Ivydene Gardens Soft Fruit Gallery:
Introduction

"Grow Your Own Fruit" by Ken Muir, Honeypot Farm, Weeley Heath, Clacton-On-Sea, Essex. CO16 9BJ Tel: 01255 830181 provides the information on cultural practices in a clear and concise manner. It is strongly recommended that this booklet is read before growing Soft Fruit or Top Fruit, so that correct plants for your soil can be purchased by you and to give you a good fruit yield.

 

Choosing a soft fruit bush (Blueberry, Gooseberry, Blackcurrant, Redcurrant, Whitecurrant or Jostaberry) instead of a shrub from the shrub lists provides you with the size of shrub suitable for most current gardens.

The Raspberry may be used as a mini-hedge in the garden to separate areas or against your boundary fences/walls.

The Blackberry, Boysenberry and Tayberry cane climbers can also be used as mini-hedges or to clothe walls/fences/pergolas.

They all provide you with edible fruit.

 

Soil
Most fruits prefer a fairly neutral soil, pH of 6.5. Where possible, it is best to improve planting sites a month before the bushes/climbers arrive. Sandy soil should have plenty of organic matter incorporated (such as leaf compost from your garden, spent mushroom compost or bark from Gardenscape) to increase the water retention of the soil. On heavy clay soils try to incorporate a 2" layer of horticultural grit, sand and organic matter to aerate, and improve drainage through flocculation.

Earlies, mids, lates.

Choose varieties that can be eaten from July, or store well as cooked pies, jams or jellies.

Trained Soft Fruit

If space is limited and a 'sunny' wall or fence is available, soft fruit bushes can be 'trained' into forms such as cordons, espaliers and fans.

Best time to plant

The best time to plant is during the dormant season from mid-November to mid-March. Bare rooted plants have to be planted at this time, with no competition from other plants for 2 feet radius from their trunk. Container grown trees can in theory be planted anytime, but particular attention to watering will be neccessary; if planted from Spring to Summer.

Site

The ideal site would be a well sheltered South facing slope. More vigorous rootstocks have more root to provide better anchorage on exposed sites. All fruit bushes/climbers need good light to produce good quality fruit, and a site facing South or West is best. Gooseberries, Red Currants and Blackberries will all produce some fruit on a site facing North.

Soft Fruit Bush Form. Bush Form refers to the way in which the bush has been trained:-

  • Bush. Two year old Bush trees are trained as open centre (goblet shaped) trees with a clear stem of 2ft (0.6m). Suitable for relatively small trees on semi-dwarfing rootstocks for small and medium sized gardens.
  • Centre Leader. The centre leader has been maintained on these trees to allow training into dwarf pyramid and spindle bush forms. Suitable for trees on dwarfing rootstocks for small gardens or restricted spaces. These trees would require permanent support with a long stake.
  • Cordon. Cordons are single stem trees with short branches or spurs bearing fruit. They are usually planted as oblique cordons at an angle of 45-60 degrees to the ground, but can also be planted as vertical cordons sometimes referred to as minarettes (available from Ken Muir). They need a set of horizontal wires up to about 6ft (1.8m) for support. They also need appropriate summer pruning to maintain the cordon form. Cordons are very useful for small gardens, or for planting along fences.
  • Espalier (2 Tier). Espalier trees consist of a vertical stem and a set of horizontal arms or tiers extending either way bearing short lateral branches or spurs on which fruit is produced. The arms would typically be 18 inches (0.5m) apart. Two tier espaliers will have two sets of arms already partly trained and a continuing centre leader which would allow more sets of arms to be trained if required. They need a set of horizontal wires for support. They also need appropriate summer pruning to maintain and develop the form. Espaliers are very useful as a decorative feature on walls and fences.
  • Family Tree. Family trees have more than one variety of fruit grafted onto one rootsock, eg three different varieties of apple. The varieties are selected to cross pollinate so there is no need for a separate tree as a pollinator. They are useful for small gardens where there is room for only one tree.
  • Fan. Fan trained trees have been trained with several branches starting near the ground all in the same plane forming a fan shape. They need a set of horizontal wires for support. They also need appropriate summer pruning to maintain and develop the form. Fans are very useful as a decorative feature on walls and fences.
  • Half Standard. Half standard trees are trained as open centre (goblet shaped) trees with a clear stem of 4-5ft (1.3m-1.5m). Suitable for medium sized trees on semi-vigorous rootstocks for large or medium sized gardens.
  • Maiden. Maidens are untrained one year old trees. Some varieties naturally produce branches in the first year. These are known as feathered maidens. Other varieties do not and are referred to as maiden whips. Typically maiden apples, pears and cherries are 4-6ft (1.3-1.8m) in height. Maiden plums may be taller.

 

"Grow Your Own Fruit" by Ken Muir, Honeypot Farm, Weeley Heath, Clacton-On-Sea, Essex. CO16 9BJ Tel: 01255 830181 provides the information on cultural practices in a clear and concise manner

, as does The RHS Encyclopedia of Practical Gardening FRUIT by Harry Baker ISBN 1 85732 905 8.


"Success with Growing Fruit in containers" by Peter Himmelhuber ISBN 1-85391-797-4 shows which varieties of these fruits can be grown in pots with cultural practice information.

 

Thornless Blackberry canes can be supported on 4 heavy-gauge wires stretched between 3 inch by 3 inch posts at 3, 4, 5 and 6 feet from the ground. Use the front side to attach this year's canes to (which will bear fruit in the summer and autumn) and the back side of the wires to attach the new canes produced in the autumn for fruiting next year. Then next year, use the front side to take the new canes produced in the autumn of that year. Himalaya Giant variety is a very thorny variety, that could be used as a vandal-proof screen. Fruit can be eaten from the cane, cooked in pies or frozen.

Blackberry Name
(Rubus fruticosus) available from Ken Muir

Plant Form available throughout the year

Pick time

Description

Helen

Potted

Early to Mid-July

Combines fruit quality, earliness and yield. Large bright firm fruits, long and conical. Excellent flavour, rich and aromatic. Thornless canes and vigorous requiring 8 feet width by 6 feet of support.

Loch Ness

Potted

Late August - September

Thornless variety with stout erect canes requiring 6 feet x 6 feet of support. Heavy yielding, good flavour and large fruit.

 

Highbush Blueberries require a mixture of moss peat, coarse sand, soil and sawdust to fill their planting holes with. The bush will eventually have a height and spread of 5 feet. If your soil is acidic, then blueberries may be planted with your rhododendrons. If your soil is not acidic, then plant them in 1.5 feet deep containers with ericaceous compost. Anti-bird netting is required. Wait until the fruit has been blue for a week before picking individual berries, and then returning to pick on subsequent days. Use in pies or tarts.

Blueberry Name
(Vaccinium corymbosum) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Blue Crop

3 litre potted Bush

Early-Mid August

Large light blue fruit. Good flavour and bronze autumn colour. Vigorous upright grower.

Chandler

3 litre potted Bush

Late July

Bronze-red Spring foliage slowly turning green that sets off the cream flowers. Enormous cherry-sized fruit and excellent flavour. Picking over a 4-6 week period.

 

Gooseberries are usually the first fruit of the season. The fruit should be thinned in late May and the thinnings used for cooking. The remainder should be left to swell to full size and then used for pies, jamming and freezing.

Gooseberry Name
(Ribes uva-crispa var. reclinatum) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Hinomaki Yellow

Bare Root Bush

July

With it's red sister, this variety is excellent for organic growing, with high mildew resistance.

Invicta

3 litre potted Bush

Late July

Large pale green fruits for cooking, jam or freezing. Heavy cropper, mildew resistant, prickly stems, vigorous and spreading.

Rokula

Bare Root Bush

Early July

An early dessert variety of excellent flavour. Resistant to mildew, but slightly susceptible to fruit cracking in heavy rain.

Martlet

3 litre potted Bush

July

This is a red form with part Invicta parentage. Has excellent dessert fruit quality (hairless) with good resistance to American gooseberry mildew and leaf spot.

Pax

3 litre potted Bush

July

Red, sweet and medium size. A new red gooseberry of excellent quality and resistant to mildew and leaf spot. Plants are vigorous and spreading, so need to shaped by pruning. Young plants and new shoots have thorns, but become virtually thornless once mature.

 

Raspberries are borne on the current season's canes, so the current year's canes must be removed to the ground in October and the new canes then should be supported on the other side of the 3 horizontal support wires.

Raspberry Name
(Rubus idaeus) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Allgold

Bare Root Cane

September

A yellow autumn fruiting primocane similar in habit to Autumn Bliss, but slightly sweeter.

Autumn Bliss

Bare Root Cane

Early August to October.

An early autumn fruiting variety picked from early August to October. Heavy cropper. Outstanding.

Glen Prosen

Bare Root Cane

Mid July-Mid August

Superb quality. Easy to pick from thornless canes of moderate vigour.

Glen Ample

Bare Root Cane

August

High yielding thornless variety with large fleshy quality. Fruit picking over a long period.

Joan J

Bare Root Cane

Late July-Mid September

Very similar to Autumn Bliss but an earlier season. An outstanding primocane with fruits of a superb size and flavour. Starts cropping at the end of July for a 7 week period.

Tulameen

Bare Root Cane

September

Medium to large fruits of good quality. Few spines(thorns). Long picking season.

 

Blackcurrants are grown on a stool system - that is, many shoots spring from below the ground rather than from a single stem. A well-grown blackcurrant bush may reach 5-6 feet in height and spread and should last 15 years before needing replacement. The site should be frost-free and sheltered from strong winds so that pollination by bees is not affected. They produce the best fruit from wood produced in the previous summer, so prune in early autumn.

Blackcurrant Name
(Ribes nigrum) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Baldwin

3 litre Bush

Late July

Medium sized berries hang well. Good for Vitamin C. Still the best flavoured blackcurrant.

Ben Connan

3 litre Bush

Mid July

Carries high yields of exceptionally large fruit on compact bushes. It has good frost, pest and mildew disease resistance and is very suitable as a garden variety.

Ben Sarek

3 litre Bush

Mid July

High yielding variety with large fruit carried on easily picked short strigs. Produces neat, compact bushes, which rarely grow more than 3 feet in height. Frost and mildew resistant.

 

Redcurrants are grown as an open-centred bush on a 4-6 inch stem or leg, rather like a miniature apple with a height and spread of 5-6 feet. A well-grown redcurrant bush should last 10 years before its yield reduces and thus needs replacement. The site should be frost-free and sheltered from strong winds so that pollination by bees is not affected. The fruit buds are produced in clusters at the base of the one-year old shoots and on short spurs on the older wood. Therefore, their is a permanent framework of branches for this fruiting habit.

Redcurrant Name
(Ribes rubrum) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Laxtons No 1

Bare Root Bush

July

Most mildew resistant and of good quality. Heavy cropper.

Red Lake

Bare Root Bush

July-August

Sweet and Juicy with good flavour. Heavy cropper with long strigs. Very reliable.

Redstart

Bare Root Bush

August

Late ripening and highly recommended for jelly making.

 

Whitecurrants are grown as an open-centred bush on a 4-6 inch stem or leg, rather like a miniature apple with a height and spread of 5-6 feet. A well-grown whitecurrant bush should last 10 years before its yield reduces and thus needs replacement. The site should be frost-free and sheltered from strong winds so that pollination by bees is not affected. The fruit buds are produced in clusters at the base of the one-year old shoots and on short spurs on the older wood. Therefore, their is a permanent framework of branches for this fruiting habit.

Whitecurrant Name
(Ribes rubrum) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

White Versailles

Bare Root Bush

July

Sweet with long abundant strigs. Heavy cropper. Reliable.

 

Boysenberry. is a Raspberry x Blackberry cross. Useful on light sandy soils. Grown the same way as a blackberry.

Boysenberry Name available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Boysenberry

3 litre Bush

July-August.

This thornless selection carries large round or oblong fruit. Purplish-Black in colour and with a characteristic, attractive flavour similar to a wild blackberry. Drought resistant and hardy.

 

Jostaberry is a Gooseberry x Blackcurrant cross. Jostaberries are grown on a stool system - that is, many shoots spring from below the ground rather than from a single stem. A well-grown jostaberry bush may reach 5-6 feet in height and spread and should last 15 years before needing replacement. The site should be frost-free and sheltered from strong winds so that pollination by bees is not affected. They produce the best fruit from wood produced in the previous summer, so prune in early autumn.

Jostaberry Name
(Ribes x culverwellii) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Jostaberry

Bare Root

July

A thornless hybrid with shiny black fruit, the size of a small gooseberry. Resistant to American gooseberry mildew, blackcurrant leafspot, big bud mite and blackcurrant gall mite. Strong growing but needs protection from early frosts. Good for jam making.

 

Tayberry is a Raspberry x Blackberry cross. Excellent for the small garden. The stems are slightly thorny. Grow the same way as blackberries.

Tayberry Name
(Rubus) available from Brogdale Horticultural Trust
www.brog-dale.org

Plant Form Availability

Pick time

Description

Medana

3 litre Bush

Late August

This is a superior virus-free Medana form, which picks early. Large and juicy fruit, with a mild sweet flavour. It is juicier but sharper flavoured than raspberry. The fruit ripens over a long period in July and August. For best flavour, it should be allowed to fully ripen to a dark red colour before picking. It is best used for jams and summer puddings, but can also be eaten fresh.

This plant gallery has thumbnail pictures of soft fruit blossoms in the following colours:-

This plant gallery has thumbnail pictures of soft fruit foliage in the following colours:-

This plant gallery has thumbnail pictures of soft fruit plant fruit with its colour:-

This plant gallery has pictures of flower beds with Soft Fruit with description.

These gallery photographs of Soft Fruit were provided by ACT Publishing, Lion House, Church Street, Maidstone, Kent. ME14 1EN.
Tel: 01622 695656
Email fruit@actpub.co.uk
who publish the following for United Kingdom commercial growers:-

  • The Fruit Grower
  • The Vegetable Farmer
  • The Commercial Greenhouse Grower
  • The Berry Yearbook
  • The Potato Yearbook
  • The Vegetable Yearbook and
  • The Greenhouse Yearbook

 

Soft Fruit Height from Text Border

Blue =
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms)

Green=
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms)

Red =
72+ inches
(180+ cms)

Soft Fruit Soil Moisture from Text Background

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil

Click on thumbnail to add the Soft Fruit Description Page of the Soft Fruit named in the Text box below that photo.
The Comments Row of that Soft Fruit Description Page details where that Soft Fruit is available from.

 

 

 

 

 

Soft Fruit INDEX link to Soft Fruit Plant Description Page

Botanical Name / Common Name

Flower Colour / Flower Period

Fruit Colour / Month for Picking

Height x Spread in inches (cms)
(1 inch = 2.5 cms,
12 inches = 1 foot
12 inches = 30 cms,
24 inches = 2 feet,
3 feet = 1 yard,
40 inches = 100 cms)

Foliage Colour

A, B,

 

 

 

 

 

B

Bluecrop / Blueberry

White /
Spring

Blue-black / Late July

cbluecropfrusblueberryg1a1

cbluecropfrublueberryg2a1

48-72 x 48
(120-180 x 120)

Glossy Green with Bronze Autumn foliage

cbluecropfolblueberryg1a1

Hardiblue / Blueberry

White /
Spring

Dark Blue /
Late July

chardybluefrusblueberryg1a1

chardybluefrublueberryg2a1

...

Green becomes brilliant yellow-orange in autumn

chardybluefol1blueberryg1a1

C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R,

 

 

 

 

 

S

Figaro in de grondlteelt / Strawberry

...

Orange Bright Red /
June

cfigarofrusstrawberryg1a1

cfigarofrustrawberryg1a1

...

Bright Green

Sonata / Strawberry

...

Red /
June

csonataforstrawberryg1a1

csonatafrustrawberryg1a1

...

Dark Green

Florence / Strawberry

...

Dark Red and firm /
July

cflorencefrusstrawberryg1a1

cflorencefrustrawberryg1a1

10 x 10
(25 x 25)

Dark Green

T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

Site design and content copyright ©November 2008. Page structure amended January 2013. Feet changed to inches (cms) July 2015. Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

SOFT FRUIT GALLERY PAGES
Site Map of pages with content(o)


BLOSSOM COLOUR
Orange
Other Colour
Pink
Red
(o)White
Yellow
 

FOLIAGE COLOUR
Bronze
(o)Green
Purple
Yellow

TRAINING OF SOFT FRUIT PLANT
Blackberry 6 feet

Blackcurrant Bush
(o)Blueberry Bush
Cranberry Shrub
Goosebery Standard
Goosebery Bush
Goosebery Cordon
Goosebery Stooled
Grapes Glasshouse
Grapes Outdoor
Hybrid Berry 6 feet
Kiwifruit Espalier
Raspberry 4 feet
Strawberry Early Summer
(o)Strawberry Midsummer
(o)Strawberry Late Summer
Strawberry Perpetual
Rhubarb

FRUIT COLOUR
Green
Orange
(o)Other Colours
(o)Red
Yellow

SOFT FRUIT BED PICTURES
Garden Pictures


Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines
 

Topic
Case Studies
...Drive Foundations
Ryegrass and turf kills plants within Roadstone and in Topsoil due to it starving and dehydrating them.
CedarGravel creates stable drive surface and drains rain into your ground, rather than onto the public road.

8 problems caused by building house on clay or with house-wall attached to clay.
Pre-building work on polluted soil.

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden
Construction

with ground drains
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
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Borders

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......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden
Maintenance

Glossary with a tomato teaching cauliflowers
Home
Library of over 1000 books
Offbeat Glossary with DuLally Bird in its flower clock.
Plants
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......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
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(Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
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Soil
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Interaction between 2 Quartz Sand Grains to make soil
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How roots of plants are in control in the soil
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Without replacing Soil Nutrients, the soil will break up to only clay, sand or silt
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Subsidence caused by water in Clay
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Tool Shed with 3 kneeling pads
Useful Data with benefits of Seaweed

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Topic - Plant Photo Galleries

Topic - Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens with
Camera Photo Galleries are in the last row


Bulb with its 7 Flower Colours per Month Comparison Pages
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......Eur Non-classified
......American A
......American B
......American C
......American D
......American E
......American F
......American G
......American H
......American I
......American J
......American K
......American L
......American M
......American N
......American O
......American P
......American Q
......American R
......American S
......American T
......American U
......American V
......American W
......American XYZ
......Ame Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India

......Lithuania
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil

Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria ‚Ä®...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias


Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Greenhouse or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering inside House during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection


........

If the plant type below has flowers, then the first gallery will include the flower thumbnail in each month of 1 of 6 flower colour comparison pages of each plant in its subsidiary galleries
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

Climber in
3 Sector Vertical Plant System
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use with 3 separate rose indices on each usage of rose page
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower is below

The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process
dependent on the Garden Style chosen

Garden Style
...
Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...
All Plants Index
...
Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...
Shape, Form
Index

or
use the choices in the following Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12 - My Gas Service Engineer found Flow and Return pipes incorrectly positioned on gas boilers and customers had refused to have positioning corrected in 2020, followed by this Website
...User Guidelines
or
Bee instead of wind pollinated plants for hay-fever sufferers
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
or
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos
or
A Foliage Colour Wheel using 212 web-safe colours instead of the best Colour Wheel of 2058 colours in the Pantone Goe System
All Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

Topic - Butterfly Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note

Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

You can find the wild flower in one of the 23 Wild Flower Galleries or the Colour Wheel
Gallery

If
you know its name, use
Wild Flower Plant Index a-h,
Wild Flower Plant Index i-p or
Wild Flower Plant Index q-z

you know which habitat it lives in,
use
Wild Flowers on
Acid Soil
Habitat Table,
on Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on Marine Soil,
on Neutral Soil,
is a Fern,
is a Grass,
is a Rush, or
is a Sedge

you know which family it belongs to, use
Wild Flower Family Pages menu above and right

you have seen its flower or seed, use
Comparison Pages
in Wild Flower
Gallery
to identify it or

you have seen its flower, use Comparison Pages containing Wild Flower Plants and Cultivated Plants in the Colour Wheel Gallery

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

There are 180 families in the Wildflowers of the UK and they have been split up into 22 Galleries to allow space for up to 100 plants per gallery.

Each plant named in each of the Wildflower Family Pages may have a link to:-

its Plant Description Page in its Common Name in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links

to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name,

to see photos in its Flowering Months and

to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1
(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2
(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3
(o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3
(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4
Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

Topic - Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag to your desktop:-

RHS Garden at Wisley
Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year. Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.
Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32
,
Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1
with Plant Supports
1
, 5, 10
Plants
2
, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall
Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden
Roses Pages
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger
Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52
,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,

R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1
, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54
,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26
, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38
, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166


Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord
Garden Flowers - Pages
A1, 2, 3, 4,
5,
6, 7, 8, 9,
10,
11, 12, 13,

The plant with photo in the above Camera Photo Galleries
join

the plants with photos in the other Plant Photo Galleries below in

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens
A 1, Photos
B 1, Photos
C 1, Photos
D 1, Photos
E 1, Photos
F 1, Photos
G 1, Photos
H 1, Photos
I 1, Photos
J 1, Photos
K 1, Photos
L 1, Photos
M 1, Photos
N 1, Photos
O 1, Photos
P 1, Photos
Q 1, Photos
R 1, Photos
S 1, Photos
T 1, Photos
U 1, Photos
V 1, Photos
W 1, Photos
X 1 Photos
Y 1, Photos
Z 1 Photos
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens

Flower Colour, Number of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-

Rock Garden
...within linked page


Bedding

...Bedding Out
...Filling In
...Screen-ing
...Pots and Troughs
...Window Boxes
...Hanging Baskets
...Spring Bedding
...Summer Bedding
...Winter Bedding
...Foliage instead of Flower
...
Coleus Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

Bulb
...Other than Only Green Foliage
...Bedding or Mass Planting
...Ground-Cover
...Cut-Flower
...Tolerant of Shade
...In Woodland Areas
...Under-plant
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Covering Banks
...In Water
...Beside Stream or Water Garden
...Coastal Conditions
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border or Back-ground Plant
...Fragrant Flowers
...Not Fragrant Flowers
...Indoor
House-plant

...Grow in a Patio Pot
...Grow in an Alpine Trough
...Grow in an Alpine House
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Speciman Plant
...Into Native Plant Garden
...Naturalize in Grass
...Grow in Hanging Basket
...Grow in Window-box
...Grow in Green-house
...Grow in Scree
...Naturalized Plant Area
...Grow in Cottage Garden
...Attracts Butterflies
...Attracts Bees
...Resistant to Wildlife
...Bulb in Soil:-
......Chalk
......Clay
......Sand
......Lime-Free (Acid)
......Peat

Rose
...
Bedding
...
Climber /Pillar
...
Cut-Flower
...
Exhibition, Speciman
...
Ground-Cover

...
Grow In A Container
...
Hedge
...
Climber in Tree
...
Woodland
...
Edging Borders
...
Tolerant of Poor Soil
...
Tolerant of Shade
...
Back of Border
...
Adjacent to Water
...
Page for rose use as ARCH ROSE, PERGOLA ROSE, COASTAL CONDITIONS ROSE, WALL ROSE, STANDARD ROSE, COVERING BANKS or THORNLESS ROSES.
...
FRAGRANT ROSES
...
NOT FRAGRANT ROSES

and

Plant Colour Wheel Uses
with
1. Perfect general use soil is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt.

Uses of Plant and Flower Shape:-
...Foliage Only
...Other than Green Foliage
...Trees in Lawn
...Trees in Small Gardens
...Wildflower Garden
...Attract Bi
rd
...Attract Butterfly
1
, 2
...Climber on House Wall

...
Climber not on House Wall
...Climber in Tree
...Rabbit-Resistant
...Woodland
...Pollution Barrier
...Part Shade
...Full Shade
...Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3
...Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>
180cm
...Hedge
...Wind-swept
...Covering Banks
...Patio Pot
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border
...Poisonous

...Adjacent to Water
...Bog Garden
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Winter-Flowering
...Fragrant
...Not Fragrant
...Exhibition

...
Standard Plant
is 'Ball on Stick'
...
Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves
...
Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal
...
Coastal Conditions
...
Tolerant on North-facing Wall
...
Cut Flower
...
Potted Veg Outdoors
...
Potted Veg Indoors
...
Thornless
...
Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
...
Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F
, G-L, M-R,
S-Z
...
Grow in Acidic Soil
...
Grow in Any Soil
...
Grow in Rock Garden
...
Grow Bulbs Indoors

Fragrant Plants:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2