Ivydene Gardens Plant Botanical Index Gallery:
Index: M

Plant Botanical Name:
MA, MB, MC, MD

 

Plant Botanical Name:
ME, MF, MG, MH

 

Plant Botanical Name:
MI, MJ, MK, Ml

MA

ME

MI

 

 

 

Macleaya x kewensis - Hp-Erect
Pink Sha Bac Spe Grown for its
foliage
microcarpa 'Kelway's Coral
Plume
' - Hp-Clump Pink Bac Spe
Pot Cut
microcarpa 'Spetchley Ruby'
- Hp-Clump Red Bac Sha Hip
Grow with ornamental grasses.
Grown for its foliage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mahonia japonica - Es-Erect
Yellow Sha-Part or Full Shade
Fra Fru Pot Hed-Sharply
toothed leaves deterrs people
when used as a hedge.

Melasphaerula ramosa - Bu
Yellow PotGr Fless Cut Roc Fra
Sha

 

 

 

 

Malus domesitica - To
Details of 'Bramley's Seedling', 'James Grieve', 'Howgate Wonder', 'Merton Worcester', 'Gala', 'Dartmouth', 'Golden Hornet' and 'John Downie' apples are shown below from the
Top Fruit...Apple Gallery

 

Mimulus primuloides - Bu Yellow
Sha Roc Gro Wat
Mitella breweri - Bu Other Sha
Woo-Gro Gra Pot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massonia echinata - Bu
Other PotGr Fless

 

Miscanthus uses -
Bed-Mass Cott Wat Hed
Spe for winter landscape.
Combine with spring flowering bulbs, Aster, Rudbeckia, Sedum or Yucca alongside.
Miscanthus sinensis 'Gracillimus' -
Gr-Arching Clump White Sha
sinensis 'Grosse Fontane' -
Gr-Clump White
sinensis 'Kaskade' -
Gr-Clump White
sinensis 'Morning Light' -
Gr-Clump White
sinensis 'Roland' -
Gr-Clump White
sinensis 'Zebrinus' -
Gr-Clump White

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MB

MF

MJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MC

MG

MK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MD

MH

ML

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malus domestica (Apple)
From Chris Murphy writing in the Sunday East Kent Digital Edition of 24/10/2010:-
The Campaign for the Protection of Rural England reports that in the last decade the UK has lost 31% of its apple orchard land; in the last 25 years more than 1/2 our apple orchards have disappeared. Between 1946 and 2003, 92% of orchard land disappeared in Kent county, and from 1999 to 2003, the net loss per year was 1.8%. Every year Britons consume 680,000 tonnes of apples, but just 1 in 3 apples are British, despite the fact the climate in the UK can support 2,300 varieties. Common Ground said "Since the 60's, Kent lost 80% of its orchard land. The reason so many have been lost is because the economics haven't been working because so many superstores have been buying the cheapest, and importing them from Chile, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand at the height of our UK season from July to March. Many varieties are suitable for short-term storage, making UK produced apples available for much of the year."Sally Roger, of the Brogdale Collections in Faversham, said: "Thousands of acres of orchards and many heritage varieties of apples, pears, plums and cherries have disappeared from Kent over the last few decades as shoppers have demanded more perfect looking fruit all year round from supermarkets."

 

To ensure that the apple blossom is pollinated by the bees, then another apple tree from the same or adjacent flowering group ( Group 1 with Group 1 or 2, Group 2 with Group 1 or Group 3, etc ) should be present within a short distance. Further details in Introduction Page.

The list of Apple Trees is in alphabetical order with the
Acid/Sweet Taste - Flowering Group - Month of Picking in UK - Apple Type - Apple Name

.

Acid/Sweet Taste

Flowering Group

Apple

Month of Picking in UK

Apple Type

Apple Name INDEX link to Apple Description Page

Acid

3

malusbramleyfrusinglefoord1a

October

Cooking

Bramley's Seedling

Acid

3

malusjamesgrievefrutfoord

September

Dessert: Cooking

James Grieve

Sweet

3

 

October

Dessert: Cooking

Howgate Wonder

Sweet

3

malusmertonworcesterfrutfoord

September

Dessert

Merton Worcester

Sweet

4

malusgalafrutlovelidge

October

Dessert

Gala

Tart

1

malusdartmouthfrutfoord

September

Crab

Dartmouth

Tart

2

malusgoldenhornetfrutfoord

September

Crab

Golden Hornet

Tart

2

malusjohndowniefrutfoord

October

Crab

John Downie

 

"Grow Your Own Fruit" by Ken Muir,
(www.kenmuir.co.uk) Honeypot Farm, Weeley Heath, Clacton-On-Sea, Essex. CO16 9BJ Tel: 01255 830181 provides the information on cultural practices in a clear and concise manner. It is strongly recommended that this booklet is read before growing Top Fruit or Soft Fruit, so that correct plants for your soil can be purchased and give a good yield.

There are further details concerning Soil, Sun Aspect and Soil Moisture levels in the Top Fruit Page of the Plants Section, together with the apple rootstock details of M.9, M.25, M.26, M.27 and MM.106 that determine the potential natural height of the apple tree.

The Apple Gallery has thumbnail pictures of apple shapes available in container grown form for the following uses:-

  • 2 feet (60 cm) high StepOver from M.27 rootstock. Plant alongside paths and beds
  • 6 feet (180 cm) high Patio Fruit Tree from M.27 rootstock. Use in pots on patios for any size garden.
  • 6 feet high Bush from M.27 rootstock. Plant as fruit bushes in the garden instead of 6 feet high ornamental shrubs.
  • 6 feet high Cordon from M.9 rootstock. Train in any size garden onto 6 feet high support structure on fences or walls.
  • 6 feet high Espalier from MM.106. Train in any size garden onto 6 feet high support structure on fences or walls.
  • 6 feet high Fan from MM.106 rootstock. Train in any size garden onto 6 feet high support structure on fences or walls.
  • 15 feet (450 cm)high Bush from M.26 rootstock. Plant as 15 feet wide tree or lawn bush in large gardens.
  • 18 feet (540 cm) high Bush from MM.106 rootstock. Plant as 18 feet wide tree or lawn bush in large gardens.
  • 18 feet high Half Standard from MM.106 rootstock. Plant as classic lawn tree for large gardens.

This plant gallery has thumbnail pictures of apple shapes available in bare root form for the following uses:-

  • Maiden M.27 for training or hedging
  • Maiden M.9 for training or hedging
  • Maiden M.26 for training or hedging
  • Maiden MM.106 for training or hedging
  • Maiden M.25 for training or hedging
  • 6 feet high Bush from M.27 rootstock for use as a shrub
  • 6 feet high Cordon from M.9 rootstock. Train in any size garden onto 6 feet high support structure on fences or walls.
  • 10 feet (300 cm) high Bush from M.9 rootstock. Plant as fruit bushes in the garden instead of 10 feet high ornamental shrubs.
  • 15 feet high Bush from M.26 rootstock. Plant as 15 feet wide tree or lawn bush in large gardens.
  • 18 feet high Half Standard from MM.106 rootstock. Plant as medium-sized trees for large gardens/orchards.
  • 18 feet high Bush from MM.106 rootstock. Plant as 18 feet wide tree in large gardens.
  • 30 feet (900 cm) high Straight Lead from M.25 rootstock. Plant as Standard tree for large gardens.

Cultivation details and other Apple, Pear and Cherry Trees in Top Fruit Plant List.

"Minarettes® are slender, columnar fruit trees which bear their fruits on short spurs along the length of a vertical stem rather than on long spreading branches. They are perfect for today's smaller gardens because they can be planted as close as 60-90cm (2-3ft) apart as well as being ideal for growing in tubs on patios or balconies. When mature, Minarette® trees are 1.8-2.4m (6-8ft) tall and crop prolifically.   A large range of apples, pears, plums, gages, damsons and cherries are available as Minarettes®" from Ken Muir.
THERE IS THEREFORE A TOP FRUIT TREE SUITABLE FOR ANYWHERE IN ANY SIZE GARDEN OR IN THE HOUSE INSTEAD OF PLANTING OTHER DECIDUOUS TREE.

Massonia
"Natives of the Cape of Good Hope. Should be potted from September to November in a compost consisting of equal parts sand, peat, and leaf-mould, and be plunged in a cold frame until growth has commenced, when they may be transferred to the cool greenhouse. Water should be given in moderation during the growing season and cease altogether when the plants are at rest.
Propagate by offsets removed at the time of potting and treated as ordinary bulbs." from The culture of bulbs, bulbous plants and tubers made plain by Sir J.L. Cotter. Published by Hutchinson & Co.

"Massonia genus is almost always found growing in poor soil, in areas with hot and dry summers in South Africa.
Massonia echinata with leaves prostrate; flowers yellow or white fading to pink and flowering in May-Jul in the Eastern Cape Province.
Must have sandy, well-drained, soil, and plants will not withstand any frost. The bulbs should be set some 2-3 inches (5-7.5 cms) deep in the soil, in a sunny location, and should not be exposed to temperatures below 45F (7C). After flowering and the foliage starts to die, they must be given a dry and warm resting period. The leaves will exist for quite a long time and thus it might be necessary to withdraw moisture in order to induce dormancy. The plants having large leaves should be spaced at least 10 inches (25 cms) apart." from Bulbs Volume II, I-Z with Appendixes and Indexes by John E. Bryan. Published by Christopher Helm (Publishers) Ltd in 1989. ISBN 0-88192-101-7.

Miniature Garden
Not much room, then create a miniature garden:-

"The Miniature Garden Shoppe is a family business which opened in 2008. I (Kathryn) am the creative mind, designer, and gardener behind the store and my husband, Ben, is the computer-guy and entrepreneur. My mother-in-law, Mary, is our talented photographer.
The concept of miniature gardening makes so much sense. Many of us don’t have the time to tend huge gardens these days. And those who already have gardens, appreciate the opportunity for a new creative gardening outlet that doesn’t require digging up more ground or hours of maintenance.
I grew up in the greenhouse business and am a garden designer and horticulturalist by trade, with a degree in Ornamental Horticulture from the University of Illinois. I was first charmed and inspired by a miniature garden that I saw on an area garden club garden walk in 2005. Like any creative soul, I started thinking of how I would make my own little landscape. I started searching for all of the miniature garden necessities and began gardening in a new direction, on a much smaller scale. The ideas are limitless but the materials can be difficult to find, hence the Miniature Garden Shoppe….
It goes without saying that all of the products on our website are not toys and not intended for children. There are many sharp edges, pointed ends, and tiny pieces that are nothing but hazardous for young kids. Having said that, I can tell you that people of all ages are charmed by these little creations. My two-year old son loved to dig in the gardens with the tiny shovel and to water our miniature garden using the tiny bucket, which he fills from the birdbath in the yard.
Whatever your age or interest, I hope you find everything you need to create a tiny garden treasure of your own or for a special gift. Nothing can squash a flash of inspiration like the frustration of not being able to find what you need. If there’s something you’re looking for and can’t find it, please drop us a line. If you run into a problem when you’re creating your garden or a have a question while caring for it, please don’t hesitate to contact us. If we don’t have the answer, we’ll help you find it.

These little gardens are enchanting and intriguing and I’m glad your search has led you here. I know you’re going to have fun with this idea and I hope we can help!
Happy gardening,   
Kathryn Newman   

Miniature Garden Shoppe   "

Rock Garden (Alpines) suitable for Small Gardens. Alpine Garden Society has an Encyclopaedia on Alpines.
 

Ivydene Gardens Rock Garden Plants Suitable for Small Gardens in Colour Wheel Gallery:
Rock Garden Plant Index: M with table detailing the abbreviations, which have been used in compiling the following list of Rock Plants for small gardens in order to make it possible to provide all the required information at a glance in a condensed form.

Botanical Plant Name

Suit-ability

Type

Height and Spread in Inches.

1 inch is appro-xima-tely 2.5cm

Soil

Position and Pro-tection

Flower Colour / Nearest Colour Wheel - Flowers Colour

Months of Flowering

Propa-gation

MELANDRIUM

 

elisabethae

B

HE

6 x 6

A

Sun

Magenta and rose

 

July

S

hookeri

B

HP

3 x 6

A

Sun

Salmon-pink

 

July

S

ingramii

B

HP

3 x 6

A

Sun

Rose-pink

 

July

S

MERTENSIA

 

echioides

A

HP

8 x 6

A

PS

Deep blue

 

June

DS

maritima

A

HP

2 x 4

A

Sun

Pale blue

 

July

S

primuloides

A

HP

3 x 6

A

PS

Violet

 

July

D

MICROMERIA

 

graeca

B

SE

4 x 6

A

Sun

Pink

 

July

C

piperella

B

SE

6 x 6

A

Sun

Bright Pink

 

July

C

MINUARTIA

 

aretioides

B

HE

2 x 5

A

Sun

White

 

April

GC

imbricata

B

HE

2 x 4

A

Sun

White

 

April

GC

leucocephala

B

HE

2 x 6

A

Sun

White

 

April

GC

rupestris

B

HE

2 x 6

A

Sun

Pink

 

April

GC

saxifraga

B

HE

2 x 6

A

Sun

White

 

May

GC

verna

B

HE

1 x 4

A

Sun

White

 

April

GC

MITCHELLA

 

repens

C

SE

2 x 12

CN

S

White, flushed red
Scarlet

 

June

October

GC

repens leucocarpa

C

SE

2 x 12

CN

S

White, flushed red
White

 

June

October

GC

undulata

C

SE

2 x 8

CN

S

Pink
Red

 

June
October

GC

MORISIA

 

monantha

B

HE

1 x 4

D or A

S

Yellow

 

May

Root C

MUSCARI

The bulbs will do well planted in small troughs or pans as houseplants; many are fragrant

azureum

B

B

3 x 2

B

Sun

Blue

 

March

DS

botryoides

B

B

4 x 6

B

Sun

Dark blue

 

March

DS

botryoides album

B

B

4 x 6

B

Sun

White

 

March

D

latifolium

B

B

6 x 3

B

Sun

Dark to light blue

 

April

DS

macrocarpum

B

B

6 x 3

B

Sun

Brownish-purple

 

April

DS

macrocarpum flavum

B

B

6 x 3

B

Sun

Purple to yellow

 

April

DS

macrocarpum major

B

B

6 x 3

B

Sun

Purple to pale yellow

 

April

DS

neglectum

B

B

4 X 2

B

Sun

Purplish-black

 

April

DS

MYOSOTIS

 

explanata

B

HE

2 x 6

A

PS

White

 

July

DS

rupicola

B

HP

3 x 4

A

Sun

Blue

 

May

S

uniflora

B

HE

2 x 4

A

Sun

Yellow

 

June

S

MYRTUS

 

nummularia

C

SE

3 x 8

CN

Sun P

White
Pink

 

June
September

GC

Ivydene Horticultural Services logo with I design, construct and maintain private gardens. I also advise and teach you in your own garden. 01634 389677

......

See growing guides from Hayloft. Hayloft specify the hardiness, best aspect, soil type, and soil pH with planting and care tips.

Alistair and Myra describe how their plants performed in their garden - over 40 years - in Scotland in Aberdeen Gardening.

Oak Leaf Gardening started in 2009 has detailed sections on Plants, How To, Problems and Blog.

All plant images (click and drag. If Archive Entry on page, click it to get his text information about that plant) created by John Jearrard are made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

The Hardy Plant Society has an image library, where the images are freely available for use, under certain conditions.

Plants for Small Gardens Nursery sell Dwarf Hardy, Rockery and Alpine Plants for today's miniature size gardens in the UK of 2021.

Plants to Plant sell plants in 3 inch (9cm) pots mail-order to the UK, from a wholesale company. Each website description includes photos with names of perfect companions.

There are over 650 National Plant Collections in the UK, Ireland and Channel Islands. Search the National Plant Collections.

See photos of 152 plants by S. R. Hinsley.

Green Retreats have designed and installed over 13,000 garden rooms for different uses.
......

Gardening Australia Guide - Everything You Need To Know About Gardening

Naturalize -
The practice of growing certain plants under as natural conditions as possible.
For example; daffodils are said to be naturalized when they are planted in grass and left to look after themselves.
The term is also used to describe plants from foreign countries which have established themselves so well in the country into which they have been introduced that they behave like native plants; and are able to maintain themselves without the aid of the gardener.

Companion Planting
...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants
to provide a Companion Plant to aid your selected plant or deter its pests

.....

In The Garden of Paghat the Ratgirl, data comes from her practical experience in USDA Zone 8. Use Garden Indexes.

Mr PGC travels the USA, Canada and Europe gathering information/ photos. Click on Alphabet letter of Plant Genus Index Pages.

White Flower Farm has Display Gardens open from Apr-Oct in USA and Garden Help.

Missouri Botanical Garden maps - of 79 acres - the plants. Use Plantfinder to see plant details of over 7,500 plants, with garden locations.

Plant Combination Ideas by Gardenia for winning design ideas.

Denver Botanic Gardens has gardens and collections on 24 acres. The plants are detailed in The Gardens Navigator website and show where you can see it in the 24 acres.

North Creek Nurseries sell Landscape Plugs of plants native to midatlantic states of USA.

Fall is for planting Wildflower seeds in USA.

American Horticultural Therapy Association advancing the practice of Horticultural Therapy
......

Country Farm Perennials Travel Pty Ltd conduct Australian and Overseas Gourmet Garden Holidays

Climber -
Grow Ramblers (Ra) or
Scramblers (Sc) on supports on House-Walls and elsewhere.
Grow Self-Clingers - like
Aerial Roots (Ar),
Sucker Pads (Sp),
Twining (Tw),
Twining Leaf-Stem (Twl) or
Twining Tendrils (TwT) - on garden walls, chainlink fences, trellis, pergolas or fedges, but not for House-Walls.

Clematis Cultivation Groups -
1 = Group 1,
2 = Group 2
3 = Group 3
4 = Herbaceous Climber

Initial Site design and content copyright ©Between August and October 2021.
Chris Garnons-Williams.

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

......

Great Plant Picks has plant lists for gardeners for the maritime Northwest of Washington, Oregon and British Columbia.

Did you know there are over 26,000 photos of pacific northwest native plants in our graphics library that you may use at no charge?

A Nature Observer's Journey in Singapore has a Plant Pictorial Database on his Plant Observatory Page with his conditions on use of Photos for non-commercial use.

The Useful Tropical Plants Database contains information on the edible, medicinal and many other uses of 1,000's of plants that can be grown in tropical regions.

South African Flora detailed by SANBI.

Real small-scale plants in a Garden Railway.
Trains4U is a Model Railway Specialist Firm with Scenic Materials including Trees, Bushes and Plants.
The Model Tree Shop for Model Railways, War Gaming and Landscaping Materials.

For a UK garden to truly thrive, it needs Bees, birds, butterflies and garden mammals.

Instaplant creates carpet bedding and 3D displays. Annual change of UK garden to Windmill or Dragon or mobile it to another garden

Topic - Over 1060 links in this table to a topic in a topic folder or page within that folder of this website
Case Studies
...Drive Foundations
Ryegrass and turf kills plants within Roadstone and in Topsoil due to it starving and dehydrating them.
CEDAdrive creates stable drive surface and drains rain into your ground, rather than onto the public road.
8 problems caused by building house on clay or with house-wall attached to clay.
Pre-building work on polluted soil.

Companion Planting
A ,B ,C ,D ,E ,
F ,G ,H ,I ,J ,K ,
L ,M ,N ,O ,P ,Q ,
R ,S ,T ,U ,V ,W ,
X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants
to provide a Companion Plant to aid your selected plant or deter its pests

Garden
Construction

with ground drains
Garden Design
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed
Borders

......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden
Maintenance

Glossary with a tomato teaching cauliflowers
Home
Library of over 1000 books
Offbeat Glossary with DuLally Bird in its flower clock.

Plants
...in Chalk
(Alkaline) Soil
......A-F1, A-F2,
......A-F3, G-L, M-R,
......M-R Roses, S-Z
...in Heavy
Clay Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Lime-Free
(Acid) Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z
...in Light
Sand Soil
......A-F, G-L, M-R,
......S-Z.
...Poisonous Plants.
...Extra Plant Pages
with its 6 Plant Selection Levels

Soil
...
Interaction between 2 Quartz Sand Grains to make soil
...
How roots of plants are in control in the soil
...
Without replacing Soil Nutrients, the soil will break up to only clay, sand or silt
...
Subsidence caused by water in Clay
...
Use water ring for trees/shrubs for first 2 years.

Tool Shed with 3 kneeling pads
Useful Data with benefits of Seaweed

Topic -
Plant Photo Galleries
with Plant Botanical Index

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z

If the plant type below has flowers, then the first gallery will include the flower thumbnail in each month of 1 of 6 or 7 flower colour comparison pages of each plant in its subsidiary galleries, as a low-level Plant Selection Process
Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape


Bulb Index
A1, 2, 3, B, C1, 2,
D, E, F, G, Glad,
H, I, J, K, L1, 2,
M, N, O, P, Q, R,
S, T, U, V, W, XYZ
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus with its 40 Flower Colours
......European A-E
......European F-M
......European N-Z
......Eur Non-classified
......American A
......American B
......American C
......American D
......American E
......American F
......American G
......American H
......American I
......American J
......American K
......American L
......American M
......American N
......American O
......American P
......American Q
......American R
......American S
......American T
......American U
......American V
......American W
......American XYZ
......Ame Non-classified
......Australia - empty
......India
......Lithuania
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
...Each of the above ...Bulb Galleries has its own set of Flower Colour Pages
...Flower Shape
...Bulb Form

...Bulb Use

...Bulb in Soil


Further details on bulbs from the Infill Galleries:-
Hardy Bulbs
...Aconitum
...Allium
...Alstroemeria
...Anemone

...Amaryllis
...Anthericum
...Antholyzas
...Apios
...Arisaema
...Arum
...Asphodeline

...Asphodelus
...Belamcanda
...Bloomeria
...Brodiaea
...Bulbocodium

...Calochorti
...Cyclobothrias
...Camassia
...Colchicum
...Convallaria 
...Forcing Lily of the Valley
...Corydalis
...Crinum
...Crosmia
...Montbretia
...Crocus

...Cyclamen
...Dicentra
...Dierama
...Eranthis
...Eremurus
...Erythrnium
...Eucomis

...Fritillaria
...Funkia
...Galanthus
...Galtonia
...Gladiolus
...Hemerocallis

...Hyacinth
...Hyacinths in Pots
...Scilla
...Puschkinia
...Chionodoxa
...Chionoscilla
...Muscari

...Iris
...Kniphofia
...Lapeyrousia
...Leucojum

...Lilium
...Lilium in Pots
...Malvastrum
...Merendera
...Milla
...Narcissus
...Narcissi in Pots

...Ornithogalum
...Oxalis
...Paeonia
...Ranunculus
...Romulea
...Sanguinaria
...Sternbergia
...Schizostylis
...Tecophilaea
...Trillium

...Tulip
...Zephyranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs
...Acidanthera
...Albuca
...Alstroemeri
...Andro-stephium
...Bassers
...Boussing-aultias
...Bravoas
...Cypellas
...Dahlias
...Galaxis,
...Geissorhizas
...Hesperanthas

...Gladioli
...Ixias
...Sparaxises
...Babianas
...Morphixias
...Tritonias

...Ixiolirions
...Moraeas
...Ornithogalums
...Oxalises
...Phaedra-nassas
...Pancratiums
...Tigridias
...Zephyranthes
...Cooperias

Uses of Bulbs:-
...for Bedding
...in Windowboxes
...in Border
...naturalized in Grass
...in Bulb Frame
...in Woodland Garden
...in Rock Garden
...in Bowls
...in Alpine House
...Bulbs in Greenhouse or Stove:-
...Achimenes
...Alocasias
...Amorpho-phalluses
...Arisaemas
...Arums
...Begonias
...Bomareas
...Caladiums

...Clivias
...Colocasias
...Crinums
...Cyclamens
...Cyrtanthuses
...Eucharises
...Urceocharis
...Eurycles

...Freesias
...Gloxinias
...Haemanthus
...Hippeastrums

...Lachenalias
...Nerines
...Lycorises
...Pencratiums
...Hymenocallises
...Richardias
...Sprekelias
...Tuberoses
...Vallotas
...Watsonias
...Zephyranthes

...Plant Bedding in
......Spring

......Summer
...Bulb houseplants flowering inside House during:-
......January
......February
......March
......April
......May
......June
......July
......August
......September
......October
......November
......December
...Bulbs and other types of plant flowering during:-
......Dec-Jan
......Feb-Mar
......Apr-May
......Jun-Aug
......Sep-Oct
......Nov-Dec
...Selection of the smaller and choicer plants for the Smallest of Gardens with plant flowering during the same 6 periods as in the previous selection


Climber in
3 Sector Vertical Plant System
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...A,B,C,D,E,F,G,
...H,I,J,K,L,M,N,
...O,P,Q,R,S,T,U,
...V,W,X,Y,Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evergreen
...Heather Shrub
...Heather Index
......Andromeda
......Bruckenthalia
......Calluna
......Daboecia
......Erica: Carnea
......Erica: Cinerea
......Erica: Others
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evergreen
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...A1,2,B,C,D,E,F,G,
...H,I,J,K,L,M,N,
...O,P1,2,Q,R,S,T,U,
...V,W,XYZ,
...Diascia Photo Album,
...UK Peony Index

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron

Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use - page links in row 6. Rose, RHS Wisley and Other Roses rose indices on each Rose Use page
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Pruning Methods
Photo Index
R 1, 2, 3
Peter Beales Roses
RV Roger
Roses

Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable
Wild Flower and
Butterfly page links are in next row


Topic -
Butterflies in the UK mostly use native UK wildflowers.

Butterfly Species.

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly Usage
of Plants.

Plant Usage by
Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly.

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Botanical Names
...Cream Common Names
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note

Poisonous
Wildflower Plants.


You know its name, use
Wild Flower Plant Index a-h, i-p, q-z.
You know which habitat it lives in, use
on
Acid Soil,
on
Calcareous
(Chalk) Soil
,
on
Marine Soil,
on
Neutral Soil,
is a
Fern,
is a
Grass,
is a
Rush, or
is a
Sedge.
You have seen its flower, use Comparison Pages containing Wild Flower Plants and Cultivated Plants in the
Colour Wheel Gallery.

Each plant named in each of the 180 Wildflower Family Pages within their 23 Galleries may have a link to:-
1) its Plant Description Page in its Common Name column in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links,
2) to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name column,
3) to see photos in its Flowering Months column and
4) to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

WILD FLOWER FAMILY PAGE MENU
(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech
(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest
(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels
(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 1

(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 2

(o)Grass Soft
Bromes 3

(o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower
Clover 1

(o)Peaflower
Clover 2

(o)Peaflower
Clover 3

(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew


Topic -
The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process

dependent on the Garden Style chosen
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index


Topic -
Flower/Foliage Colour Wheel Galleries with number of colours as a high-level Plant Selection Process

All Flowers 53 with
...Use of Plant and
Flower Shape
- page links in bottom row

All Foliage 53
instead of redundant
...(All Foliage 212)


All Flowers
per Month 12


Bee instead of wind pollinated plants for hay-fever sufferers
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers
per Month
12
...Index

Rock Garden and Alpine Flowers
Rock Plant Flowers 53
INDEX
A, B, C, D, E, F,
G, H, I, J, K, L,
M, NO, PQ, R, S,
T, UVWXYZ
...Rock Plant Photos

Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours
per Month Index

...All Plants Index


Topic -
Use of Plant in your Plant Selection Process

Plant Colour Wheel Uses
with
1. Perfect general use soil is composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand, and
2. Why you are continually losing the SOIL STRUCTURE so your soil - will revert to clay, chalk, sand or silt.
Uses of Plant and Flower Shape:-
...Foliage Only
...Other than Green Foliage
...Trees in Lawn
...Trees in Small Gardens
...Wildflower Garden
...Attract Bird
...Attract Butterfly
1
, 2
...Climber on House Wall
...Climber not on House Wall
...Climber in Tree
...Rabbit-Resistant
...Woodland
...Pollution Barrier
...Part Shade
...Full Shade
...Single Flower provides Pollen for Bees
1
, 2, 3
...Ground-Cover
<60
cm
60-180cm
>180cm
...Hedge
...Wind-swept
...Covering Banks
...Patio Pot
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border
...Poisonous
...Adjacent to Water
...Bog Garden
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Winter-Flowering
...Fragrant
...Not Fragrant
...Exhibition
...Standard Plant is 'Ball on Stick'
...Upright Branches or Sword-shaped leaves
...Plant to Prevent Entry to Human or Animal
...Coastal Conditions
...Tolerant on North-facing Wall
...Cut Flower
...Potted Veg Outdoors
...Potted Veg Indoors
...Thornless
...Raised Bed Outdoors Veg
...Grow in Alkaline Soil A-F, G-L, M-R,
S-Z
...Grow in Acidic Soil
...Grow in Any Soil
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Grow Bulbs Indoors

Uses of Bedding
...Bedding Out
...Filling In
...Screen-ing
...Pots and Troughs
...Window Boxes
...Hanging Baskets
...Spring Bedding
...Summer Bedding
...Winter Bedding
...Foliage instead of Flower
...Coleus Bedding Photos for use in Public Domain 1

Uses of Bulb
...Other than Only Green Foliage
...Bedding or Mass Planting
...Ground-Cover
...Cut-Flower
...Tolerant of Shade
...In Woodland Areas
...Under-plant
...Tolerant of Poor Soil
...Covering Banks
...In Water
...Beside Stream or Water Garden
...Coastal Conditions
...Edging Borders
...Back of Border or Back-ground Plant
...Fragrant Flowers
...Not Fragrant Flowers
...Indoor
House-plant

...Grow in a Patio Pot
...Grow in an Alpine Trough
...Grow in an Alpine House
...Grow in Rock Garden
...Speciman Plant
...Into Native Plant Garden
...Naturalize in Grass
...Grow in Hanging Basket
...Grow in Window-box
...Grow in Green-house
...Grow in Scree
...Naturalized Plant Area
...Grow in Cottage Garden
...Attracts Butterflies
...Attracts Bees
...Resistant to Wildlife
...Bulb in Soil:-
......Chalk
......Clay
......Sand
......Lime-Free (Acid)
......Peat

Uses of Rose
Rose Index

...Bedding 1, 2
...Climber /Pillar
...Cut-Flower 1, 2
...Exhibition, Speciman
...Ground-Cover
...Grow In A Container 1, 2
...Hedge 1, 2
...Climber in Tree
...Woodland
...Edging Borders
...Tolerant of Poor Soil 1, 2
...Tolerant of Shade
...Back of Border
...Adjacent to Water
...Page for rose use as ARCH ROSE, PERGOLA ROSE, COASTAL CONDITIONS ROSE, WALL ROSE, STANDARD ROSE, COVERING BANKS or THORNLESS ROSES.
...FRAGRANT ROSES
...NOT FRAGRANT ROSES


Topic -
Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag it to your desktop as part of a Plant Selection Process:-

RHS Garden at Wisley

Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year. Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.

Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1

with Plant Supports
1, 5, 10
Plants
2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall

Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden

Roses Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger

Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,
R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166

Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord - 1036 photos only inserted so far - Garden Flowers - Start Page of each Gallery
AB1 ,AN14,BA27,
CH40,CR52,DR63,
FR74,GE85,HE96,

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 1187
A 1, 2, Photos - 43
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Photos - 411
with Plants causing damage to buildings in Chilham Village and Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 85
with Label Problems
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, 2, 3,
Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
with Work Done by Chris Garnons-Williams
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens - 88
Flower Colour, Num of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-
Rock Garden
within linked page

 

Topic -
Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell:-

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2


Topic -
Website User Guidelines


My Gas Service Engineer found Flow and Return pipes incorrectly positioned on gas boilers and customers had refused to have positioning corrected in 2020.
 

 

 

Plant Botanical Name:
MM, MN, MO, MP

 

Plant Botanical Name:
MQ, MR, MS, MT

 

Plant Botanical Name:
MU, MV, MW, MXYZ

MM

MQ

MU

 

 

Mulch
Moorland Cottage Plants - Adjacent to the car park there is a large border. It is informally planted with a mixture of trees and shrubs to provide a low maintenace area. In recent years we have been experimenting with mulches generated from our own prunings. Now the border is only weeded and pruned once a year and the mulch is topped up. Truly low maintenance!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MN

MR

MV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MO

MS

MW

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Collection of Monarda at Glyn Bach Gardens. Keep soil moist in summer
Monarda 'Gardenview Scarlet
' -
Hp-Erect Red Bac Bed-Mass Bee
Wild-Butterfly Nat-Gro
'Schneewittchen' - Hp-Erect White
Sha Fra Edg Bed-Mass Bee
Wild-Butterfly
'Scorpion' - Hp-Erect Other Sha Bee
Bac
'Violet Queen' - Hp-Clump Other
Cut Sha Wild-Butterfly Fra Grow
with ornamental grasses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MP

MT

MXYZ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Myrtus communis - Es-Upright
becoming Arching with age. White
Fru-Wild-Berries eaten by birds
to disperse the seeds Walls-South-
or West-facing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Form of Perennials, Annuals, Bulbs, Climbers:-
Mat-forming.
Stems densely cover the ground and the flowers extend above.
Prostrate or Trailing.
Stems spread out on the ground and the flowers are borne close to the foliage.
Cushion or Mound-forming.
Tightly packed stems form a low clump and the flowers are close to the foliage.
Spreading or Creeping.
Stems extend horizontally then ascend, forming a densely packed mass.
Clump-forming.
Leaf-stalks and flower stems arise at ground level to form a dense mass.
Stemless.
Leaf-stalks and flower stems arise at ground level.
Erect or Upright.
Upright stems stand vertical, supporting leaves and the flowers.
Climbing and Scandent.
Long flexible stems are supported by other plants or structures.
Arching.
Long upright stems arch over from the upright towards the ground.

------

What to do about Subsidence caused by Clay? Page explains what to do about trees/shrubs/hedges that may damage the foundations of your property.
What happened to a new building, which was caused by the builder, 6 years after it was built. The new owner was then landed with a large bill. The Builder warranty is first 2 years, then years 3-10 can be covered by NHBC Buildmark.

Most modern houses cannot afford large shrubs, trees or hedges within 10 feet = 120 inches = 300cms of a house wall or a garden wall, so it is best to use:-
Growing Edibles in Containers inside your home,
and
Soft Fruit List with soft fruit bush (Blueberry, Gooseberry, Blackcurrant, Redcurrant, Whitecurrant or Jostaberry) instead of a shrub from the shrub lists provides you with the size of shrub suitable for most current gardens.
The Raspberry may be used as a mini-hedge in the garden to separate areas or against your boundary fences/walls.
The Blackberry, Boysenberry and Tayberry cane climbers can also be used as mini-hedges or to clothe walls/fences/pergolas.
They all provide you with edible fruit. The Soft Fruit Gallery compares colour photographs of some soft fruits,
and
Choosing a top fruit tree or remaining top fruit instead of a tree from the tree list provides you with a plant of a size that is suitable for most current gardens. These trees also produce edible fruit. Further details in these galleries -
Top Fruit Apple, Cherry, Pear
or
You could use 1 of the trees from the Deciduous and Evergreen Trees suitable for Small Gardens.

------

The overall amount of sunlight received depends on aspect, the direction your garden faces:-
North-facing gardens get the least light and can be damp.
South-facing gardens get the most light.
East-facing gardens get morning light.
West-facing gardens get afternoon and evening light.

-----

Acid Site - An acid soil has a pH value below 7.0. Clay soils are usually acid and retentive of moisture, requiring drainage. The addition of grit or coarse sand makes them more manageable. Peaty soil is acidic with fewer nutrients and also requires drainage.
Alkaline Soil - An alkaline soil has a pH value above 7.0. Soils that form a thin layer over chalk restrict plant selection to those tolerant of drought.
Bank / Slope problems include soil erosion, surface water, summer drought and poor access (create path using mattock to pull an earth section 180 degrees over down the slope). Then, stabilise the earth with 4 inches (10cms) depth of spent mushroom compost under the chicken wire; before planting climbers/plants through it.
Cold Exposed Inland Site is an area that is open to the elements and that includes cold, biting winds, the glare of full sun, frost and snow - These plants are able to withstand very low temperatures and those winds in the South of England.

Tree/Shrub Shape:-

columnarshape1a1a1aColumnar Tree/Shrub Form

A tree shape designed by nature to be a haven for nesting birds.

ovalshape1a1a1aOval Tree/Shrub Form

 

 

 

roundedshape1a1a1aRounded or Spherical Tree/Shrub Form

 

 

 

flattenedsphericalshape1a1a1aFlattened Spherical Tree/Shrub Form

 

 

 

narrowconicalshape1a1a1aNarrow Conical/ Narrow Pyramidal Tree/Shrub Form.
These are neat and shapely, thus being trees for the tidy gardener. The narrowness of the tree means that bands of dense shade sweep across the garden - never creating dense shade in one area all day.

broadconicalshape1a1a1aBroad Conical/ Broad Pyramidal Tree/Shrub Form.

These are neat and shapely, thus being trees for the tidy gardener.

eggshapedshape1a1a1aOvoid/ Egg-Shaped Tree/Shrub Shape

 

 

 

broadovoidshape1a1a1aBroad Ovoid Tree/Shrub Shape

Broad-headed trees usually cast a large area of light dappled shade and have broad spreading branches so loved by birds and animals.

-----

Surface soil moisture is the water that is in the upper 10 cm (4 inches) of soil, whereas root zone soil moisture is the water that is available to plants, which is generally considered to be in the upper 200 cm (80 inches) of soil:-
Wet Soil has Saturated water content of 20-50% water/soil and is Fully saturated soil.
Moist Soil has Field capacity of 10-35% water/soil and is Soil moisture 2–3 days after a rain or irrigation.
Dry Soil has Permanent wilting point of 1-25% water/soil and is Minimum soil moisture at which a plant wilts.
Residual water content of 0.1-10% water/soil and is Remaining water at high tension.
Available Water Capacity for plants is the difference between water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point.

-----

Dust and Pollution Barrier - Plants with large horizontal leaves are particularly effective in filtering dust from the environment, with mature trees being capable of filtering up to 70% of dust particles caused by traffic. Plants can also help offset the pollution effects of traffic. 20 trees are needed to absorb the carbon dioxide produced by 1 car driven for 60 miles.
Front of Border / Path Edges - Soften edges for large masses of paving or lawn with groundcover plants. Random areas Within Paths can be planted with flat-growing plants. Other groundcover plants are planted in the Rest of Border.

Tree/Shrub Shape:-

invertedovoidshape1a1a1aNarrow Vase-Shaped/ Inverted Ovoid Tree/Shrub Shape

 

 

fanshaped1a1a1a1Fan-Shaped/ Vase-Shaped Tree/Shrub Shape

 

 

 

broadfanshapedshape1a1a1aBroad Fan-Shaped/ Broad Vase-Shaped Tree/Shrub Shape

Broad-headed trees usually cast a large area of light dappled shade and have broad spreading branches so loved by birds and animals.

narrowweepingshape1a1a1aNarrow Weeping Tree/Shrub Shape

Very useful for children to use as a secret den. The narrowness of the tree means that bands of dense shade sweep across the garden - never creating dense shade in one area all day.

broadweepingshape1a1a1aBroad Weeping Tree/Shrub Shape

 

 

 

Single-stemmed Palm, Cycad, or similar tree Tree/Shrub Shape

Multi-stemmed Palm, Cycad, or similar Tree Tree/Shrub Shape

-----

Other uses of plants:-
Crevices Garden Use
Hanging Basket Use
Large Leaves Use
Pollution Barrier 1, 2 Use
Rock Garden Use
Thorny Hedge Use
Trees for Lawns Use
Windbreak Use
Non-Tree Plants in Woodland Use
Gardens by the Bay is the place to find perfect companions for all your bulbs, perennials and ornamental grasses.

-----

Sun Aspect:-
Full Sun: At least 6 full hours of direct sunlight. Many sun lovers enjoy more than 6 hours per day, but need regular water to endure the heat.
Part Shade: 3 - 6 hours of sun each day, preferably in the morning and early afternoon. The plant will need some relief from the intense late afternoon sun, either from shade provided by a nearby tree or planting it on the east side of a building.
Dappled Sun - DS in Part Shade Column: Dappled sunlight is similar to partial shade. It is the sun that makes its way through the branches of a deciduous tree. Woodland plants and underplantings prefer this type of sunlight over even the limited direct exposure they would get from partial shade.
Full Shade: Less than 3 hours of direct sunlight each day, with filtered sunlight during the rest of the day. Full shade does not mean no sun.

-----

Seaside Plants that deal with salt-carrying gales and blown sand; by you using copious amounts of compost and thick mulch to conserve soil moisture.
Sound Barrier - The sound waves passing through the plant interact with leaves and branches, some being deflected and some being turned into heat energy. A wide band of planting is necessary to achieve a large reduction in the decibel level.
Wind Barrier - By planting a natural windbreak you will create a permeable barrier that lets a degree of air movement pass through it and provide shelter by as far as 30 times their height downwind.
Woodland ground cover under the shade of tree canopies.

Botanical Index Gallery Pages

Appended to Botanical Name is
'Plant Type' space 'Flower Colour' space 'Plant Use'

A, B, C, D, E,
F, G, H, I, J, K,
L, M, N, O, P, Q,
R, S, T, U, V, W,
X, Y, Z,
Bedding,
Fern,
Hedging,
Illiterate UK Workforce,
Plant Use and Flower Shape,
Wildflowers in UK used by Butterflies

Links to Indexed Plants in the galleries below are in addition to the ones above:-

Bee pollinated plants per flower colour per month in Bee-Pollinated


Rock Garden, Alpine Flowers appended to relevant pages in this gallery from

Rock Flowers
with
Rock Garden

Alpines, Aquatic, Annual, Beddi-ng, Biennial and Bulb with Clim-ber of 3 sector system are in Infill

Fragrant Plant Index pages in Right Hand Table

4000x3000 pixel Camera Photo Index in Right Hand Table

Plant Type:-
Al = Alpine
Aq = Aquatic
An = Annual from Photo Coleus Index for different uses, Biennial
Ba = Bamboo
Be = Bedding
Bu = Bulb
Cl = Climber
Co = Conifer
Ds = Deciduous Shrub
Dt = Deciduous Tree
Ep = Evergreen Perennial
Es = Evergreen Shrub
Et = Evergreen Tree
Fe = Fern
Gr = Grass
Hed = Hedging
Hp = Herbaceous Perennial
Her = Herb
Od = Odds and Sods
Rg = Plant for Rock
Garden (Alpines)
Rh = Rhododendron, Azalea, Camellia
Ro = Rose
So = Soft Fruit
To = Top Fruit
Ve = Links are in the Vegetable Gallery where Companion Planting is also used.
Wi = Links to UK Wildflower Botanical Names and Common Names are in the Right Hand Table
and
Wildflowers used by Butterflies

Gr = Grass
Link in Plant Type is to either Index A of that type or to the Index in the right hand table on each page of that folder
=
Link(s) in expansion is to another folder in this ivydenegardens.co.uk website

Flower Colour:-
Other
Orange
Pink
Red
White
Yellow
2 Colours

followed by
Plant Use:-
Alp = in Alpine Garden
Arc = Climb Arch, Pergola, Fence, Trellis
Bac = Back of Border
Ban = Cover Banks
Bed = Bedding, Mass Planting
Bee = Bee pollinated for Hay Fever Sufferers
Cli = Climber/Pillar
Coast = in Coastal Area
Cott = in Cottage Garden
Cut = Cut-Flower
Edib = Edible
Edg = Edging Border
Exh = Exhibition
Fra = Fragrant
Fru = Fruit, Berry, Nut
Fless = Free of Frost
Gra = in Grassland
Gro = Ground-Cover
Hed = Hedge,
Plant in Hedge,
Screen, Windbreak
Herb = in Herb Garden
Hip = Produces Hips, Seed-Head

Annual, Bulb, Climber,
Perennial Form & Shrub/Tree Shape details below

Parts of a Flower by American Museum of Natural History

Inv = Invasive; so pot the plant instead
Mid = Middle of Border
Nat = Naturalize
Nor = North-facing Wall
Pois = Poisonous
Pot = Grow in Pot
PotGr = Pot in Greenhouse, Conservatory, Houseplant, Alpine House
Pout = Plant Supportless
Psoil = Tolerates Poor Soil
Psup = Plant Supported
Sha = Tolerates Shade, Part Shade, Shade Part of Day
Roc = Rock Garden, Cliff, Scree, Gravel, Crevice
San = on Sand Dunes
Shr = Climber in Shrubs
Spe = Speciman
Sta = Grow as Standard
Swo = Sword-shaped leaf
Tho = Thorns repel
Tless = Thornless
Tre = Climber in Tree
Und = Underplant
Veg = in Vegetable Garden
Wal = Grow as Wall Rose
Walls = Grows on Walls
Wat = Grow next to Water
Wet = Grow in Wet Soil
Wild = Attracts Wildlife
Woo = Woodland

Garden Design
...Use the Colour Wheel Concepts to select Plants.
From viewing Lost Flowers with the Walkabout, Un-Labelled Bedding Plant, Permanent Herbaceous Plant and RHS Design Errors pages, I state: 'There is room for improvement in the RHS Mixed Border of Wisley' in 2013-14. The above pages are within:-
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports

Right Hand Table

Botanical Name with Common Name, Wild Flower Family, Flower Colour and Form Index of each of all the Wildflowers of the UK in 1965:- AC, AG,AL,AL,AN,
AR,AR,AS,BA,
BR,BR,CA,CA,
CA,CA,CA,CA,
CA,CE,CE,CH,
CI,CO,CR,DA,
DE,DR,EP,EP,
ER,EU,FE,FO,
GA,GA,GE,GL,
HE,HI,HI,HY,
IM,JU,KI,LA,
LE,LI,LL,LU,LY, ME,ME,MI,MY,
NA,OE,OR,OR,
PA,PH,PL,PO,
PO,PO,PO,PU,
RA,RH,RO,RO,
RU,SA,SA,SA,
SC,SC,SE,SI,
SI,SO,SP,ST,
TA,TH,TR,TR,
UR,VE,VE,VI

Extra Botanical Names have been added within a row for a different plant. Each Extra Botanical Name Plant will link to an Extras Page where it will be detailed in its own row.

EXTRAS 91,
 

 

Common Name with Botanical Name, Wild Flower Family, Flower Colour and Form Index of each of all the Wildflowers of the UK in 1965:- AC,AL,AS,BE,
BL,BO,BR,CA,
CL,CO,CO,CO,
CR,DA,DO,EA,
FE,FI,FR,GO,
GR,GU,HA,HO,
IR,KN,LE,LE,
LO,MA,ME,MO,
NA,NO,PE,PO,
PY,RE,RO,SA,
SE,SE,SK,SM,
SO,SP,ST,SW,
TO,TW,WA,WE,
WI,WO,WO,YE

Extra Common Names have been added within a row for a different plant. Each Extra Common Name Plant will link to an Extras Page where it will be detailed in its own row.

EXTRAS 57,58,
59,60,61,62,
63,64,

 

You have the wildflower plants of the UK details above, with their flower colours and habitats in these 5 rows, so WHY NOT USE THEM WITH THE CULTIVATED PLANTS IN YOUR OWN GARDEN?

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

FLOWER COLOUR Comparison Page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery with Continuation Pages from Page 2

...Blue - its page links in next 4 rows.
Use of Plant with Flowers

...Brown Botanical Names

...Cream Common Names, Coastal and Dunes, Sandy Shores and Dunes

...Green Broad-leaved Woods

...Mauve Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk

...Multi-Cols Heaths and Moors

...Orange Hedgerows and Verges

...Pink A-G Lakes, Canals and Rivers

...Pink H-Z Marshes, Fens, Bogs

...Purple Old Buildings and Walls

...Red Pinewoods

...White A-D Saltmarshes. Shingle Beaches, Rocks and Cliff Tops

...White E-P Other

...White Q-Z Number of Petals


...Yellow A-G Pollinator

...Yellow H-Z Poisonous Parts

...Shrub/Tree River Banks and Other Freshwater Margins

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Lists of:-

Edible Plant Parts.

Flower Legend.

Food for
Butterfly/Moth
.

Flowering plants of Chalk and Limestone Page 1
Page 2

Flowering plants of Acid Soil
Page 1

SEED COLOUR
Seed 1
Seed 2

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Habitat Lists:-

Coastal and Dunes.

Broad-leaved
Woods
.

Grassland - Acid, Neutral, Chalk.

Heaths and Moors.

Hedgerows and Verges.

Lakes, Canals and Rivers.

Marshes, Fens,
Bogs
.

Old Buildings and Walls.

Pinewoods.

River Banks and
other Freshwater Margins
.

Saltmarshes.

Sandy Shores and Dunes.

Shingle Beaches, Rocks and
Cliff Tops
.

Other.
 

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Number of Petals List:-
Without Petals. Other plants
without flowers.
1 Petal or
Composite of
many 1 Petal Flowers as Disc
or Ray Floret .
2 Petals.
3 Petals.
4 Petals.
5 Petals.
6 Petals.
Over 6 Petals.

BLUE WILD FLOWER GALLERY
PAGE MENU

 

Lists of:-

Pollinator.

Poisonous Parts.

Scented Flower, Foliage, Root.

Story of their Common Names.

Use of Plant with Flowers

Use for Non-Flowering Plants

 


The following is a complete hierarchical Plant Selection Process
dependent on the Garden Style chosen
Garden Style
...
Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...
All Plants Index
...
Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...
Shape, Form
Index

 


Fragrant Plants as a Plant Selection Process for your sense of smell:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an Acid Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves
1
, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers
1
, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit
1
, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers
1
, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants
1
, 2

 


Camera Photo Galleries showing all 4000 x 3000 pixels of each photo on your screen that you can then click and drag it to your desktop as part of a Plant Selection Process:-

RHS Garden at Wisley
Plant Supports -
When supporting plants in a bed, it is found that not only do those plants grow upwards, but also they expand their roots and footpad sideways each year.
Pages
1
, 2, 3, 8, 11,
12, 13,
Plants 4, 7, 10,
Bedding Plants 5,
Plant Supports for Unknown Plants 5
,
Clematis Climbers 6,
the RHS does not appear to either follow it's own pruning advice or advice from The Pruning of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers by George E. Brown.
ISBN 0-571-11084-3 with the plants in Pages 1-7 of this folder. You can see from looking at both these resources as to whether the pruning carried out on the remainder of the plants in Pages 7-15 was correct.
Narcissus (Daffodil) 9,
Phlox Plant Supports 14, 15

Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, Index

National Trust Garden at Sissinghurst Castle
Plant Supports -
Pages for Gallery 1
with Plant Supports
1, 5, 10
Plants
2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9,
11, 12
Recommended Rose Pruning Methods 13
Pages for Gallery 2
with Plant Supports
2
,
Plants 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Dry Garden of
RHS Garden at
Hyde Hall
Plants - Pages
without Plant Supports
Plants 1
, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Nursery of
Peter Beales Roses
Display Garden
Roses Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Nursery of
RV Roger
Roses - Pages
A1,A2,A3,A4,A5,
A6,A7,A8,A9,A10,
A11,A12,A13,A14,
B15,
B16,B17,B18,B19,
B20,
B21,B22,B23,B24,
B25,
B26,B27,B28,B29,
B30,
C31,C32,C33,C34,
C35,
C36,C37,C38,C39,
C40,
C41,CD2,D43,D44,
D45,
D46,D47,D48,D49,
E50,
E51,E52,F53,F54,
F55,
F56,F57,G58,G59,
H60,
H61,I62,K63,L64,
M65,
M66,N67,P68,P69,
P70,
R71,R72,S73,S74,
T75,
V76,Z77, 78,

Damage by Plants in Chilham Village - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4

Pavements of Funchal, Madeira
Damage to Trees - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13
for trees 1-54,
14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25,
for trees 55-95,
26, 27, 28, 29, 30,
31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
36, 37,
for trees 95-133,
38, 39, 40,
41, 42, 43, 44, 45,
for trees 133-166

Chris Garnons-Williams
Work Done - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12, 13

Identity of Plants
Label Problems - Pages
1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11

Ron and Christine Foord - 1036 photos only inserted so far - Garden Flowers - Start Page of each Gallery
AB1 ,AN14,BA27,
CH40,CR52,DR63,
FR74,GE85,HE96,

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens - 1187
A 1, 2, Photos - 43
B 1, Photos - 13
C 1, Photos - 35
D 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
Photos - 411
with Plants causing damage to buildings in Chilham Village and Damage to Trees in Pavements of Funchal
E 1, Photos - 21
F 1, Photos - 1
G 1, Photos - 5
H 1, Photos - 21
I 1, Photos - 8
J 1, Photos - 1
K 1, Photos - 1
L 1, Photos - 85
with Label Problems
M 1, Photos - 9
N 1, Photos - 12
O 1, Photos - 5
P 1, Photos - 54
Q 1, Photos -
R 1, 2, 3,
Photos - 229
S 1, Photos - 111
T 1, Photos - 13
U 1, Photos - 5
V 1, Photos - 4
W 1, Photos - 100
with Work Done by Chris Garnons-Williams
X 1 Photos -
Y 1, Photos -
Z 1 Photos -
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens - 88
Flower Colour, Num of Petals, Shape and
Plant Use of:-
Rock Garden
within linked page


The Center for Water Efficient Landscaping (CWEL)
mission is to promote water conservation through environmentally, socially, and economically sound landscape management practices in Utah, USA. Same principles apply wherever water is in short supply.
 

Why not gift a Container Garden Veg Patch Experience to your friend or your school?
From our farm in Cornwall, England we sow and grow thousands of organic vegetable plug plants, herbs and potted fruits ready to be delivered to your garden gate at just the right time for planting out.

Why not grow them inside your home using Amberol self-watering rectangular containers and the potting mix from my Vegetable Gallery?


Carbon Life Cycle uses Miscanthus for Power Stations leading to carbon neutral green renewable electricity and 7 other markets by Terravesta in the UK.
 

Connon Nurseries. - "is one of Canada's largest wholesale nurseries serving customers throughout Canada and several Northeastern U.S. states. We offer more than 4,000 varieties of high-quality trees, shrubs, perennials, green-roof plants, and more. We rely on more than 100 specialty nurseries from across Canada, the U.S. and Europe to grow specific stock to round out our own inventory. See its library and its plants for Green Roofs with Sempergreen Vegetation Mats for any type of roof, roundabout, central reservation or roof terrace."

Cultural Needs of Plants
from Chapter 4 in Fern Grower's Manual by Barbara Joe Hoshizaki & Robbin C. Moran. Revised and Expanded Edition. Published in 2001 by Timber Press, Inc. Reprinted 2002, 2006. ISBN-13:978-0-
88192-495-4.

"Understanding Fern Needs
Ferns have the same basic growing requirements as other plants and will thrive when these are met. There is nothing mysterious about the requirements - they are not something known only to people with green thumbs - but the best gardeners are those who understand plant requirements and are careful about satisfying them.
What, then, does a fern need?

All plants need water.
Water in the soil prevents roots from drying, and all mineral nutrients taken up by the roots must be dissolved in the soil water. Besides water in the soil, most plants need water in the air. Adequate humidity keeps the plant from drying out. Leaves need water for photosynthesis and to keep from wilting.
All green plants need light to manufacture food (sugars) by photosynthesis. Some plants need more light than others, and some can flourish in sun or shade. Most ferns, however, prefer some amount of shade.
For photosynthesis, plants require carbon dioxide, a gas that is exhaled by animals as waste. Carbon dioxide diffuses into plants through tiny pores, called stomata, that abound on the lower surface of the leaves. In the leaf, carbon dioxide is combined with the hydrogen from water to form carbohydrates, the plant's food. This process takes place only in the presence of light and chlorophyll, a green pigment found in plant cells. To enhance growth, some commercial growers increase the carbon dioxide level in their greenhouses to 600ppm (parts per million), or twice the amount typically found in the air.
Plants need oxygen. The green plants of a plant do not require much oxygen from the air because plants produce more oxygen by photosynthesis than they use. The excess oxygen liberated from the plants is used by all animals, including humans. What do plants do with oxygen? They use it just as we do, to release the energy stored in food. We use energy to move about, to talk, to grow, to think - in fact, for all our life processes. Although plants don't talk or move much, they do grow and metabolize and must carry on all their life processes using oxygen to release the stored energy in their food.
Roots need air all the time. They get it from the air spaces between the soil particles. Overwatering displaces the air between soil particles with water, thereby removing the oxygen needed by the roots. This reduces the root's ability to absorb mineral nutrients and can foster root-rot.
Plants need minerals to grow properly. The minerals are mined from the soil by the plant's root system. If a certain mineral is missing, such as calcium needed for developing cell walls, then the plant will be stunted, discoloured, or deformed.
Some plants tolerate a wide range of temperatures, whereas others are fussy. If the temperature is too high or low, the machinery of the plant will not operate satisfactorily or will cease entirely.

The basic needs of plants are not hard to supply, but growing success depends on attending to these needs with care and exactitude. The remainder of this chapter is devoted to a discussion of these requirements, with the exception of mineral needs, which are discussed in Chapter 5."

 

It is worth remembering that especially with roses that the colour of the petals of the flower may change - The following photos are of Rosa 'Lincolnshire Poacher' which I took on the same day in R.V. Roger's Nursery Field:-

poacherrose1garnonswilliams

Closed Bud

poacherrose2garnonswilliams

Opening Bud

poacherrose3garnonswilliams

Juvenile Flower

poacherrose4garnonswilliams

Older Juvenile Flower

poacherrose5garnonswilliams

Middle-aged Flower - Flower Colour in Season in its
Rose Description Page is
"Buff Yellow, with a very slight pink tint at the edges in May-October."

poacherrose6garnonswilliams

Mature Flower

poacherrose7garnonswilliams

Juvenile Flower and Dying Flower

poacherrose8garnonswilliams

Form of Rose Bush

There are 720 roses in the Rose Galleries; many of which have the above series of pictures in their respective Rose Description Page.

So one might avoid the disappointment that the 2 elephants had when their trunks were entwined instead of them each carrying their trunk using their own trunk, and your disappointment of buying a rose to discover that the colour you bought it for is only the case when it has its juvenile flowers; if you look at all the photos of the roses in the respective Rose Description Page!!!!