.

Small, yellow, pea-shaped 0.25 inch (5 mm) long flowers borne in clusters of up to 4 on thin stalks, mid to late spring.

Tolerates all aspects, very wind resistant. Best in full sun, but tolerates light shade.

May

After 10 years - 156 x 156 (400 x 400)

Feathery, light grey/green leaves. Yellow autumn colour.

Climbers and Wall Shrubs for difficult, exposed positions

Tr D

Well drained soil. Caragana tolerates very alkaline soils and will also do well in very poor conditions, although it dislikes and will not grow well in a heavy, waterlogged soil.

Use - As a small fan-trained tree or shrub for large walls to show off its attractive feathery foliage.

Foliage - Very thin, wispy, feathery, light grey/green leaves up to 2 inches (5 cm) long. Yellow autumn colour.

Stem - Grey/green with attractive pronounced buds on branches. Moderately fast growing, slowing with age.

Fruit - Small pods, 1.5-2 inches (4-5 cm) long, containing 4 to 6 seeds, produced in autumn.

Pruning - Prune young bush trees hard in spring following planting. Select and train resulting 5 to 7 shoots and tie into a fan-trained shape. In subsequent years, remove all side growths back to 2 inches (5 cm) from their origin after flowering and maintaining main branches in fan shape.

Training - Requires tying to wires or individual anchor points.

Height/spread
5 years - 72 x 72 (180 x 180)
10 years - 156 x 156 (400 x 400)
20 years - 216 x 216 (550 x 550)
Protrudes up to 36 inches (91 cm) from support.

Problems - May be late to break leaf in spring and can appear dead, but grows quickly once established. Tolerates a minimum winter temperature of 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18 degrees Centigrade).

Partner plants -
Planted in-ground, 'Walker' could be a welcome high point to a bed of heathers and dwarf conifers.  In Winter, its bare branches would also provide some relief from all of that evergreenity.

That said, the tree's feathery foliage is shown to best advantage when larger leaves are nearby.  The foliage is only present in the warm months, and since 'Walker' loves sun—although not the day-and-night swelter of Zone 7 and warmer—consider pairing with sun-loving tropicals such as cannas, elephant ears, gingers, or bananas.

 If your 'Walker' is old enough that its canopy is (finally) broadening out to provide a bit of shade at the ground, you could underplant with low hostas.  Or, if the shrub is located where you have easy view of it in the Winter, you could choose hellebores.  They appreciate the good drainage that the 'Walker' needs, as well as the feathery shade it would provide in the Summer.

Celastrus orbiculatus is Staff Vine, Climbing Bittersweet, Oriental Bittersweet
celastruscflosorbiculatuswikimediacommons
Celastrus orbiculatus. By Dalgial, via Wikimedia Commons.

PlantThis and its Plant Selector are for those at any stage of their affair with plants. A reference for newcomers looking for guidance; a resource for knowledgeable enthusiasts; a selection tool for the practical and professional garden-maker; and inspiration for all the plant dreamers. The right plant for you is out there.

Small green flowers carried in clusters of up to 4 in early summer, of little interest. Flowers may be of single sex.

Full sun to medium shade with no particular preference.

Jun-Jul

 

Considered to be an invasive species in eastern North America. When Celastrus orbiculatus grows by itself, it forms thickets; when it is near a tree or shrub, the vines twist themselves around the trunk. The encircling vines have been known to strangle the host tree to death, which is also true of the American species, C. scandens.
One of Oriental bittersweet’s invasive characteristics is its effective utilization of energy to increase plant height, thus giving it a competitive advantage over similar plants.

After 10 years - 240 x 240 (600 x 600)

The Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States is a collaborative project between the National Park Service, the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, the Invasive Plant Atlas of New England and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. The purpose of the Atlas is to assist users with identification, early detection, prevention, and management of invasive plants.

Light to mid green, very good yellow autumn colouring.

This is recorded in Australia as being
a weed of the natural environment, escaping from cultivation,
a noxious (declared weed) and
as an 'invasive species'. This 'invasive species' term is only applied to serious high impact environmental and /or aggricultural weeds.

It might be thought that this plant is not one of their favourites in America or Australia, whereas in good old Britain we have nurseries selling this to us mugs.

Twining Climber for Non-House Walls, Fences, Pergolas

Cl D

Does well on all soil types, both alkaline and acid, with no particular preference except for adequate root run in moist, well-drained soil.

Use - For growing over large buildings such as garages and sheds, through large established trees and shrubs or over large constructions such as pergolas, since it is a large deciduous vigourous vine requiring careful space location to produce its best fruiting results.

Foliage - Oval, up to 5 inches (12 cm) long, with points; carried on short stalks up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) long; light to mid green, very good yellow autumn colouring.

Stem - Twsting, twining, not self-clinging; light grey/green when young becoming light creamy brown with age. Some limited winter attraction in good light. Very fast growing.

Fruit - The main attraction. Capsules, bright yellow in colour when ripe, oen to reveal a scarlet-coated seed within. Carried in large numbers on mature climbers. The hermaphrodite- flowered form is self-fertile and bears frit without a pollinator; otherwise male and female plants will be necessary.

Pruning - Not normally considered practical as it covers an extremely large area but can be reduced in size if required after fruiting.

Training - Leave to ramble through whatever type of construction or tree it is to cover. Self supporting by twining effect but not self-clinging.

Height/spread
5 years - 120 x 120 (300 x 300)
10 years - 240 x 240 (600 x 600)
20 years - 360 x 360 (900 x 900)
Protrudes up to 48 inches (120 cm) from support.

Problems - Its overall size is often underestimated and it must be allowed to achieve this size to produce good displays of fruit. Some all male forms may exist when propagated from seed, but most plants produced in commercial horticulture are of the hermaphrodite form so the problem of also finding space for a female plant normally does not arise.
Tolerates a minimum winter temperature of 4 degrees Fahrenheit ( -15 degrees Centigrade).

celastruscfrusorbiculatuswikimediacommons
Celastrus orbiculatus, Fruit, Aizu area, Fukushima pref., Japan. By Qwert1234, via Wikimedia Commons.
Oriental bittersweet is a strong competitor in its environment, and its dispersal has endangered the survival of several other species. One attribute that contributes to the success of this species is having attractively colored fruit. As a result, it is eaten by mammals and birds, which excrete the seeds to different locations.

Chaenomeles is Quince
chaenomelescfloscathensiswikimediacommons
Chaenomeles cathayensis. By Shu Suehiro, via Wikimedia Commons


chaenomelescfruscathensiswikimediacommons
Unreife Früchte der Japanischen Zierquitte (Chaenomeles japonica), fotografiert in Nordbaden (Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland). By 4028mdk09, via Wikimedia Commons

Single flowers shaped and sized like apple blossom borne in profusion on wood 2 years old or more, Early to mid spring. Colours range through white, pink, apricot, flame, orange and red, depending on variety.

Tolerates all aspects. Does well in full sun to deep shade.

Mar-May

After 10 years - 144 x 144 (370 x 370)

Light to dark green. Some yellow autumn colour.

Wall Shrubs for The Prime Site

Sh D

Does well on any soil but liable to chlorosis in very alkaline areas.

Use- As a fan-trained deciduous shrub for walls and fences, as well as a spiny hedge barrier.
Quince (Chaenomeles) originate from China and Japan and they are a common ornamental shrub which is used as a bonsai due to the showy flowers that bloom in Spring. There are a wide range of cultivars to choose from and the most commonly used as a bonsai is Chaenomeles speciosa.

Foliage - Leaves elliptic, medium-sized, 3-4 inches (7.5-10 cm) long, light to dark green. Some yellow autumn colour.

Stem - Upright when young and light green/brown, becoming dark brown, more twiggy and producing isolated large rigid thorns. Medium rate of growth.

Fruit - Large, pear-shaped fruits follow the flowers, ripening to an attractive bright yellow.

Pruning - Apart from growth required for fan shape, remove all previous season's growth back to 2 buds in spring before flowering, making sure that flowering buds are not removed.

Training - Requires wires or individual anchor points to secure and encourage the fan-trained shape.

Height/spread
5 years - 84 x 84 (210 x 210)
10 years - 144 x 144 (370 x 370)
20 years - 168 x 168 9430 x 430)
Protrudes 36-48 inches (91-120) from suport.

Problems - Intermittently produces very sharp thorns. May suffer fungus disease such as canker; prune out affected wood.
Tolerates a minimum winter temperature of 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18 dgrees Centigrade).

Good companions
Chaenomeles are at their best planted with Clematis alpina. 'Willy' is a good small-flowered pink partner for 'Moerloosei'. 'Frances Rivis' is larger and blue. Under the strong reds, the greeny golds of Euphorbia robbiae or the slightly more tender C. 'Portuguese Velvet' look good.

Chaenomeles x californica 'Enchantress'. A compact, profuse bloomer producing striking salmon-pink flowers with golden anthers in spring.

Chaenomeles cathayensis. salmon-pink flushed white flowers in April which are followed by the largest fruit - highly sought after for making jellies and jams, especially good cooked with apples in pies.

Chaenomeles japonica (Maule's Quince or Japanese Quince) is native to Japan. Orange/red flowers, which attract bees and bumblebees. Birds eat fruit and use dense branches as protection and nest sites.

Chaenomeles japonica 'Alpina'. Orange/red flowers borne freel, late spring. A little shy to fruit due to its less vigorous habit.

Chaenomeles japonica 'Issai Red'. Small red flowers in abundance.

Chaenomeles japonica 'Issai White'. Many small white flowers.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Atrococcinea'. Large, deep crimson flowers.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Brilliant'. Large brilliant red to clear scarlet flowers.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Cardinalis'. Crimson-scarlet flowers.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Eximia'. Upright deep brick-red flowers.

Chaenomeles speciosa
'Geisha Girl'. Very attractive deep apricot flowers. Later flowering.

Chaenomeles speciosa Moerloosei' (Apple Blossom). Pink and white flowers, more sparsely produced than some forms.

Chaenomeles speciosa
'Nivalis'. A pure white-flowered variety, green/white on first opening. Fewer flowers than average, but growth more vigorous.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Rosea Plena'. Double rich rose-pink flowers.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Simonii' . Deep blood red flowers freely produced. Low growing.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Snow'. Snow-white flowers. A good variety.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Umbilicata'. Deep pink flowers, larger than most.

Chaenomeles speciosa 'Verbooms Vermilion'. Upright growing, bright red flowers.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Aurora'. Peach/pink flowers, unusual.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Ballerina'. Large deep red flowers.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Boule de Feu'. Vermillion flowers, strong-growing. Good yellow fruit.

Chaenomeles x superba 'Chosan'. Semi-double, peach/apricot flowers; low-growing.

Chaenomeles x superba 'Coral Sea'. Coral-pink good sized flowers and good fruits.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Crimson and Gold'. Bright red flowers with pronounced golden anthers. Good fruit production.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Elly Mossel'. Large, bright scarlet flowers, good fruit.

Chaenomeles x superba 'ernest Finken'. Upright brilliant red flowers.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Etna'. Rich vermillion flowers, good colour.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Fascination'. Vivid orange flowers.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Fire Dance'. Rich, orange/scarlet flowers, good fruit.

Chaenomeles x superba 'Hever Castle'. Shrimp pink flowers.

Chaenomeles x superba 'Knap Hill Scarlet'. Smaller, brilliant orange/scarlet flowers, freely borne. Height slightly less than average.

Chaenomeles x superba 'Hollandia'. An excellent scarlet/red flowering variety with good fruits.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Nicoline' . Large red flowers, average height but with more spread.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Pink Lady'. Good deep pink flowers and good fruits.

Chaenomeles x superba 'Port Elliot'. Large red flowers, good growth.

Chaenomeles x superba 'Ohld'. Large red flowers of good stature.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Rowallane'. Brilliant crimson flowers and small fruits.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Texus Scarlet'. Scarlet red flowers.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Vermillion'. Vermillion red flowers.

Chaenomeles x superba
'Vesuvius'. Scarlet red flowers.

There are many varieties of Chaenomeles speciosa and Chaenomeles x superba. Those listed above are a good representative selection.

Clematis montana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clematis vitalba

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotinus coggygria

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotoneaster x horizontalis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotoneaster hybridus pendulus (Low-growing, spreading Evergreen Forms for Walls)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotoneaster hybridus pendulus (Medium Height, Spreading Evergreen and Semi-evergreen Forms for Walls)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotoneaster hybridus pendulus (Tall Deciduous Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cotoneaster hybridus pendulus (Tall Evergreen Form)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crataegus (Autumn Foliage Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crataegus oxyacantha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cydonia oblonga

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elaeagnus x ebbingei

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elaeagnus pungens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Euonymus fortunei

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forsythia suspensa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ginkgo biloba

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix angularis 'Aurea'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix 'Buttercup'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix 'Cristata'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix 'Glacier'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix 'Gold Heart'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix 'Luzii'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hedera helix sagittifolia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrangea petiolaris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ilex x altaclaerensis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ilex aquifolium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jasminum nudiflorum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kerria japonica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kolkwitzia amabilis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laburnocytisus x adamii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laburnum x watereri 'Voissii'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ligustrum lucidum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ligustrum ovalifolium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ligustrum quihoui

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ligustrum sinense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lonicera japonica 'Halliana'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lonicera japonica repens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lonicera nitida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lonicera peri-clymenum (Hybrids)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lonicera tatarica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lycium barbarum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mahonia x 'Charity'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malus (Fruiting Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malus (Green-leaved Flowering Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malus (Purple-leaved Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parthenocissus henryana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Veichii'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Philadelphus (Medium-sized Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Philadelphus (Tall-growing Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillyrea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polygonum bald-schuanicum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pyracantha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pyrus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robinia pseudoacacia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa (Climbing Musk Roses and similar Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa (Modern Hybrid Climbing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Alchemist'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Aloha'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Compassion'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Dance du Feu'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Dreaming Spires'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Golden Showers'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Leverkusen'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Maigold'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Masquerade, Climbing'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Mme Edouard Herriot'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Mme Gregoire Staechelin'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Mme Henri Guillot'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Morning Jewel'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'New Dawn, Climbing'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Paul's Scarlet'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Pink Perpetue'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Queen Elizabeth, Climbing'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa 'Rosy Mantle'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa (Rambler Roses)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rosa (Shrub and Species Roses for Fan-training)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rubus phoeni-colasius

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rubus tricolor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rubus ulmifolius 'Bellidiflorus'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sorbus aria

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viburnum (Best Fruiting Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viburnum (Early-flowering Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viburnum (Large-leaved Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viburnum opulus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viburnum plicatum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viburnum (Spring Flowering, Scented Forms)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vinca major

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vitis 'Brant'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vitis coignetiae

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weigela

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Many other climbers and wall shrubs may perform well with this type of cultivation but those listed above are the most reliable." from The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.
 

Bupleurum fruticosum is Shrubby hare's ear
bupleurumcflosfruticosumwikimediacommons
Bupleurum fruticosum, flowers. By Aroche, via Wikimedia Commons

Bell-shaped clusters of green/cream to yellow/green flowers from mid summer to early autumn.

All but the most exposed walls. Best in full sun. Tolerates light shade but becomes looser in habit in deep shade.

Jul-Sep

After 10 years - 72 x 72 (180 x 180)

Dark, glossy, grey/green with silver undersides.

Wall Shrubs for The Prime Site

Sh E

Any well-drained soil conditions.

Use - As a medium sized, evergreen wall shrub for shady walls with distinctively coloured flowers. Whether positioned as a specimen, massed as a screen or windbreak or utilized as a backdrop for a mixed planting, its quiet, yet handsome persona is sure to please.

Foliage - Elliptic, 0.5-2 inch (1-5 cm) long, dark, glossy, grey/green with silver undersides.

Stem - Light green to dark olive-green, forming a rounded shrub, somewhat loose in habit. Medium to slow growth rate.

Fruit - Brown seedheads, interesting in winter.

Pruning - None required. May be trimmed or cut back to maintain shape.

Training - Requires wires or individual anchor points to secure and encourage the fan-trained shape.

Height/spread
5 years - 36 x 36 (91 x 91)
10 years - 72 x 72 (180 x 180)
20 years - 96 x 96 (240 x 240)
Protrudes up to 36 inches (91 cm) from support.

Problems - Not easy to find. Established shrubs withstand winter temperatures down to 4 degrees Fahrenheit (-15 degrees Centigrade), but young plants are less hardy. Good in exposed coastal sites. Can be clipped to becoming a hedge.

Good companions

Choose a sunny, open position for this medium-sized shrub so it can glow and shimmer. Use it as a backdrop for brightly hued late-summer performers. Avoid pale pinks, they will make the lime-yellow flowers look insipid. B. fruticosum also makes a good shrub on a south-facing wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 3
PAGES

Site Map

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY PAGES Links to pages in Table alongside on the left with Garden Design Topic Pages

Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

Plant Type
 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 with its Cultivation Requirements

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border
1
, 2

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime 1, 2

Alpines and Walls
Dry Sunny Walls 1a, b
Tops of Walls 2a, b
Dry Shady and Conifers 3a, b

Alpines and
Paving
1
, 2

Sink and Trough gardens
1
, 2

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion River-bank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)
1
, 2

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Water-side Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond
1
, 2

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------



 

 

ANY PLANT TYPE for
Cut Flowers in
January 1, 2
February
March 1, 2
April
May 1, 2
June 1, 2
July 1, 2
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Con-tainers

Cut Flowers
1
, 2, 3 Ever-lasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attract-ing bene-ficial insects
1
, 2

Scent / Fra-grance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas and Colour Schemes with Annuals
1
, 2

Low-Growing Annuals
1
, 2

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers and Cut Flowers
Page
1
, 2, 3

White Flowers
1
, 2

Yellow or Orange Flowers
1
, 2

Dec-orative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade
1
, 2

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attract-ive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elabo-rated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screen-ing

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Stand-ards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

 

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens
1
, 2

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Con-tainers with Biennials for Pots in Green-house / Con-servatory

Bene-ficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explan-ation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
Dec-ember
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for Sep-tember
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes
1
, 2

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs natural-ised in Grass

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Apr-May
Jun-Aug 1, 2, 3, 4

Any Plant Type (some grown in Cool Green-house) Bloom-ing in
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Any Plant Type Blooming in Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Wood-land Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achi-menes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Aris-aemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomar-eas, Calad-iums

Clivias,
Colo-casias, Crinums, Cyclam-ens, Cyrt-anthuses, Euchar-ises, Urceo-charis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachen-alias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone 1, 1a

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloom-eria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calo-chorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Col-chicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Mon-tbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Ery-thrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Gal-anthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hya-cinth, Hya-cinths in Pots,
Scilla, Pusch-kinia, Chion-odoxa, Chiono-scilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapey-rousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidan-thera, Albuca, Alstroe-meri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixio-lirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogal-ums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooper-ias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant each Bedding Plant with a Ground, Edging or Dot Plant for
Spring
1
, 2
or
Summer
1
, 2

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with

Any Plant Type flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1, 2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec
 

----------
Choosing the right Plant

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vege-tables

1d.
Cut
flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised
Bed
for Wheel-chair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least prot-ruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Ground-cover

1,2
Ornam-ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conserv-atory or Green-house

Large
Pots and Con-tainers
1
, 2

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salverform

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elaborated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a
Standards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

andosacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms

 

STAGE 4A 12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Brown

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Cream

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
White

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Multi-Colou-red

1
Each Flower Diff-

1
erent Colour

 

STAGE 4B 12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY
Deciduous Shrubs or Trees, Herbaceous Perennials or Bulbs- if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.
Evergreen Shrubs or Trees, Evergreen Perennials - if that changes from the main colour for instance to a different autumn colour, then it will be in this column and the relevant colour for those months of Win (Winter), Spr (Spring), Sum (Summer) or Aut (Autumn) group as well.

Jan Win

Feb Win

Mar Spr

Apr Spr

May Spr

Jun Sum

Jul Sum

Aug Sum

Sep Aut

Oct Aut

Nov Aut

Dec Win

Decid
Herba

Ever-green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Blue

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Mauve

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Purple

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Black

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Bronze

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Green

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Orange

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Pink

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Red

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Grey

1
White

1
Silver

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Yellow

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1
Un-
usual

1
Varie-gated

1

1

1

1

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Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders - was first published in 1977 and this paperback edition was published on 1 August 1994 ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-
This comprehensive book looks at scented flowers and leaves of plants from all over the world. The work has been prepared to the standards of the Index Kewensis, and is filled with the most interesting facts about the scented flora of the world.

I am using the above book from someone who took 30 years to compile it from notes made of his detailed observations of growing plants in preference to
The RHS Companion to Scented Plants Hardcover – 16 Oct 2014 by Stephen Lacey (Author), Andrew Lawson (Photographer) ISBN 978-0-7112-3574-8 even though this is the only major reference work on scent and scented plants which is endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society. See reasons for stopping infilling of previous Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page.

The Propagation of Alpines by Lawrence D. Hills. Published in 1950 by Faber and Faber Limited describes every method of propagation for 2,500 species. Unlike modern books published since 1980, this one states exactly what to do and is precisely what you require if you want to increase your alpines.

Topic
Case Studies
Companion Planting

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design

...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants

...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries
Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens

A 1, Photos
B 1, Photos
C 1, Photos
D 1, Photos
E 1, Photos
F 1, Photos
G 1, Photos
H 1, Photos
I 1, Photos
J 1, Photos
K 1, Photos
L 1, Photos
M 1, Photos
N 1, Photos
O 1, Photos
P 1, Photos
Q 1, Photos
R 1, Photos
S 1, Photos
T 1, Photos
U 1, Photos
V 1, Photos
W 1, Photos
X 1 Photos
Y 1, Photos
Z 1 Photos
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens
Flower Shape and Plant Use of
Bedding
Bulb
Evergreen Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Rose


Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
Bulb
Climber

 

Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12

All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index

All Foliage 212
All Spring Foliage 212

All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212
Rock Plant Flowers 53

 

Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process

Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...Infill2 Plants
...Infill3 Plants *
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...All2 Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

 

Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods

Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Vegetable

Wild Flower

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly

 

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY

 

Cultivation Requirements of Plant

Outdoor / Garden Cultivation

1

Indoor / House Cultivation

1

Cool Greenhouse (and Alpine House) Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter

1

Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year

1

Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

1

 

Sun Aspect

Full Sun

1

Part Shade

1

Full Shade

1

 

Soil Type

Any Soil

1

Chalky Soil

1

Clay Soil

1

Lime-Free Soil

1

Peaty Soil

1

Sandy Soil

1

Acid Soil

1

Alkaline Soil

1

Badly-drained Soil

1

 

Soil Moisture

Dry

1

Moist

1

Wet

1

 

Position for Plant

Back of Shady Border

1

Back of Shrub Border

1

Bedding

1

Bog Garden

1

Coastal Conditions / Seaside

1

Container in Garden

1

Front of Border

1

Ground Cover 0-24 inches (0-60 cms)

1

Ground Cover 24-72 inches (60-180 cms)

1

Ground Cover Over 72 inches (180 cms)

1

Hanging Basket

1

Hedge

1

Hedge - Thorny

1

Pollution Barrier

1

Pond

1

Pot in House, Greenhouse, Conservatory or Stovehouse

1

Raised Bed

1

Rest of Border

1

Rock Garden

1

Scree Bed

1

Speciman on Lawn

1

Sunny Border

1

Tree for Lawn

1

Tree/Shrub for Small Garden

1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9, 10,
11,12,
13,14,
15,16,
uses of tree/ shrub

Wildflower

1

Windbreak

1

Woodland

1

 

Use of Plant

Pollen or nectar for Bees

1

Hosts to Butterflies

1

Encouraging birds / wildlife, providing food and shelter

1

Bee-Pollinated plants for Hay Fever Sufferers

1

Berries / Fruit

1

Dry Site in Full Sun

1

Dry Shade

1

Filtering noise

1

Flower Arrange-ments

Growing Plants for the Church

1



1, 2,
3, 4,
5, 6,
7, 8,
9,10,
11,12,
13,14

Fragrant Flower

1

Language of Flowers

1

Low maintenance

1

Moist Shade

1

Moist and swampy Sites

1

Nitrogen fixing plants

1

Not Fragrant Flower

1

Rabbit-Resistant

1

Speciman Plant

1

Thornless

1

Tolerant of Poor Soil

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Plant Foliage

Aromatic Foliage

1

Autumn Foliage

1

Finely Cut Leaves

1

Large Leaves

1

Yellow Variegated Foliage

1

White Variegated Foliage

1

Red / Purple Variegated Foliage

1

Silver, Grey and Glaucous Foliage

1

Sword-shaped Leaves

1

 

 

Flower Shape

Number of Flower Petals

Petal-less
lessershapemeadowrue2a1a1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

1 Petal

1

2 Petals

1

3 Petals
irisflotpseudacorus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

4 Petals
aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

5 Petals
anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Above 5
anemonecflo1blandafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Flower Shape - Simple

Stars
anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bowls
 

1

Cups and Saucers
euphorbiacflo1wallichiigarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Globes
paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Goblets and Chalices
paeoniaveitchiiwoodwardiiflot1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Trumpets
acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Funnels
stachysflotmacrantha1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Bells
digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Thimbles
fuchsiaflotcalicehoffman1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Urns
ericacarneacflosspringwoodwhitedeeproot1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Salverform

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

Flower Shape - Elaborated

Tubes, Lips and Straps
prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets
aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Hats, Hoods and Helmets
acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Standards, Wings and Keels
lathyrusflotvernus1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Discs and Florets
brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pin-Cushions
echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Tufts
centaureacfloatropurpureakavanagh1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Cushion
androsacecforyargongensiskevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Umbel
agapanthuscflos1campanulatusalbidusgarnonswilliams1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Buttons
argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Pompoms
armeriacflomaritimakevock1a1a1a1a1a1

1

 

Natural Arrangements

Bunches, Posies, Sprays
bergeniamorningredcforcoblands1a1a1a1a1a1

1

Columns, Spikes and Spires
ajugacfloreptansatropurpurea1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Whorls, Tiers and Candelabra
lamiumflotorvala2a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Plumes and Tails
astilbepurplelancecflokevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

Chains and Tassels
 

1

Clouds, Garlands and Cascades
 

1

Spheres, Domes (Clusters), Plates and Drumsticks
androsacecfor1albanakevock1a1a1a1a1a1a

1

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Shrub, Tree Shape

Columnar
ccolumnarshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Oval
covalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Rounded or Spherical
croundedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Flattened Spherical
cflattenedsphericalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Conical / Narrow Pyramidal
cnarrowconicalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Conical / Broad Pyramidal
cbroadpyramidalshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Ovoid /
Egg-Shaped

ceggshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Ovoid
cbroadovoidshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Vase-shaped / Inverted Ovoid
cnarrowvaseshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Fan-Shaped /Vase-Shaped
cfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Fan-Shaped / Broad Vase-Shaped
cbroadfanshapedshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Narrow Weeping
cnarrowweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Broad Weeping
cbroadweepingshape1a1a1a1a1

1

Palm

1

 

Conifer Cone

1

 

Form

Arching

1

Climbing

1

Clump-Forming

1

Mat-Forming

1

Mound-Forming

1

Prostrate

1

Spreading

1

Stemless

1

Upright

1

 

Poisonous Plant

1

 

STAGE 1
GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark
1
, 2, 3

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves
1
, 2, 3

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2

Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2

Scented Aquatic Plants
1


Plants with Scented Fruits
1


Plants with Scented Roots
1
, 2

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood
1


Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums
1


Scented Cacti and Succulents
1


Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell
1
, 2
 

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY 3

Fan-trained Shape
fantrainedshape2a1a1a

From Rhododendrons, boxwood, azaleas, clematis, novelties, bay trees, hardy plants, evergreens : novelties bulbs, cannas novelties, palms, araucarias, ferns, vines, orchids, flowering shrubs, ornamental grasses and trees book, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Ramblers Scramblers & Twiners by Michael Jefferson-Brown (ISBN 0 - 7153 - 0942 - 0) describes how to choose, plant and nurture over 500 high-performance climbing plants and wall shrubs, so that more can be made of your garden if you think not just laterally on the ground but use the vertical support structures including the house as well.

The Gardener's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Climbers & Wall Shrubs - A Guide to more than 2000 varieties including Roses, Clematis and Fruit Trees by Brian Davis. (ISBN 0-670-82929-3) provides the lists for 'Choosing the right Shrub or Climber' together with Average Height and Spread after 5 years, 10 years and 20 years.

 

STAGE 2
INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3


Gardening with Alpines by Stanley B. Whitehead. Garden Book Club.
Published in 1962. It provides most of the data about the Alpines.

Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN
13:978
0 00 719312 7, provides many of the plants for the pages in these Galleries.

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

Indoor Bulb
Growing by
Edward Pearson
. Published by Purnell & Sons, Ltd in 1953. It provides the data about Indoor Bulbs and Bulbs in
Window-boxes.

Colour All The
Year In My Garden
: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour
in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book
from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.
The Book of Bulbs by S. Arnott, F.R.H.S. Printed by
Turnbull & Spears, Edinburgh in 1901. This provides data about Hardy Bulbs, Half-Hardy Bulbs, Greenhouse and Stove Bulbs.

Collins Guide to
Bulbs by Patrick
M. Synge
. ISBN
0 00 214016-0
First Edition 1961, Second Edition 1971, Reprinted 1973. This provides data on bulbs for bedding, bulbs in the border, bulbs naturalised in grass, bulbs in the woodland garden, bulbs in the rock garden, bulbs in pans in the alpine house, bulbs in the greenhouse, bulbs in bowls and the bulb frame.

Annuals & Biennials, the best annual and biennial plants and their uses in the garden by Gertrude Jekyll published in 1916 and
republished by Forgotten Books in 2012
(Forgotten Books
is a London-based book publisher specializing in the restoration of old books, both fiction and non-fiction. Today we have
372,702 books available to read online, download as ebooks, or
purchase in print.).

Cut Flowers All The Year from The New Illustrated
Gardening Encyclopedia
by Richard Sudell, printed before May 1935 for the plant names in each month, followed by details for culture and propagation.

Mr. Middleton's Garden Book by
Daily Express Publication,
reprinted 1941
for the individual
cultivar names with evergreen/
deciduous, flower colour, flower month and height.

 

STAGE 4D
SHAPE, FORM INDEX GALLERY

Tree and Shrubs in Garden Design -

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Clay Soils (neutral to slightly acid)

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Dry Acid Soils

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Shallow Soil over Chalk

Trees and Shrubs tolerant of both extreme Acidity and Alkalinity

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Damp Sites

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Industrial Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Cold Exposed Areas

Trees and Shrubs suitable for Seaside Areas

Shrubs suitable for Heavy Shade

Shrubs and Climbers suitable for NORTH- and EAST-facing Walls

Shrubs suitable for Ground Cover

Trees of Pendulous Habit

Trees and Shrubs of Upright or Fastigiate Habit

Trees and Shrubs with Ornamental Bark or Twigs

Trees and Shrubs with Bold Foliage

Trees and Shrubs for Autumn Colour

Trees and Shrubs with Red or Purple Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Golden or Yellow Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Grey or Silver Foliage

Trees and Shrubs with Variegated Foliage

Trees and Shrubs bearing Ornamental Fruit

Trees and Shrubs with Fragrant or Scented Flowers

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Foliage

Flowering Trees and Shrubs for Every Month:-
Jan
, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec

The following table shows the linkages for the information about the plants
described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening in The Gardeners' Golden Treasury, revised by A. G. L Hellyer F.L.S, Editor of 'Amateur Gardening', (thirty-first impression of original published in 1895) was published in 1960 by W. H. & L. Collingridge Limited,
between:-

  • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery (in this Table) and Stage 1 Fragrant Plants (in Table on left), then
  • Stage 2 - 3 Infill Plants Index Galleries (in Table on right), then
  • Stage 3a - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2 (in this Table)
  • Stage 3b - All2 Plants Index Gallery for Alpines without a Garden for your health and productivity (in this Table)
  • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right)
  • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery (in Table on right) with
    column for Deciduous / Herbaceous plants with the same foliage colour during their growing season and
    column for Evergreen plants with the same foliage colour during the entire year
  • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery (in Table on left)
  • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery (in Table on left)

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
It would be useful if when you decide to change your garden that you use a uniform garden style throughout your garden and the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY aims to provide pointers.
The new pages (April 2016) in the gallery will have a suitable list of plants on each page (as that plant gets further detailed in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY), then each row containing that plant name in the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY will also be updated. I aim to input details of plants starting with A in alphabetical order to Z.

Private Garden Design:-
What is your Budget and What are the purposes for your garden?
Designing for a purpose: Areas which require answers before answering your Designing for a Purpose Questionaire.
Then, do the Site Survey with Photographs, before putting the Current Garden Design on paper or in your computer.
Using the Broad Design elements of Scale, which Garden Style to use:-
Low Maintenance Garden Style, Cottage Garden Style, Wildlife Garden Style or Japanese Garden Style and the
Hard and Soft Landscaping elements, create the Broad Proposed Design. Then, the Detailed Design of each Hard Landscaping item followed by the Soft Landscaping elements: The Soil, changing the Microclimate; and the
Plant Selection is influenced by the Colour Wheel, with Plant Quantities determined by time to establish versus width between plants and Companion Planting will provide helpful neighbouring plants
or
Click on text in cells below to jump to that page describing that data
.

 


Container

Gardening at my work-place

 

<----

 

Yes
|
v


Do you want to garden and grow plants?

 

No

Cannot be bothered.
If you wish to improve your productivity and health, then, plant an Alpine Pan in your work area or at home using the information within Alpines without a Garden by Lawrence D. Hills, using these pages:-


Potted
House-plant


<----
|
|
v


No
Garden

At Home with Gard-ening Area


Yes


---->

Balcony Garden or Roof Garden


Yes
---->

Grow flowers for flower arranging and vegetables on Balcony Garden or Roof Garden

Pan Plant Back-grou-nd Colour

STAGE 3b
ALL2 PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

|
v


Conservatory Gardening

|
<--
|

 

|
No
-->

Outside Garden
|
v

Pan, Trough and Window-Box Odds and Sods
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14,
15

The beginner's dozen for the small pan

Plants for the pan gar-den


Stovehouse for Tropical Plants

|
<--

An extra dozen for the larger pan

Kinds of Pan Plants that may be split up and tucked in Corners and Crevices

|
|
v

Miniature trees and shrubs for pan

The leafy soil pan

The gritty soil pan

The Limy Soil Plan

Blue Flower Colour Pan Plants

Lilac, Violet and Purple Flower Colour Pan Plants

Reds, Carm-ines Flower Colour Pan Plants

Pinks Flower Colour Pan Plants

White Flower Colour Pan Plants and Bicol-ored

Yellow Flower Colour Pan Plants

Blue Flower Colour Trough Plants

Violet, Lilac and Purple Flower Colour Trough Plants

|
|
v

Reds and Carm-ines Flower Colour Trough Plants

Pinks - all shades Flower Colour Trough Plants

Yellow Flower Colour Trough Plants

White and Cream Flower Colour Trough Plants

Bi-colour-ed Flower Colour Trough Plants

Feb Flower Season Pan

Mar Flower Season Pan

Apr Flower Season Pan

May Flower Season Pan

Jun Flower Season Pan

Jul Flower Season Pan

Aug Flower Season Pan

Sep Flower Season Pan

|
|
v

Oct Flower Season Pan

Nov Flower Season Pan

Pans for Semi-shade

Pans for In-doors

Mini-ature Pot

Feb Flower Season Trough

Mar Flower Season Trough

Apr Flower Season Trough

May Flower Season Trough

Jun Flower Season Trough

Jul Flower Season Trough

Aug Flower Season Trough

Sep Flower Season Trough

|
|
v

Oct Flower Season Trough

Nov Flower Season Trough

Dec Flower Season Trough

Bulb Pan

Bulb Cover-ing Carp-eters

Trough and Window-box plants 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Trough and Window-Box Background Colour

Pan Plant
Alpines without a Garden

ABC 1
Pan Plants

DEF 1
Pan Plants

GHI
Pan Plants

JKL 1
Pan Plants

|
|
v

MNO 1
Pan Plants

PQR 1
Pan Plants

STU 1
Pan Plants

V 1
Pan Plants

WXYZ 1
Pan Plants

You need to know the following:-
1. How much time per week are you prepared to look after your garden or prepared to pay someone else to do it for you?
2. How much are you are prepared to spend on creating your garden and then on its maintenance for its feeding and replacement of its plants and hard landscaping?
3. In order for you to go into your garden, there must be mystery in it, so that from any position in the house you cannot see all the garden, otherwise you will not be tempted to go out into it.
4. You must decide what garden style you are going to use THROUGHOUT the garden and make sure of using 3. the mystery in it as well.
5. What plants do you want to keep in your existing garden and incorporate into your new garden?
6. What Human Problems do you have and what Site Problems are there?

A) Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers List leads onto the
B) Bee Pollinated Bloom in Month galleries and
C) extra Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers.


<----

Human Prob-lems
v


---->

Blind,
Deaf,
in a Wheelchair, or
you cannot bend easily

 

 

 

Garden Style, which takes into account the Human Problems above

 

 

Classic Mixed Style


<----

Cottage Garden Style


<----

.
v


---->

Naturalistic Style

Formal English Garden

 

Mediterranean Style


<----

Meadow and Corn-field


<----

.
.
v


---->

Paving and Gravel inland,
Coastal Conditions near the sea, Seashore with shingle/sand

 

 

 

 

Problem Sites within your chosen Garden Style from the above

 

 

Exposure to Wind


<----

Excess Shade


<----

Exce-ssively Dry Shade


<----


<----

.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Exce-ssively Hot, Sunny and Dry Site is suitable for Drought Resistant Plants

Excessively Wet Soil - especially when caused by poor drainage

Control of Pests (Aphids, Rabbits, Deer, Mice, Mole, Snails) / Disease by Companion Planting in Garden

Whether your Heavy Clay or Light Sandy / Chalk Soil is excessively Alkaline (limy) / Acidic or not, then there is an Action Plan for you to do with your soil, which will improve its texture to make its structure into a productive soil instead of it returning to being just sand, chalk, silt or clay.


<----

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Problems caused by builders:- 1. Lack of soil on top of builders rubble in garden of just built house.
2. Clay soil of Garden slopes towards house with no drainage of this rainwater by the house wall.

In planning your beds for your garden, before the vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman planting is inserted into your soft landscaping plan, the following is useful to consider:-
1. The ground plan usually depends upon 1 or more unalterable existing features. The position of the doors of the house will dictate the positions of paths, the shortest route to the kitchen may indicate the best place for a paved area for eating and drinking out of doors, or the kept trees/shrubs may indicate what garden style is used.
2. Rules of Proportion -
A. A border should be roughly 1/2 as wide as the hedge or wall behind it.
B. The proportion of planted areas to paved or turfed areas should be 1/3 to 2/3, or a 1/4 to 3/4, not 1/2 and 1/2.
C. Within a bed or border, unless a 2-dimensional pattern on the ground is the objective, the height and bulk of the plants should be varied to avoid monotony; it is particularly important to provide strong planting, in terms of either height or bulk or both, at either end of a long bed.
D. The ground surface provides a background to the plants that is as important as the hedges, walls or fences that surround it. Grass is perhaps the most satisfying carpet to use, the cool green forming a restful antidote to the dancing colours of the flowers. Use different coloured pea-shingle inside Cedar Gravel for people in wheelchairs, or infirm in their legs or who suffer from Hay Fever.

Reasons for stopping infilling of Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance from Stephen Lacey Page. From September 2017 will be creating the following new pages on Sense of Fragrance using Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders.
ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

After you have selected your vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman plants for each bed or border, you will need to infill with plants taking the following into account:-

 

 

 

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark 1, 2, 3
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Sandy Soil 1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves 1, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit 1, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants 1, 2
Scented Aquatic Plants.
Plants with Scented Fruits.
Plants with Scented Roots 1, 2
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.
Scented Cacti and Succulents.
Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell 1, 2

Flower Perfume Group:-
Miscellaneous Group with scents - Balm, Brandy, Cedar, Cloying, Cowslip, Cucumber, Damask Rose, Daphne, Exotic, Freesia, Fur-like, Gardenia, Hay-like, Heliotrope, Honeysuckle, Hops, Hyacinth, Incense-like, Jasmine, Laburnham, Lilac, Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette, Mint, Mossy, Muscat, Muscatel, Myrtle-like, Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg, Piercing, Primrose, Pungent, Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras, Seductive, Slight, Soft, Stephanotis, Sulphur, Starch, Sweet, Sweet-briar, Tea-rose, Treacle and Very Sweet.

Flower Perfume Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.
Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.
Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.
Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-
Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.
Honey Group.
Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint
Sulphur and
Urinous,

Leaf Perfume Group:-
Turpentine Group.
Camphor and Eucalyptus Group.
Mint Group.
Sulphur Group.
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Heavy Group.
Aromatic Group.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group.
Fruit-scented Group.
Animal-scented Group.
Honey Group.

Scent of Wood, Bark and Roots Group:-
Aromatic Group.
Turpentine Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Stale Perspiration Group.

 

Scent of Fungi Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Sulphur Group.
Aromatic Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Fruit Group.
Animal Group.
Honey Group

Sense of Sight

Emotion of
Hot /Cool; Calm / Agitated

Emotion of
Low-key / High Key


<----

.
.
.
v

Emotion of
Inviting
/ Forbidding

Emotion of Intellectual versus Emotional

Sense of Touch

Sense of Taste

Sense of Sound

 

 

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 for
lists of plants of 1 plant type for 1 cultivation requirement is in Table on right

 

 

 

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
Click on Blue or underlined text to jump to page comparing flower thumbnails of that blue colour in the
Other Plant Photo Galleries. RedPP is Red, Pink, Purple and Other is Unusual or Other Flower Colour.

Plant Type
with links to Other Plant Photo Galleries

ABC

DEF

GHI

JKL

MNO

PQR

STU

VWX

YZ

Alpine in Evergreen Perennial,
Herbaceous Perennial and Rock Garden

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Aquatic

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Annual/ Biennial

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bamboo

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Bedding, 25
RHS Mixed Border Beds 75 and
Flower Shape, Flower Colour and Bedding Plant Use

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Bicolour

Other Flower Colours

White / Colour Bicolour

Bulb, 746 with Use, Flower Colour/Shape of
Allium / Anemone, Colchicum / Crocus, Dahlia, Gladiolus, Narcissus and Tulip

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Climber 71 Clematis, 58 other Climbers with Use, Flower Colour and Shape

1

Blue

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Conifer

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Deciduous Shrub 43 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Deciduous Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Evergreen Perennial 104 with Use, Flower Colour, Flower Shape and Number of Petals

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Shrub 46, Semi-Evergreen Shrub and Heather 74 with Use and Flower Colour

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Evergreen Tree

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Fern with 706 ferns
within 21 types and 41 uses

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Grass

1

1

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

Herbaceous Perennial 91,
RHS Mixed Border Beds 176 and
Peonies 46 with Flower Colour/Shape

1

Blue

1

1

1

1

RedPP

1

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Herb

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Odds and Sods

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Rose with 720 roses within Flower Colour, Flower Shape, Rose Petal Count and Rose Use

1

1

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

RedPP

1

 

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Other

Soft Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Sub-Shrub

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Top Fruit

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Vegetable

1
 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Wildflower 1918 with
Plants used by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterflies in the UK
I am inserting the plants described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening into STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY

1

Blue

1

Green

1

Orange

1

Pink

1

Red

1

Purple

1

White

1

Yellow

1

Multi-colour

Cream

Mauve

Brown

Shrub and Small Tree

Botanical Names Page

Common Names Page

Finally, you might be advised to check that the adjacent plants to the one you have chosen for that position in a flower bed are suitable; by checking the entry in Companion Planting - like clicking A page for checking Abies - and Pest Control page if you have a pest to control in this part of the flower bed.
Companion Planting
- A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z
Pest Control using Plants

 

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY
The planning a Rose Garden chapter from Rose Gardens by Jane Fearnley-Whitingstall ISBN 0 7011 3344 9 and
Plant Solutions by Nigel Colborn provides information for this gallery.

STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERIES 1, 2, 3 Reference books for these galleries in Table on left

STAGE 3a ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY
In addition to these 10 galleries, there are links to the Other Plant Photo Galleries in the table above like Bulb , which have plant descriptions accessed by clicking a flower thumbnail in its flower comparison page. Click the respective flower colour - like Green - to change page to that flower colour comparison page. Then, you can also choose these other plants.
It will also state the Plant Combinations for each plant from The Ulimate Visual Guide to Successful Plant Harmony - The Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations by Tony Lord ISBN 1-55209-623-8

STAGE 4C CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY
Some extra details about the Cultivation Requirements of Plant:- Outdoor /Garden Cultivation, Indoor / House Cultivation, Cool Green-house Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter, Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year, and Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

Since 2006, I have requested photos etc from the Mail-Order Nurseries in the UK and later from the rest of the World. Few nurseries have responded.
I worked for a lady, who with her husband took 35 mm slides of plants in the 1960's and 1970's. She allowed me to digitise some of her Kodachrome slides, which I have used in my website. I discovered that at least the green colour of the foliage became very much darker over that period of years to 2008, by comparing wildflower photos from her slides with digital photos supplied by a current Wildflower mail-order nursery, so I stopped creating my Foliage Galleries.
I bought myself a camera some years ago and started taking photos, some of which have been put into the website. I started taking photos of the Heathers at the Royal Horticultural Society at Wisley garden. I have displayed the Heathers foliage in closeup since their leaves are 2mm long and in macro-scale in the Heather Galleries - sometimes the foliage colour at the terminal end of the foliage stem is only a few leaves, whereas others have the same foliage colour throughout the stem. I discovered that some of the heathers did not have the correct plant label, since the flower colour did not correspond with the flower colour in the literature. I was informed that since kids have free rein, that perhaps they move the plant labels. Since, I cannot rely that the heather plant label next to the heather plant is valid, I have stopped taking photos of those heathers.
This leaves a small problem, especially since very few gardens open to the public have their plants labelled so that the public can use the data on their label to buy that named plant from a nursery or garden centre. Currently (June 2018) I insert photos from Wikimedia Commons as well as my own.
I have found the above book - which does not contain any colour plant photos. Since it had the following experts help in creating it, I have decided to use its information in these 10 galleries to help the public:-

  • T.W. Sanders Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1895.
  • A.J Macself Editor of Amateur Gardening in 1926 - both Sanders and Macself had worked entirely to the handlists published by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • A.G.L. Hellyer in this work of revision and also in checking the all-important cultural notes sought the help of experts in the various classes of plant:-
    • Mr S.A. Pearce, Assistant Curator at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew undertook the revision of those genera of plants which in this country are mainly grown under glass.
    • Mr Will Ingwersen dealt with the Rock plants,
    • Mr N. Catchpole made himself responsible for trees and shrubs;
    • Mr G.A Phillips for herbaceous plants,
    • Mrs Francis Perry for water plants,
    • Mr A.J. Macself for ferns,
    • Mr E. Cooper for orchids,
    • Mr J.S Dakers for annuals,
    • Miss Doreen Crowther for fruit and vegetables

with the aid of further information from other books, magazines and cross-checking on the internet.
In this edition of the book Sander's Encyclopaedia, the individual soil mixtures to grow plants have been retained, for it was considered that many gardeners might still wish to use them in certain circumstances. The John Innes mixtures may be substituted wherever desired. Details of these individual mixtures will be put into these galleries.