Ivydene Gardens Photo coleus 2 Gallery:
Page 30 has photos from the
Coleus Bedding Trial Folder in Plant Trials Field in Garden at Wisley taken on 2 October 2013
with Table of Annuals of Spreading/Sprawling Habit.


Photos taken by Chris Garnons-Williams using a digital camera in the original size and as a thumbnail.
These can used in the Public Domain for educational purposes in schools, or at home, to:-

  • Assist in selecting a plant.
  • To be used in providing details of plants and their colours for use in a painting,
  • in Jewellery,
  • in the shape of plants in stone, metal or ceramic statuary,
  • pictures on homemade greetings cards, or
  • posters for display on walls at home.

Row 1 (Odd Row) has the Pass-Through Camera image of Thumbnail image named in Row 2
and is displayed full size of usually 4000 x 3000 pixels. You can then scan this
image from side to side and up and down of this full photo on your screen.

Row 2 (Even Row) has same image reduced to fit the image frame of 400 x 300 pixels as a
Passthrough Thumbnail to show all of the Camera Image in a smaller space.
Remember that the Passthrough Thumbnail has been reduced to 72 pixels per inch
by the Freeway Program, whereas the Passthrough Camera Image is the same as
it was when it was transferred from the Camera. Since it is only 72 pixels per inch,
the Passthrough Thumbnail cannot be published in commercial publications, whereas the
Passthrough Camera Image can.

Click on either image and drag to your desktop.
Then you can crop the Pass-Through Camera image to obtain the particular detail
that you require from that image, before using that cropped result in your endeavour.

Copying the pages and then clicking on the images to drag them may not work.
 

solenostemoncoleus88IMG9829

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 88 IMG 9829.JPG
'Pineapplette Red'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus88IMG9829beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus88IMG9830

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 88 IMG 9830.JPG
'Pineapplette Red'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus88IMG9830beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus88IMG9831

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 88 IMG 9831.JPG
'Pineapplette Red'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus88IMG9831beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus89IMG9832

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 89 IMG 9832.JPG
'Purple Oak'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus89IMG9832beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus89IMG9833

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 89 IMG 9833.JPG
'Purple Oak'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus89IMG9833beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus89IMG9834

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 89 IMG 9834.JPG
'Purple Oak'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus89IMG9834beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus90IMG9835

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 90 IMG 9835.JPG
'Red Velvet'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus90IMG9835beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus90IMG9836

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 90 IMG 9836.JPG
'Red Velvet'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus90IMG9836beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

solenostemoncoleus90IMG9837

Coleus Bedding Trial Solenostemon 90 IMG 9837.JPG
'Red Velvet'
Wednesday 2 October 2013 at RHS Wisley Garden Trials Ground

dColeus90IMG9837beddingtrialsolenostemongarnonswilliams

 

I have copied the archived post below, because what is stated there is extremely important, since 99.99% of gardeners in the UK totally ignore the fact that plants require humus and think that double-digging is beneficial every year. That is why they are killing their soil and their plants do not grow well.

How Soil Works in the Category Archives: Flowering House Plants of Houseplantsguru. com:-

"Nature’s plan is to build up the humus year after year and this can only be done by organic matter. There is need to replace and return that which has been taken out. The Chinese, who are the best gardeners, collect, ‘use’, and return to the soil, every possible kind of waste, vegetable, animal and human. In over 4000 years of intensive cultivation they still support more human beings per hectare than any other country in the world! On the other hand in areas like the Middle West of the U.S.A. And the Regina Plain of Canada, where the Wheel of Life has not been recognized, tens of thousands of hectares which once grew heavy crops are now useless, or practically so.

Every flower crop grown reduces the organic content of the ground. Every piece of work done helps to break down the humus. The value of the soil in your garden, therefore, is not the mica particles or grains of sand. It lies in the humus that the soil contains. Humus makes all the difference to successful gardening. Have plenty of humus present and the soil is in good tilth. Humus is the organic colloid of the soil. It can store water, it can store plant foods, it can help to keep the soil open. It can help to ensure the right aeration. It will give ideal insulation against heat and cold.

Using Compost

Garden owners proposing to dig their land shallowly in preparation for flower growing, should realize the importance of adding ample quantities of organic matter before they start. Composted farmyard manure, fine wool shoddy, properly composted vegetable refuse, or hop manure should be added at the rate of one good barrow-load to 10 m2 (12 sq yds) and in addition into the top 25 or 50 mm (1 or 2 in) of soil finely divided sedge peat, non-acid in character should be raked in at about half a bucketful (9 litres) per square metre (2 gallons per sq yd). This organic matter in the top few millimetres of soil gives the little roots a good start and so sends them on to find the organic matter below.

It is when the organic content of the soil has been helped in this way, that the gardener dares to add plant foods of an organic origin. These are usually applied on the surface of the ground and raked in. Fertilizers with an organic base are particularly useful. Fish Manure may be applied at 105 to 140 g/m2 (3 oz to 4 oz per sq yd), or a meat and bone meal or even hoof and horn meal mixed with equal quantities of wood ashes may be used at a similar rate. These plant foods can be supplied not only when the flower garden is first made but every season very early in the spring. A good dried poultry manure to which a little potash has been added is another fertilizer that is very useful when applied at this time.

Minimum Digging

Flower growers must realize that proper soil treatment is the first essential to success. The millions and millions of soil bacteria that live in the ground to help the gardener, much appreciate little or no digging. It enables them to work better, for they need conditions which are natural. So do give them what they need.

Liming

Lime should be regarded as an essential except in very definite cases where acidity is demanded, e.g. the heaths and heathers, rhododendrons and azaleas.

Lime not only prevents soil from being acid but it ‘sweetens’ it, as well as playing its part as a plant food. It improves the texture and workability of heavy soils. It helps to release other plant foods, and it decomposes organic compounds in the soil so that they can be used as plant food also.

Generally speaking it should be applied at about 245 g/m2 (7 oz per sq yd). It should not be dug in, as it washes down into the soil very quickly. It should be sprinkled on the surface of the ground after the digging and manuring has been done. Do not mix lime with organic fertilizers. There are three main types of lime: Quicklime, sometimes sold as Buxton Lime or Lump Lime, which has to , be slaked down on the soil; Chalk or Limestone, often sold as Ground Limestone, only half as valuable as quicklime; and Hydrated Lime, which is perhaps the most convenient j to handle and is therefore most usually used by gardeners. The quantity of lime mentioned previously i.e. 245 g/m2 (7 oz per sq yd), refers to hydrated lime."

 

 

Annuals with Spreading or Sprawling Habit

Annual Botanical Name

Bedding Common Name

Height in inches (cms)

Flowering Months

Comments

Catharanthus roseus

Vinca, Periwinkle

12 (30)

Jun-Sep

Star-shaped flowers are flowering continuously. Blossoms are mostly white, pink, or purple with contrasting red centres on plants that freely branch sideways.
Popular for edging beds and borders, also as a
groundcover and for
cascading from window boxes.

Spreading Habit.

Convolvulus tricolor

Dwarf Morning Glory, Bindweed

4-20 (10-50)

Jun-Sep

A bushy, spreading annual or short-lived perennial with funnel-shaped, royal blue flowers, up to 4cm across, are feathered white towards the base of the petals, with a yellow eye. Each only lasts a day, but they are borne in succession over a long period in summer. The flowers open during the day and close again at the end of the afternoon. It is known for attracting bees, beneficial insects and other pollinators. It nectar-pollen-rich-flowers.
Good for beds and borders as well as banks and slopes with impoverished dry sites in full sun only.
Use in coastal gardens and in pots. The trailing variety is suitable for a hanging basket.
Spreading habit.

Datura metel

Angel's Trumpet

24-36 (60-90)

Jul-Oct

White trumpet-shaped flowers up to 6 inches (15 cms) long are borne freely all summer.
Good accent for mixed beds and borders.
Suitable for growing in containers.
Caution: all parts are poisonous.
Mounded, sprawling habit.

Dorotheanus bellidiformis

Livingstone Daisy

6 (15)

Jun

Flowers have shimmering petals, borne in such profusion that they completely hide the foliage. Colours include purple, pink, orange, apricot, and yellow, plus bicolours.
Good for edging low beds and borders.
Spreading Habit.

Dyssodia tenuiloba (Thymophylla tenuiloba)

Dahlberg Daisy, Bristleleaf pricklyleaf, Small bristleleaf pricklyleaf, Golden fleece, Shooting star

6 (15)

Jun to frost

Dainty yellow flowers are borne in great profusion all summer on airy plants that hug the ground.
The perfect choice for beds and borders. Superb for baskets, containers and window boxes.
Wonderful for combination plantings. Companion plants are Mondo Grass, Red Valerian and Leadplant.
Annual ground cover.
Bedding or edging plant.
Good drought-tolerant plant for rock gardens or desert gardens.
Spreading habit.

Eschscholzia californica

California-poppy

12 (30)

May-Jun

Poppy-like flowers have a satin sheen. Colours include yellow, orange, pink, white, and red.
Popular for massing in beds and borders, also wildflower meadows.
spreading habit.

Gazania rigens

Rainbow Daisy

12 (30)

Jul-Sep

Shimmering flowers are mostly yellow, orange, pink, red, and mahogany with black zone around the petal centre.
Good for mixed beds and borders.
Spreading habit.

Impatiens wallerana

Patience Plant

Up to
36 (90)

May-Oct

Plants bloom continuously and are covered with single and double flowers, some varieties having solid colours and others possessing bicoloured flowers.
Popular for massing in beds and borders.
Some varieties good for container planting, including hanging baskets.
Dwarf varieties make sensational ground cover.
Most widely planted flowering annual for shade.
Bushy, spreading habit.

Lobularia maritima

Alyssum

6 (15)

Apr-Oct

Masses of dainty white, pink, or purple flowers are borne in such profusion they often completely hide the foliage.
Extremely popular as an edging for beds and borders.
Also good for hanging baskets and other container plantings.
Grows among paving stones and along dry walls.
Mounded, spreading habit.

Moluccella laevis

Bells-of-Ireland

36 (90)

Jun-Sep

Slender flower spikes are crowded with ornamental, bell-shaped, green flower bracts.
Popular accent in beds and borders.
Valued for cutting and dried flower arrangements
Bushy, spreading habit.

Phlox drummondii

Phlox

12 (30)

Jun

Flowers are produced in clusters on short stems. Colours include red, white, pink, and purple plus bicolours.
Popular for massing in beds and borders,
also rock gardens.
Spreading habit

Portulaca grandiflora

Moss Rose

6 (15)

Jun-Sep

Shimmering rose-like flowers are borne in profusion on succulent plants. Colour range includes, red, white, yellow, orange, and purple.
Popular for edging beds and borders.
Also suitable for window boxes and other container plantings.
Spreading habit.

Sanvitalia procumbens

Creeping Zinnia

6 (15)

Jun-Oct

Dainty daisy-like flowers are bright yellow with black centres.
Creates a beautiful ground cover.
Popular for edging beds and borders.
Suitable for window boxes and rock gardens since plants will cascade.
Spreading habit.

Tropaeolum majus

Nasturtium

12 (30)

Jun-Oct

Flowers can be single- or double-flowered, with or without spurs. Plants with spurless flowers tend to display better because the flowers always face up. Colour range includes red, yellow, orange, apricot, white, pink, and mahogany.
Suitable for low beds and borders,
also containers.
Tall kinds can be used to cover trellises and fences.
Spreading habit.

Verbena x hybrida

Summer Verbena

12 (30)

Jul-Sep

Primrose-like florets are arranged in flat clusters. Colour range includes white, red, pink, blue, and purple with white centres.
Popular for massing in beds and borders,
and for edging.
Suitable for containers, especially window boxes.
Spreading habit.

Zinnia angustifolia

Classic Zinnia

12 (30)

Jul-Sep

Small, single orange flowers are borne in profusion on low-growing, ground-hugging plants.
Popular for edging beds and borders and as a ground cover to decorate dry slopes.
Good for containers, particularly window boxes.
Spreading habit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Range, Culture and Description Details of each of the above are within
Essential Annuals The 100 best for Design and Cultivation.
Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell.
Published by Crescent Books in 1989. ISBN 0-517-66177-2

BEDDING PLANT GALLERY PAGES

Site Map of pages with content (o)

Introduction

FOLIAGE COLOUR
(o)Black
.Blue
(o)Brown
(o)Bronze
(o)Green
.Grey
(o)Purple
(o)Red
.Silver
(o)Variegated
.White
.Yellow

SEED COLOUR
Seed with EXTRA Plant INDEX of Extra Plants in Extra Pages of Bloom and Blooms Calendar Galleries.

BEDS WITH PICTURES
Garden

 


Website Structure Explanation and User Guidelines

BEDDING PLANT GALLERY PAGES

Flower Colour

Bicolour

Blue

Green

Orange

Other Colours

Pink

Purple

Red

White

White / Bicolour

Yellow

 

 

 

Flower Simple Shape

3 Petals

4 Petals

5 Petals

6 Petals

Stars

Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Globes, Goblets and Chalices

irisflotpseudacorus1a1a

aethionemacfloarmenumfoord1a1a

anemonecflo1hybridafoord1a1a

 

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a1a1

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1a1a1a1a1

paeoniamlokosewitschiiflot1a1a1

Trumpets and Funnels

Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Single Flower provides pollen for bees

 

2 Petals

 

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord1a1a1

digitalismertonensiscflorvroger1a1a

 

anagalisflotcskylover1a1a1

 

cupheacflollaveakavanagh1a1a

 

Flower Elabor-ated Shape

Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Hats, Hoods and Helmets

Standards, Wings and Keels

Discs and Florets

Pin-cushions and Tufts

Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

prunellaflotgrandiflora1a1a

aquilegiacfloformosafoord1a1a

acanthusspinosuscflocoblands1a1a

lathyrusflotvernus1a1a

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock1a1a

echinaceacflo1purpurealustrehybridsgarnonswilliams1a1a

argyranthemumflotcmadeiracrestedyellow1a1a

Bedding Plant Use

Bedding Out

Filling In

Screen-ing

Pots and Troughs

Window Boxes

Hanging Baskets

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Winter Bedding

 


Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain

 

Bedding Plant Height from Text Border Gallery

Blue =
0-24 inches
(0-60 cms)

Green =
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms) or
Green =
24-72 inches
(60-180 cms)

Red =
72+ inches
(180+ cms)
 

Bedding Plant Soil Moisture from Text Background

 

Wet Soil

Moist Soil

Dry Soil

Click on thumbnail to change this Comparison Page to the Plant Description Page of the Bedding Plant named in the Text box below that photo.


The Comments Row of that Bedding Plant Description Page details where that Bedding Plant is available from.

 

 

Bedding Plant INDEX .

See also the Bedding Plant INDEX of the Bedding in the Mixed Borders of the Royal Horticultural Society Garden at Wisley in 2013. This gallery also compares the Flower Colours, Foliage Colours, Bedding Use and Flower Shape of the bedding plants in those Mixed Borders.

 

Site design and content copyright ©June 2019.
Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a
courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are
not responsible for the content and/or quality of external
web sites linked from this site.  


Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction

Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports

Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

................

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries with many
Camera Photo Galleries just before the Wildflower Family Pages

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens
A 1, Photos
B 1, Photos
C 1, Photos
D 1, Photos
E 1, Photos
F 1, Photos
G 1, Photos
H 1, Photos
I 1, Photos
J 1, Photos
K 1, Photos
L 1, Photos
M 1, Photos
N 1, Photos
O 1, Photos
P 1, Photos
Q 1, Photos
R 1, Photos
S 1, Photos
T 1, Photos
U 1, Photos
V 1, Photos
W 1, Photos
X 1 Photos
Y 1, Photos
Z 1 Photos
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens
Flower Shape and Plant Use of
Bedding
Bulb
Evergreen Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Rose



Aquatic
Bamboo

 


Bedding
...by Flower Shape

...Camera photos of Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial *

Further details on Bedding from the Infill Galleries:-
...for Spring
...for Summer
...for Autumn
...for Winter
...for Sandy Soil
...for Acid Soil
...for Chalky Soil
...for Clay Soil
...Flower Colour:-
......Black
......Blue
......Orange
......Pink
......Purple
......Red
......White
......Yellow
......Multi-coloured
...Use of Bedding:-
......Aromatic Fol
......Scented Flo
......Long Flo
......Coloured Fol
......for Bees, etc
......Cut Flos
......Hanging Pot
......Pots/ Troughs
......Screening
......Window Box
......Bedding Out
......Filling in

Further details on Annuals from the Infill Galleries:-
Uses of Annuals

...Exposed Sites
...Sheltered Sites
...in Greenhouse
...Extra Poor Soil
...Very Rich Soil
...Gap Filling
...Patio Pots
...Cut Flowers 1, 2
...Everlasting Flos
...Attract Insects
...with Fragrance
...Bee Pollinated
...Annual Pairing
...Low-Growing
...Med-Growing
...Tall Growing
...Flower Colour:-
......Black/Brown
......Blue-Purple
......Green
......Red-Pink
......White
......Yellow/Orange
...for its Foliage
...in Moist Soil
...in Shade
...as Houseplants
...Edging Beds
...Hanging Basket
...Vining Annuals
...Plants for Cut Flowers which flower during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
Further Details on Biennials from the Infill Galleries:-
Use of Bieenials

...Cottage Garden
...Cut Flower
...for Rock Work
...Patio Pots
...Conservatory
...for Wildlife
...Scented Flo



Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
...P -Herbaceous
...RHS Wisley
...Flower Shape
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

Camera Photo Galleries:-
Wisley Plant Supports
Wisley Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial
Sissinghurst Plant Supports

 

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

Picture Folder Name Pages:-

Since 14 June 2019 I have also started to put my own full-sized 4000 x 3000 digital Camera images into the relevant topics in this website again for use in the Public Domain - since there may be 9 or more to a page the resulting 43Mb website page may take some time to load. Since I have more than 26,522 photos using 111,460Mb of my disk space, then the extra upfront cost per annum before creating more folders like Photo coleus is just over 3.16 pence per photo has been paid for the total number in that entire photo collection before any are sent to the website.
It is hoped that you may find them of interest.

Plant Supports Folder from RHS
Garden at Wisley taken on
11 April 2013
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-16 was correct.
Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15


Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial Folder
from Plant Trials Field in RHS Garden
at Wisley taken on
2 October 2013
1, plus Tables of Annuals with/for:-
2, Blue to Purple Flowers
3, Red to Pink Flowers 1, 2
4, Green Flowers
5, Black or Brown Flowers
6, Yellow, and Orange Flowers
7, White Flowers
8,
9, Low-Growing
10,
11, Medium-Growing
12, Tall-Growing
13, Heat-Tolerant
14, Moist Soil
15, Shade
16, Indoors
17, Cutting
18, Naturalize
19, Decorative Foliage
20, Edging
21, Fragrance
22, Hanging Baskets
23, Vining
24, Wildflower Meadows
25, Coastal Gardens
26, Mounded Habit
27, Erect Habit
28, Clump-Forming Habit
29, Compact/Bushy Habit
30, Spreading/Sprawling Habit
31, To Cover Fences
32, Odds and Sods 1, 2
Coleus Bedding trial Index
Range, Culture and Description Details of each of the above are within
Essential Annuals The 100 best for Design and Cultivation.
Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell.
Published by Crescent Books in 1989. ISBN 0-517-66177-2

 

Bedding Gallery has
other bedding plants, in their
flower colour,
flower shape and
bedding plant use
pages.

 

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

Further details on Bedding from the Infill Plants Galleries of the above topic:-
...for Spring
...for Summer
...for Autumn
...for Winter
...for Sandy Soil
...for Acid Soil
...for Chalky Soil
...for Clay Soil
...Flower Colour:-
......Black
......Blue
......Orange
......Pink
......Purple
......Red
......White
......Yellow
......Multi-coloured
...Use of Bedding:-
......Aromatic Fol
......Scented Flo
......Long Flo
......Coloured Fol
......for Bees, etc
......Cut Flos
......Hanging Pot
......Pots/ Troughs
......Screening
......Window Box
......Bedding Out
......Filling in

Further details on Annuals from the Infill Galleries:-
Uses of Annuals

...Exposed Sites
...Sheltered Sites
...in Greenhouse
...Extra Poor Soil
...Very Rich Soil
...Gap Filling
...Patio Pots
...Cut Flowers 1, 2
...Everlasting Flos
...Attract Insects
...with Fragrance
...Bee Pollinated
...Annual Pairing
...Low-Growing
...Med-Growing
...Tall Growing
...Flower Colour:-
......Black/Brown
......Blue-Purple
......Green
......Red-Pink
......White
......Yellow/Orange
...for its Foliage
...in Moist Soil
...in Shade
...as Houseplants
...Edging Beds
...Hanging Basket
...Vining Annuals

 


Apr 19 Sissinghurst Folder from Sissinghurst Castle Garden taken on
19 April 2013 with Plant Supports
1
, 5,
Plants 2, 3, 4,

List of Pictures in a Picture Folder:-

Coleus bedding foliage trial in Plant Trials Field in Garden at Wisley on 2 October 2013, with link to mail-order supplier(s).

See
Final Report for Trial No. 1949 - Solenostemon 2013 - Source: Horticultural Trials and Relations, RHS Garden Wisley, Woking, Surrey GU23 6QB.

Solenostemon (From the Greek “solen” (tube) and “stemon” (stamen), in reference to the stamens being united into the corolla (petal) tube. Family members are easily recognized by their square stems), commonly known as Coleus is a genus of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae. They are native to tropical Africa, Asia and Australia. Some species are cultivated for their highly variegated leaves.
The synonyms Coleus blumei and Solenostemon scutellarioides are also widely used names for this species. They are bushy, woody-based evergreen perennials, usually used as annual bedding plants for their foliage.

In the UK, they are grown mostly for the vibrant colour of their leaves, sometimes 3 contrasting colours appear together, with no 2 leaves exactly alike. Colours include yellow, red, orange, lime green, dark green, and mahogany. The decorative appearance of the leaves is often enhanced by scalloped or ruffled margins. Popular for beds and borders, also containers, including hanging baskets.

 

Page 1

Solenostemon 1 IMG 9558 is
'Alligator Tears'; sender Elsner PAC
Solenostemon 1 IMG 9559
Solenostemon 1 IMG 9560

Solenostemon 2 IMG 9561 is
'Black Prince'; sender Elsner PAC
Solenostemon 2 IMG 9562
Solenostemon 2 IMG 9563

Solenostemon 3 IMG 9564 is
'Brilliant'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon 3 IMG 9565
Solenostemon 3 IMG 9566
Solenostemon 3 IMG 9567

Page 2

Solenostemon coleus 4 IMG 9568 is
'Caipirinha'; sender Elsner PAC
Solenostemon coleus 4 IMG 9569
Solenostemon coleus 4 IMG 9570

Solenostemon coleus 5 IMG 9571 is
'China Rose'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 5 IMG 9572
Solenostemon coleus 5 IMG 9573

Solenostemon coleus 6 I'MG 9574 is
'Combat AGM (h1c) 2012'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 6 IMG 9575
Solenostemon coleus 6 IMG 9576

Page 3

Solenostemon coleus 7 IMG 9577 is
'Combat AGM (h1c) 2012'; sender
Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 7 IMG 9578
Solenostemon coleus 7 IMG 9579

Solenostemon coleus 8 IMG 9580 is
'Combat AGM (h1c) 2012'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 8 IMG 9581
Solenostemon coleus 8 IMG 9582

Solenostemon coleus 9 IMG 9583 is
'Crimson Velvet'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 9 IMG 9584
Solenostemon coleus 9 IMG 9585

Page 4

Solenostemon coleus 10 IMG 9586 is
'Dipped in Wine'; sender Elsner PAC
Solenostemon coleus 10 IMG 9587
Solenostemon coleus 10 IMG 9588
Solenostemon coleus 10 IMG 9589

Solenostemon coleus 11 IMG 9590 is
'Firelight'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 11 IMG 9591
Solenostemon coleus 11 IMG 9592

Solenostemon coleus 12 IMG 9593 is
'Gay's Delight'; sender Ball Colegave
Solenostemon coleus 12 IMG 9594

Page 5

Solenostemon coleus 13 IMG 9595 is
'Green Chartreuse'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 13 IMG 9596
Solenostemon coleus 13 IMG 9597
Solenostemon coleus 13 IMG 9598

Solenostemon coleus 14 IMG 9599 is
Solenostemon scutellaroides Henna = 'Balcenna'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 14 IMG 9600
Solenostemon coleus 14 IMG 9601

Solenostemon coleus 15 IMG 9602 is
'Kentish Fire'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 15 IMG 9603
Solenostemon coleus 15 IMG 9604

Page 6

Solenostemon coleus 16 IMG 9605 is
'Kiwi Fern'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 16 IMG 9606
Solenostemon coleus 16 IMG 9607

Solenostemon coleus 17 IMG 9608 is
'Muriel Pedley'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 17 IMG 9609
Solenostemon coleus 17 IMG 9610

Solenostemon coleus 18 IMG 9611 is
'Peter Wonder'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 18 IMG 9612
Solenostemon coleus 18 IMG 9613
Solenostemon coleus 18 IMG 9614

Page 7

Solenostemon coleus 19 IMG 9615 is
'Peter's Wonder'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 19 IMG 9616
Solenostemon coleus 19 IMG 9617

Solenostemon coleus 20 IMG 9618 is
'Pink Chaos AGM (H1c) 2012'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 20 IMG 9619
Solenostemon coleus 20 IMG 9620

Solenostemon coleus 21 IMG 9621 is
'Red Angel'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 21 IMG 9622
Solenostemon coleus 21 IMG 9623

Page 8

Solenostemon coleus 22 IMG 9624 is
'Redhead = 'Ufo646'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 22 IMG 9625
Solenostemon coleus 22 IMG 9626
Solenostemon coleus 22 IMG 9630

Solenostemon coleus 23 IMG 9627 is
'Roy Pedly AGM (H1c) 2012';
sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 23 IMG 9628
Solenostemon coleus 23 IMG 9629

Solenostemon coleus 24 IMG 9631 is
'Saturn'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 24 IMG 9632
Solenostemon coleus 24 IMG 9633

Page 9

Solenostemon coleus 25 IMG 9634 is
'Saturn'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 25 IMG 9635
Solenostemon coleus 25 IMG 9636

Solenostemon coleus 26 IMG 9637 is
'Saturn'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 26 IMG 9638
Solenostemon coleus 26 IMG 9639

Solenostemon coleus 27 IMG 9640 is
'Sky Fire'; sender Elsner PAC
Solenostemon coleus 27 IMG 9641
Solenostemon coleus 27 IMG 9642
Solenostemon coleus 27 IMG 9643

Page 10

Solenostemon coleus 28 IMG 9644 is
'Spitfire'; sender Elsner PAC
Solenostemon coleus 28 IMG 9645
Solenostemon coleus 28 IMG 9646
Solenostemon coleus 28 IMG 9647

Solenostemon coleus 29 IMG 9648 is
'Trusty Rusty = 'Uf06419';
sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 29 IMG 9649
Solenostemon coleus 29 IMG 9650

Solenostemon coleus 30 IMG 9651 is
'Winsome'; sender Dibleys
Solenostemon coleus 30 IMG 9652
Solenostemon coleus 30 IMG 9653
Solenostemon coleus 30 IMG 9654

Page 11

Solenostemon coleus 31 IMG 9655 is
'Kong Green'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 31 IMG 9656
Solenostemon coleus 31 IMG 9657

Solenostemon coleus 32 IMG 9658 is
'Kong Mosaic'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 32 IMG 9659
Solenostemon coleus 32 IMG 9660

Solenostemon coleus 33 IMG 9661 is
'Kong Red'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 33 IMG 9662
Solenostemon coleus 33 IMG 9663

Page 12

Solenostemon coleus 34 IMG 9664 is
'Kong Rose'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 34 IMG 9665
Solenostemon coleus 34 IMG 9666

Solenostemon coleus 35 IMG 9667 is
'Kong Salmon Pink'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 35 IMG 9668
Solenostemon coleus 35 IMG 9669

Solenostemon coleus 36 IMG 9670 is
'Kong Scarlet'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 36 IMG 9671
Solenostemon coleus 36 IMG 9672

Page 13

Solenostemon coleus 37 IMG 9673 is
'Wizard Coral Sunrise'; sender
Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 37 IMG 9674
Solenostemon coleus 37 IMG 9675

Solenostemon coleus 38 IMG 9676 is
'Wizard Golden'; sender
Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 38 IMG 9677
Solenostemon coleus 38 IMG 9678

Solenostemon coleus 39 IMG 9679 is
'Wizard Jade'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 39 IMG 9680
Solenostemon coleus 39 IMG 9681

Page 14

Solenostemon coleus 40 IMG 9682 is
'Wizard Mosaic'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 40 IMG 9683
Solenostemon coleus 40 IMG 9684

Solenostemon coleus 41 IMG 9685 is
'Wizard Pastel'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 41 IMG 9686
Solenostemon coleus 41 IMG 9687

Solenostemon coleus 42 IMG 9688 is
'Wizard Pineapple'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 42 IMG 9689
Solenostemon coleus 42 IMG 9690

Page 15

Solenostemon coleus 43 IMG 9691 is
'Wizard Scarlet'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 43 IMG 9692
Solenostemon coleus 43 IMG 9693

Solenostemon coleus 44 IMG 9694 is
'Wizard Sunset'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 44 IMG 9695
Solenostemon coleus 44 IMG 9696

Solenostemon coleus 45 IMG 9697 is
'Wizard Velvet Red'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 45 IMG 9698
Solenostemon coleus 45 IMG 9699

Page 16

Solenostemon coleus 46 IMG 9700 is
'Fairway Mosaic'; sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 46 IMG 9701
Solenostemon coleus 46 IMG 9702

Solenostemon coleus 47 IMG 9703 is
'Fairway Orange'; sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 47 IMG 9704
Solenostemon coleus 47 IMG 9705

Solenostemon coleus 48 IMG 9706 is
'Fairway Red Velvet'; sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 48 IMG 9707
Solenostemon coleus 48 IMG 9708

Page 17

Solenostemon coleus 49 IMG 9709 is
'Fairway Rose'; sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 49 IMG 9710
Solenostemon coleus 49 IMG 9711

Solenostemon coleus 50 IMG 9712 is
'Fairway Ruby'; sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 50 IMG 9713
Solenostemon coleus 50 IMG 9714

Solenostemon coleus 51 IMG 9715
'Fairway Yellow'; sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 51 IMG 9716
Solenostemon coleus 51 IMG 9717

Page 18

Solenostemon coleus 52 IMG 9718
'Superfine Rainbow Colour Pride';
sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 52 IMG 9719
Solenostemon coleus 52 IMG 9720

Solenostemon coleus 53 IMG 9721
'Superfine Rainbow Festive Dance';
sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 53 IMG 9722
Solenostemon coleus 53 IMG 9723

Solenostemon coleus 54 IMG 9724 is
'Superfine Rainbow Red Velvet';
sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 54 IMG 9725
Solenostemon coleus 54 IMG 9726

Page 19

Solenostemon coleus 55 IMG 9727 is
'Superfine Rainbow Volcano';
sender Sakata
Solenostemon coleus 55 IMG 9728
Solenostemon coleus 55 IMG 9729

Solenostemon coleus 56 IMG 9730 is
'Giant Exhibition Limelight';
sender Takii
Solenostemon coleus 56 IMG 9731
Solenostemon coleus 56 IMG 9732

Solenostemon coleus 57 IMG 9733 is
'Giant Exhibition Magma';
sender Takii
Solenostemon coleus 57 IMG 9734
Solenostemon coleus 57 IMG 9735

Page 20

Solenostemon coleus 58 IMG 9736 is
'Giant Exhibition Marble';
sender Takii
Solenostemon coleus 58 IMG 9737
Solenostemon coleus 58 IMG 9738

Solenostemon coleus 59 IMG 9739 is
'Giant Exhibition Multicolour';
sender Takii
Solenostemon coleus 59 IMG 9740
Solenostemon coleus 59 IMG 9741

Solenostemon coleus 60 IMG 9742 is
'Giant Exhibition Palisandra';
sender Takii
Solenostemon coleus 60 IMG 9743
Solenostemon coleus 60 IMG 9744

Page 21

Solenostemon coleus 61 IMG 9745 is
'Giant Exhibition Rustic Red';
sender Takii
Solenostemon coleus 61 IMG 9746
Solenostemon coleus 61 IMG 9747
Solenostemon coleus 61 IMG 9748

Solenostemon coleus 62 IMG 9749 is
'Dark Chocolate';
sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 62 IMG 9750
Solenostemon coleus 62 IMG 9751

Solenostemon coleus 63 IMG 9752 is
'Chocolate Covered Cherry';
sender Ball Colegate
Solenostemon coleus 63 IMG 9753
Solenostemon coleus 63 IMG 9754

Page 22

Solenostemon coleus 64 IMG 9755 is
'Chocolate Mint', sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 64 IMG 9756
Solenostemon coleus 64 IMG 9757

Solenostemon coleus 65 IMG 9758 is
'Chocolate Splash'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 65 IMG 9759
Solenostemon coleus 65 IMG 9760
Solenostemon coleus 65 IMG 9761

Solenostemon coleus 66 IMG 9762 is
'Black Dragon'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 66 IMG 9763
Solenostemon coleus 66 IMG 9764

Page 23

Solenostemon coleus 67 IMG 9765 is
'Crimson Gold PBR';
sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 67 IMG 9766
Solenostemon coleus 67 IMG 9767
Solenostemon coleus 67 IMG 9768

Solenostemon coleus 68 IMG 9769 is
'Green Halo'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 68 IMG 9770
Solenostemon coleus 68 IMG 9771

Solenostemon coleus 69 IMG 9772 is
'Watermelon'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 69 IMG 9773
Solenostemon coleus 69 IMG 9774

Page 24

Solenostemon coleus 70 IMG 9775 is
'Lime Delight'; sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 70 IMG 9776
Solenostemon coleus 70 IMG 9777

Solenostemon coleus 71 IMG 9778 is
'Lime Delight'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 71 IMG 9779
Solenostemon coleus 71 IMG 9780

Solenostemon coleus 72 IMG 9781 is
'Colissima Amerena'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 72 IMG 9782
Solenostemon coleus 72 IMG 9783

Page 25

Solenostemon coleus 73 IMG 9784 is
'Colissima Capri', sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 73 IMG 9785
Solenostemon coleus 73 IMG 9786

Solenostemon coleus 74 IMG 9787 is
'Collissima Papaya'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 74 IMG 9788
Solenostemon coleus 74 IMG 9789

Solenostemon coleus 75 IMG 9790
'Collissima Peach Melba'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 75 IMG 9791
Solenostemon coleus 75 IMG 9792

Page 26

Solenostemon coleus 76 IMG 9793 is
'Collissima Raspberry'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 76 IMG 9794
Solenostemon coleus 76 IMG 9795

Solenostemon coleus 77 IMG 9796 is
'Colissima Strawberry'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 77 IMG 9797
Solenostemon coleus 77 IMG 9798

Solenostemon coleus 78 IMG 9799 is
'Alabama Sunset'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 78 IMG 9800
Solenostemon coleus 78 IMG 9801

Page 27

Solenostemon coleus 79 IMG 9802 is
'Crimson Velvet'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 79 IMG 9803
Solenostemon coleus 79 IMG 9804

Solenostemon coleus 80 IMG 9805 is
'Display'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 80 IMG 9806
Solenostemon coleus 80 IMG 9807

Solenostemon coleus 81 IMG 9808 is
'Fireball'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 81 IMG 9809
Solenostemon coleus 81 IMG 9810

Page 28

Solenostemon coleus 82 IMG 9811 is
'Glennis'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 82 IMG 9812
Solenostemon coleus 82 IMG 9813

Solenostemon coleus 83 IMG 9814 is
'Glory'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 83 IMG 9815
Solenostemon coleus 83 IMG 9816

Solenostemon coleus 84 IMG 9817 is
'Midnight'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 84 IMG 9818
Solenostemon coleus 84 IMG 9819

Page 29

Solenostemon coleus 85 IMG 9820 is
'Mission Gem'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 85 IMG 9821
Solenostemon coleus 85 IMG 9822

Solenostemon coleus 86 IMG 9823 is
'Pineapple Beauty AGM (H1c) 1994';
sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 86 IMG 9824
Solenostemon coleus 86 IMG 9825

Solenostemon coleus 87 IMG 9826 is
'Pineapplette AGM (H1c) 1994';
sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 87 IMG 9827
Solenostemon coleus 87 IMG 9828

Page 30

Solenostemon coleus 88 IMG 9829 is
'Pineapplette Red'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 88 IMG 9830
Solenostemon coleus 88 IMG 9831

Solenostemon coleus 89 IMG 9832 is
'Purple Oak'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 89 IMG 9833
Solenostemon coleus 89 IMG 9834

Solenostemon coleus 90 IMG 9835 is
'Red Velvet'; sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 90 IMG 9836
Solenostemon coleus 90 IMG 9837

Page 31

Solenostemon coleus 91 IMG 9838 is
'Walter Turner AGM (H1c) 1994';
sender Jaldety
Solenostemon coleus 91 IMG 9839
Solenostemon coleus 91 IMG 9840

Landscape photos of
Solenostemon coleus bed IMG 9850
Solenostemon coleus bed IMG 9851

Page 32

Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9841 is
'Carefree Mixed';
sender Ball Colegrave
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9842
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9843
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9844
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9845
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9846
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9847
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9848
Solenostemon coleus 92 IMG 9849

Coleus Bedding Trial Index
Annuals with Blue to Purple Flowers
Annuals with Red to Pink Flowers
Annuals with Green Flowers
Annuals with Black or Brown Flowers
Annuals with Yellow, and Orange Flowers
Annuals with White Flowers
Low-Growing Annuals
Medium-Growing Annuals
Tall-Growing Annuals
Heat-Tolerant Annuals
Annuals for Moist Soil
Annuals for Shade
Annuals for Indoors
Annuals for Cutting
Annuals that Naturalize
Annuals with Decorative Foliage
Annuals for Edging
Annuals for Fragrance
Annuals for Hanging Baskets
Vining Annuals
Annuals for Coastal Gardens
Annuals with Clump-Forming Habit
Annuals with Compact/Bushy Habit
Annuals with Erect Habit
Annuals with Mounded Habit
Annuals with Spreading or Sprawling Habit
Annuals with Wildflower Meadows
Annuals To Cover Fences
Annuals of Odds and Sods 1, 2

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1


(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2


(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3


(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4


Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot91a1a1a1a

Closed Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot92a1a1a1a

Opening Bud

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot93a1a1a1a

Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot94a1a1a1a

Older Juvenile Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot95a1a1a1a

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot96a1a1a1a

Mature Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot97a1a1a1a

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

rosalincolnshirepoacherflot98a1a1a1a

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

 

 

 

 

I have copied the archived post below, because what is stated there is extremely important, since 99.99% of gardeners in the UK totally ignore the fact that plants require humus and think that double-digging is beneficial every year. That is why they are killing their soil and their plants do not grow well.

How Soil Works in the Category Archives: Flowering House Plants of Houseplantsguru. com:-

"Nature’s plan is to build up the humus year after year and this can only be done by organic matter. There is need to replace and return that which has been taken out. The Chinese, who are the best gardeners, collect, ‘use’, and return to the soil, every possible kind of waste, vegetable, animal and human. In over 4000 years of intensive cultivation they still support more human beings per hectare than any other country in the world! On the other hand in areas like the Middle West of the U.S.A. And the Regina Plain of Canada, where the Wheel of Life has not been recognized, tens of thousands of hectares which once grew heavy crops are now useless, or practically so.

Every flower crop grown reduces the organic content of the ground. Every piece of work done helps to break down the humus. The value of the soil in your garden, therefore, is not the mica particles or grains of sand. It lies in the humus that the soil contains. Humus makes all the difference to successful gardening. Have plenty of humus present and the soil is in good tilth. Humus is the organic colloid of the soil. It can store water, it can store plant foods, it can help to keep the soil open. It can help to ensure the right aeration. It will give ideal insulation against heat and cold.

Using Compost

Garden owners proposing to dig their land shallowly in preparation for flower growing, should realize the importance of adding ample quantities of organic matter before they start. Composted farmyard manure, fine wool shoddy, properly composted vegetable refuse, or hop manure should be added at the rate of one good barrow-load to 10 m2 (12 sq yds) and in addition into the top 25 or 50 mm (1 or 2 in) of soil finely divided sedge peat, non-acid in character should be raked in at about half a bucketful (9 litres) per square metre (2 gallons per sq yd). This organic matter in the top few millimetres of soil gives the little roots a good start and so sends them on to find the organic matter below.

It is when the organic content of the soil has been helped in this way, that the gardener dares to add plant foods of an organic origin. These are usually applied on the surface of the ground and raked in. Fertilizers with an organic base are particularly useful. Fish Manure may be applied at 105 to 140 g/m2 (3 oz to 4 oz per sq yd), or a meat and bone meal or even hoof and horn meal mixed with equal quantities of wood ashes may be used at a similar rate. These plant foods can be supplied not only when the flower garden is first made but every season very early in the spring. A good dried poultry manure to which a little potash has been added is another fertilizer that is very useful when applied at this time.

Minimum Digging

Flower growers must realize that proper soil treatment is the first essential to success. The millions and millions of soil bacteria that live in the ground to help the gardener, much appreciate little or no digging. It enables them to work better, for they need conditions which are natural. So do give them what they need.

Liming

Lime should be regarded as an essential except in very definite cases where acidity is demanded, e.g. the heaths and heathers, rhododendrons and azaleas.

Lime not only prevents soil from being acid but it ‘sweetens’ it, as well as playing its part as a plant food. It improves the texture and workability of heavy soils. It helps to release other plant foods, and it decomposes organic compounds in the soil so that they can be used as plant food also.

Generally speaking it should be applied at about 245 g/m2 (7 oz per sq yd). It should not be dug in, as it washes down into the soil very quickly. It should be sprinkled on the surface of the ground after the digging and manuring has been done. Do not mix lime with organic fertilizers. There are three main types of lime: Quicklime, sometimes sold as Buxton Lime or Lump Lime, which has to be slaked down on the soil; Chalk or Limestone, often sold as Ground Limestone, only half as valuable as quicklime; and Hydrated Lime, which is perhaps the most convenient to handle and is therefore most usually used by gardeners. The quantity of lime mentioned previously i.e. 245 g/m2 (7 oz per sq yd), refers to hydrated lime."

 

The following is the opinion of Chris Garnons-Williams to the above:-

If you walk through an old wooded area, which is not intensively managed, you will see dead leaves on the ground, together with fallen branches, brambles, nettles, other weeds and juvenile plants. There will be waste material from birds and animals and this has not been cleared up and disposed of. This mulch then provides the organic material to be recycled via the ground with its different organisms to the roots of those same trees for them to continue to grow. Nobody digs up the ground to push this material in a few inches or to the depth of the topsoil, nature does it with earthworms and other organisms at the rate required by the organisms down below to then use it. The trees in this wood then grow fairly uniformly using the available resources.

So, do not dig the manure, wool shoddy, vegetable refuse or hop manure or anything else in. Leave it on top as a mulch and that includes the organic fertilizers and the lime.
Instead of adding finely divided sedge peat, add spent mushroom compost which contains peat which has already been used; and so you are using their waste product for recycling, instead of destroying more peat bogs which have taken 1000's of years to be created. You could use bracken instead of peat.

The topsoil is full of organisms, either the waste products from are used by another or they are. If you turn them up from the bottom of the topsoil to the top, then those new top ones will starve to death and the ones who were at the top are now at the bottom and they will as well since it is only waste down there which is not their normal fare. They do have a bus transport system to get them back to their original levels, since water is the only transport system down there, which unfortunately normally goes downwards.

So why do you not use the companion planting cultivation method as further detailed in Companion Planting? You may follow this with the following which is normally used for the vegetable garden:-

"Spinach is sown in spring in rows 50cm apart over the whole vegetable garden area for the following purposes:

  • these rows divide the vegetable garden up for the whole year,
  • the spinach roots prevent erosion, so the usual paths between beds are omitted,
  • young spinach plants provide protection and shade for the vegetable crops to be grown between them,
  • spinach provides ideal material for sheet surface composting, which becomes an intermediate space, a footpath, and
  • it is in between these lines of spinach that the other vegetable varieties are arranged."

This could be used in the flower beds as the system between the permanent plants of trees, shrubs and perennials, which is where you may put bedding. This will also provide you with access to the bedding and the permanent plants together with the nitrogen fertilizer for the other plants from the legumes of spinach.
You plant your bedding through the mulch.

item33a1a1a item33a1a1a item30b2a1 item30b2a1 item31d1a1a item31d1a1a item36a2a1a1 item36a2a1a1 item1b2a1a1 item1b2a1a1 item38a1a1a1 item38a1a1a1 item34a1a1a1 item34a1a1a1 item40a1a1a item40a1a1a item1e1a1 item1e1a1 item45a1a1a item45a1a1a item46a1a1a1 item46a1a1a1 item47a1a1a1 item47a1a1a1 item1c2a1a item1c2a1a item1d2a1a item1d2a1a item48e1a1a item48e1a1a item32a1a1a1 item32a1a1a1 item52c1a1a item52c1a1a