Topic
Case Studies
...Drive
...Foundations

Companion
Planting

...A, B, C, D, E,
...F, G, H, I, J, K,
...L, M, N, O, P, Q,
...R, S, T, U, V, W,
...X, Y, Z
...Pest Control
...using Plants

Garden Construction
Garden Design *
...How to Use the Colour Wheel Concepts for Selection of Flowers, Foliage and Flower Shape
...RHS Mixed Borders
......Bedding Plants
......Her Perennials
......Other Plants
......Camera photos of Plant supports
Garden Maintenance
Glossary
Home
Library
Offbeat Glossary
Plants
...Poisonous Plants
Soil
...Soil Nutrients
Tool Shed
Useful Data

................

Topic - Plant Photo Galleries with many
Camera Photo Galleries just before the Wildflower Family Pages

Plant with Photo Index of Ivydene Gardens
A 1,
B 1,
C 1,
D 1,
E 1,
F 1,
G 1,
H 1,
I 1,
J 1,
K 1,
L 1,
M 1,
N 1,
O 1,
P 1,
Q 1,
R 1,
S 1,
T 1,
U 1,
V 1,
W 1,
X 1
Y 1,
Z 1
Articles/Items in Ivydene Gardens
Flower Shape and Plant Use of
Bedding
Bulb
Evergreen Perennial
Herbaceous Perennial
Rose


Aquatic
Bamboo
Bedding
...by Flower Shape

...Camera photos of Coleus Bedding Foliage Trial
Bulb
...Allium/ Anemone
...Autumn
...Colchicum/ Crocus
...Dahlia
...Gladiolus
...Hippeastrum/ Lily
...Late Summer
...Narcissus
...Spring
...Tulip
...Winter
Climber
...Clematis
...Climbers
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
...Shrubs - Decid
Deciduous Tree
...Trees - Decid
Evergreen Perennial
...P-Evergreen A-L
...P-Evergreen M-Z
...Flower Shape
Evergreen Shrub
...Shrubs - Evgr
...Heather Shrub
Evergreen Tree
...Trees - Evgr
Fern
Grass
Hedging
Herbaceous
Perennial

...P -Herbaceous
...Peony
...Flower Shape
...RHS Wisley
......Mixed Border
......Other Borders
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
...RHS Wisley A-F
...RHS Wisley G-R
...RHS Wisley S-Z
...Rose Use
...Other Roses A-F
...Other Roses G-R
...Other Roses S-Z
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
...Apple

...Cherry
...Pear
Vegetable

Wild Flower
with its
flower colour page,
space,
Site Map page in its flower colour
NOTE Gallery
...Blue Note
...Brown Note
...Cream Note
...Green Note
...Mauve Note
...Multi-Cols Note
...Orange Note
...Pink A-G Note
...Pink H-Z Note
...Purple Note
...Red Note
...White A-D Note
...White E-P Note
...White Q-Z Note
...Yellow A-G Note
...Yellow H-Z Note
...Shrub/Tree Note
Poisonous
Wildflower Plants

............

Topic - Flower/Foliage Colour
Colour Wheel Galleries

Following your choice using Garden Style then that changes your Plant Selection Process
Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

or
you could use these Flower Colour Wheels with number of colours
All Flowers 53

All Flowers per Month 12
with its
Explanation of
Structure of this Website with

...User Guidelines
All Bee-Pollinated Flowers per Month 12
...Index
Rock Garden and Alpine Flower Colour Wheel with number of colours
Rock Plant Flowers 53

...Rock Plant Photos

or
these Foliage Colour Wheels structures, which I have done but until I can take the photos and I am certain of the plant label's validity, these may not progress much further
All Foliage 212

All Spring Foliage 212
All Summer Foliage 212
All Autumn Foliage 212
All Winter Foliage 212

or
Flower Colour Wheel without photos, but with links to photos
12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index

............

Topic - Wildlife on Plant Photo Gallery
Butterfly
Usage of Plants
by Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly

Egg, Caterpillar, Chrysalis and Butterfly usage of
Plant A-C
Plant C-M
Plant N-W
Butterfly usage of Plant

followed by all the Wild Flower Family Pages:-

There are 180 families in the Wildflowers of the UK and they have been split up into 22 Galleries to allow space for up to 100 plants per gallery.

Each plant named in each of the Wildflower Family Pages may have a link to:-

its Plant Description Page in its Common Name in one of those Wildflower Plant Galleries and will have links

to external sites to purchase the plant or seed in its Botanical Name,

to see photos in its Flowering Months and

to read habitat details in its Habitat Column.

 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 1

(o)Adder's Tongue
Amaranth
(o)Arrow-Grass
(o)Arum
(o)Balsam
Bamboo
(o)Barberry
(o)Bedstraw
(o)Beech

(o)Bellflower
(o)Bindweed
(o)Birch
(o)Birds-Nest

(o)Birthwort
(o)Bogbean
(o)Bog Myrtle
(o)Borage
(o)Box
(o)Broomrape
(o)Buckthorn
(o)Buddleia
(o)Bur-reed
(o)Buttercup
(o)Butterwort
(o)Cornel (Dogwood)
(o)Crowberry
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 1
(o)Crucifer (Cabbage/Mustard) 2
Cypress
(o)Daffodil
(o)Daisy
(o)Daisy Cudweeds
(o)Daisy Chamomiles
(o)Daisy Thistle
(o)Daisy Catsears (o)Daisy Hawkweeds
(o)Daisy Hawksbeards
(o)Daphne
(o)Diapensia
(o)Dock Bistorts
(o)Dock Sorrels

 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 2
(o)Clubmoss
(o)Duckweed
(o)Eel-Grass
(o)Elm
(o)Filmy Fern
(o)Horsetail
(o)Polypody
Quillwort
(o)Royal Fern
(o)Figwort - Mulleins
(o)Figwort - Speedwells
(o)Flax
(o)Flowering-Rush
(o)Frog-bit
(o)Fumitory
(o)Gentian
(o)Geranium
(o)Glassworts
(o)Gooseberry
(o)Goosefoot
(o)Grass 1
(o)Grass 2
(o)Grass 3
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 1
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 2
(o)Grass Soft Bromes 3 (o)Hazel
(o)Heath
(o)Hemp
(o)Herb-Paris
(o)Holly
(o)Honeysuckle
(o)Horned-Pondweed
(o)Hornwort
(o)Iris
(o)Ivy
(o)Jacobs Ladder
(o)Lily
(o)Lily Garlic
(o)Lime
(o)Lobelia
(o)Loosestrife
(o)Mallow
(o)Maple
(o)Mares-tail
(o)Marsh Pennywort
(o)Melon (Gourd/Cucumber)
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 3
(o)Mesem-bryanthemum
(o)Mignonette
(o)Milkwort
(o)Mistletoe
(o)Moschatel
Naiad
(o)Nettle
(o)Nightshade
(o)Oleaster
(o)Olive
(o)Orchid 1
(o)Orchid 2
(o)Orchid 3
(o)Orchid 4
(o)Parnassus-Grass
(o)Peaflower
(o)Peaflower Clover 1
(o)Peaflower Clover 2
(o)Peaflower Clover 3
(o)Peaflower Vetches/Peas
Peony
(o)Periwinkle
Pillwort
Pine
(o)Pink 1
(o)Pink 2
Pipewort
(o)Pitcher-Plant
(o)Plantain
(o)Pondweed
(o)Poppy
(o)Primrose
(o)Purslane
Rannock Rush
(o)Reedmace
(o)Rockrose
(o)Rose 1
(o)Rose 2
(o)Rose 3
(o)Rose 4
(o)Rush
(o)Rush Woodrushes
(o)Saint Johns Wort
Saltmarsh Grasses
(o)Sandalwood
(o)Saxifrage
 

WILD FLOWER FAMILY
PAGE MENU 4
Seaheath
(o)Sea Lavender
(o)Sedge Rush-like
(o)Sedges Carex 1
(o)Sedges Carex 2
(o)Sedges Carex 3
(o)Sedges Carex 4
(o)Spindle-Tree
(o)Spurge
(o)Stonecrop
(o)Sundew
(o)Tamarisk
Tassel Pondweed
(o)Teasel
(o)Thyme 1
(o)Thyme 2
(o)Umbellifer 1
(o)Umbellifer 2
(o)Valerian
(o)Verbena
(o)Violet
(o)Water Fern
(o)Waterlily
(o)Water Milfoil
(o)Water Plantain
(o)Water Starwort
Waterwort
(o)Willow
(o)Willow-Herb
(o)Wintergreen
(o)Wood-Sorrel
(o)Yam
(o)Yew

Ivydene Gardens Garden Design:
Broad Design

Garden Design Pages

Introduction
Site Map
Before You Start
Designing for a Purpose
Questionnaire
Site Survey
The Design Itself
Broad Design *
Low Maintenance Style
Cottage Garden Style
Wildlife Garden Style
Japanese Garden Style
Hard and Soft Landscaping
Detailed Design
The Soil
Changing the Microclimate
Plant Selection
The Colour Wheel
Plant Quantities
Companion Planting
Bibliography and further Design Concepts

 

 

See Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines to aid your use of this website.

 

Designing the broad relationship between the size and location of each area in the garden involves the following concepts:

Scale,
Style,
Hard/Soft Landscaping Proportion,
Mystery,
Area Shape, and
Focal Points.

Scale

To create a design with the scale in relation to the house, you should create a square grid on another layer of your drawing, with the sides being the width of a prominent feature of the house located during the site survey, for example the width of french windows. On another layer, create a grid of the diagonals of those squares. Each layer can be drawn separately, or kept on individual overlays.

 

golfcourse1aI suspect that a component of this golfcourse designed for beginners may be slightly out of scale!!

 

 

 

 

Style

Using a multiple of the units you have worked out, you can assign areas of the garden to each of the required purposes (from the Designing for a Purpose questionnaire), using only one garden style to provide unity within the garden.

 

irishparamedics1aI suspect that these Irish Paramedics may be trying to save the life of the patient, but as with garden style, it just might be neccessary for the patient to be only 1 unit also!!

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Page...

Next Page for Low Maintenance Style or
Next Page for Cottage Garden Style or
Next Page for Wildlife Garden Style or
Next Page for Japanese Garden Style

or if you wish to link your selection of plants to your garden style, you might find the following rows useful:-

 

 

The following table shows the linkages for the information about the plants
described in Sanders' Encyclopedia of Gardening in The Gardeners' Golden Treasury, revised by A. G. L Hellyer F.L.S, Editor of 'Amateur Gardening', (thirty-first impression of original published in 1895) was published in 1960 by W. H. & L. Collingridge Limited,
between:-

 

 

 

STAGE 1 GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY

Private Garden Design:-
What is your Budget and What are the purposes for your garden?
Designing for a purpose:
Areas which require answers before answering your Designing for a Purpose Questionaire.
Then, do the Site Survey with Photographs, before
putting the Current Garden Design on paper or in your computer.
Using the Broad Design elements of Scale, which Garden Style to use:-
Low Maintenance Garden Style,
Cottage Garden Style,
Wildlife Garden Style or
Japanese Garden Style and the
Hard and Soft Landscaping elements, create the Broad Proposed Design.
Then, the Detailed Design of each Hard Landscaping item
followed by the Soft Landscaping elements: The Soil,
changing the Microclimate; and the
Plant Selection is influenced by
the Colour Wheel, with
Plant Quantities determined by time to establish versus width between
plants and Companion Planting will provide helpful neighbouring plants
or
Click on text in cells below to jump to that page describing that data
.

 

 

Container
Gardening at my work-place

 

<----

 

Yes

 

Do you want to garden and grow plants?

 

No

 

---->

Cannot be bothered.
I am too busy.
My kids, rabbits or dog would destroy the garden.
Too many weeds to control.
Not allowed plants at work.

 

 

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Potted
House-plant


<----
|
|
v


No Gar-den

At Home with Gard-ening Area


Yes


---->

Balcony Garden or Roof Garden


Yes


---->

Grow flowers for flower arranging and vegetables on Balcony Garden or Roof Garden

 

Conservatory Gardening

|
<--
|

 

 

 

 


No

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stovehouse for Tropical Plants

|
<--

 

 

 

 

Outside Garden
.
.
v

 

 

 

 

 

You need to know the following:-

1. How much time per week are you prepared to look after your garden or prepared to pay someone else to do it for you?

2. How much are you are prepared to spend on creating your garden and then on its maintenance for its feeding and replacement of its plants and hard landscaping?

3. In order for you to go into your garden, there must be mystery in it, so that from any position in the house you cannot see all the garden, otherwise you will not be tempted to go out into it.

4. You must decide what garden style you are going to use THROUGHOUT the garden and make sure of using 3. the mystery in it as well.

5. What plants do you want to keep in your existing garden and incorporate into your new garden?

6. What Human Problems do you have and what Site Problems are there?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A) Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers List leads onto the
B) Bee Pollinated Bloom in Month galleries and
C) extra Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers.


<----

Human Prob-lems


---->

Blind,
Deaf,
in a Wheelchair, or
you cannot bend easily

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Garden Style, which takes into account the Human Problems above

 

 

 

 

 

Classic Mixed Style


<----

Medit-erran-ean Style


<----

Cottage Garden Style


<----


<----

.
.
.
v


---->

Natur-alistic Style


---->

Formal English Garden

 

 

 

 

 

Meadow and Corn-field


<----


<----

.
.
.
v


---->

Paving and Gravel inland,
Coastal Conditions near the sea, Seashore with shingle/sand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Problem Sites within your chosen Garden Style from the above

 

 

 

 

 

Exposure to Wind


<----

Excess Shade


<----

Exce-ssively Dry Shade


<----


<----

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Exce-ssively Hot, Sunny and Dry Site is suitable for Drought Resistant Plants


---->

Excessively Wet Soil - especially when caused by poor drainage

Control of Pests (Aphids, Rabbits, Deer, Mice, Mole, Snails) / Disease by Companion Planting in Garden


<----

Whether your Heavy Clay or Light Sandy / Chalk Soil is excessively Alkaline (limy) / Acidic or not, then there is an Action Plan for you to do with your soil, which will improve its texture to make its structure into a productive soil instead of it returning to being just sand, chalk, silt or clay.


<----

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
v


---->

Problems caused by builders:- 1. Lack of soil on top of builders rubble in garden of just built house.
2. Clay soil of Garden slopes towards house with no drainage of this rainwater by the house wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

In planning your beds for your garden, before the vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman planting is inserted into your soft landscaping plan, the following is useful to consider:-
1. The ground plan usually depends upon 1 or more unalterable existing features. The position of the doors of the house will dicate the positions of paths, the shortest route to the kitchen may indicate the best place for a paved area for eating and drinking out of doors, or the kept trees/shrubs may indicate what garden style is used.
2. Rules of Proportion -
A. A border should be roughly 1/2 as wide as the hedge or wall behind it.
B. The proportion of planted areas to paved or turfed areas should be 1/3 to 2/3, or a 1/4 to 3/4, not 1/2 and 1/2.
C. Within a bed or border, unless a 2-dimensional pattern on the ground is the objective, the height and bulk of the plants should be varied to avoid monotony; it is particularly important to provide strong planting, in terms of either height or bulk or both, at either end of a long bed.
D. The ground surface provides a background to the plants that is as important as the hedges, walls or fences that surround it. Grass is perhaps the most satisfying carpet to use, the cool green forming a restful antidote to the dancing colours of the flowers. Use different coloured pea-shingle inside Cedar Gravel for people in wheelchairs, or infirm in their legs or who suffer from Hay Fever.

 

Reasons for stopping infilling of Sense of Fragrance section on 28/07/2016 at end of Sense of Fragrance Page.
From September 2017 will be creating the following new pages on Sense of Fragrance using Scented Flora of the World by Roy Genders.
ISBN 0 7090 5440 8:-

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

After you have selected your vertical hard-landscaping framework and the vertical speciman plants for each bed or border, you will need to infill with plants taking the following into account:-

 

 

 

Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark 1, 2, 3
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil 1
, 2, 3, 4
Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Sandy Soil 1
, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3
Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves 1, 2, 3
Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves 1, 2
Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit 1, 2, 3
Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers 1, 2
Night-scented Flowering Plants 1, 2
Scented Aquatic Plants.
Plants with Scented Fruits.
Plants with Scented Roots 1, 2
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.
Scented Cacti and Succulents.
Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell 1, 2

Flower Perfume Group:-
Miscellaneous Group with scents - Balm, Brandy, Cedar, Cloying, Cowslip, Cucumber, Damask Rose, Daphne, Exotic, Freesia, Fur-like, Gardenia, Hay-like, Heliotrope, Honeysuckle, Hops, Hyacinth, Incense-like, Jasmine, Laburnham, Lilac, Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette, Mint, Mossy, Muscat, Muscatel, Myrtle-like, Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg, Piercing, Primrose, Pungent, Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras, Seductive, Slight, Soft, Stephanotis, Sulphur, Starch, Sweet, Sweet-briar, Tea-rose, Treacle and Very Sweet.

Flower Perfume Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.
Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.
Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.
Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.
 

Flower Perfume Group:-
Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.
Honey Group.
Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint
Sulphur and
Urinous.

Leaf Perfume Group:-
Turpentine Group.
Camphor and Eucalyptus Group.
Mint Group.
Sulphur Group.
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Heavy Group.
Aromatic Group.
Violet Group.
Rose Group.
Lemon Group.
Fruit-scented Group.
Animal-scented Group.
Honey Group.

Scent of Wood, Bark and Roots Group:-
Aromatic Group.
Turpentine Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Stale Perspiration Group.

 

Scent of Fungi Group:-
Indoloid Group.
Aminoid Group.
Sulphur Group.
Aromatic Group.
Rose Group.
Violet Group.
Fruit Group.
Animal Group.
Honey Group

Sense of Sight

Emotion of
Hot /Cool; Calm / Agitated


<----

Emotion of
Low-key / High Key


<----


<----

.
.
.
v


---->

Emotion of
Inviting
/ For-bidding


---->

Emotion of Intell-ectual versus Emotion-al

Sense of Touch

Sense of Taste

Sense of Sound

 

 

 

 

 

 

|
v

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY for
lists of plants of 1 plant type for 1 cultivation requirement

 

 

 

 

 

|
v

 

STAGE 1

It would be useful if when you decide to change your garden that you use a uniform garden style throughout your garden and the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY aims to provide pointers.
The new pages (April 2016) in the gallery will have a suitable list of plants on each page (as that plant gets further detailed in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY), then each row containing that plant name in the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY will also be updated. I aim to input details of plants starting with A in alphabetical order to Z.

 

STAGE 2

INFILL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY provides lists of plants of 1 plant type for 1 cultivation requirement.


STAGE 2 INFILL PLANT INDEX GALLERY

Click on text in cells below to jump to that page detailing
those infill plants of that plant type for that Cultivation requirement.

Plant Type
 

 

Alpines for Rock Garden (See Rock Garden Plant Flowers)

Alpine Shrubs and Conifers

The Alpine Meadow
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

The Alpine Border

Alpine Plants for a Purpose

The Alpines that Dislike Lime

Alpines and Walls
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3

Alpines and Paving

Sink and Trough gardens

Aquatic
(Water Plants) for

Anti-erosion Riverbank

Marginal Plants (Bog Garden Plants)

Oxy-genating Weeds

Water Lilies

Floating Plants

Waterside Plants
and Plants for Dry Margins next to a Pond

Wildlife Pond Plants

Annual for

----------------

Plants for Cut Flowers in
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Exposed Sites

Sheltered Sites with Green-house Annuals from 1916

Extra Poor Soil with Half-Hardy Annuals from 1916

Very Rich Soil with Biennials from 1916

Gap-filling in Mixed Borders with Hardy Annuals from 1916

Patio Containers

Cut Flowers Page 1
Page 2 Everlasting Flowers with Red Flowers from 1916

Attracting beneficial insects

Scent / Fragrance with Annuals for Cool or Shady Places from 1916

Low-allergen Gardens for Hay Fever Sufferers

Annual Plant Pairing Ideas

Low-Growing Annuals

Medium-Growing Annuals

Tall-Growing Annuals with White Flowers from 1916

Black or Brown Flowers

Blue to Purple Flowers

Green Flowers with Annuals and Biennials from 1916

Red to Pink Flowers
Page 1
Page 2

White Flowers

Yellow or Orange Flowers

Decorative Foliage

Moist Soil

Shade

House-plants with Yellow Flowers from 1916

Edging Beds

Hanging Baskets

Vining Annuals

 

Bedding for

Spring Bedding

Summer Bedding

Autumn/ Winter Bedding

Bedding for Light Sandy Soil

Bedding for Acid Soil

Bedding for Chalky Soil

Bedding for Clay Soil

Black Flowers

Blue Flowers

Orange Flowers

Pink Flowers

Long Flowering

Coloured Leaves

Attractive to Wildlife including Bees, Butterflies and Moths

Purple Flowers

Red Flowers

White Flowers

Yellow Flowers

Multi-Coloured Flowers

Aromatic Foliage or Scented Flowers

Bedding Plant Use

Flowers with 2 Petals

Flowers with 3 Petals

Flowers with
4 Petals

Flowers with 5 Petals

Flowers with 6 Petals

Flowers with more than 6 Petals

Use in Hanging Baskets

Flower Simple Shape

Shape of
Stars

Shape of
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

Shape of
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

Shape of
Trumpets and Funnels

Shape of
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

Use in Pots and Troughs

Flower Elaborated Shape

Shape of
Tubes, Lips and Lobes

Shape of
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

Shape of
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

 

Use in
Screening

Use in
Window Boxes

Shape of
Standards, Wings and Keels

Shape of
Discs and Florets

Shape of
Pin-Cushions and Tufts

Shape of
Rosettes, Buttons and Pompons

Cut Flowers

Use in Bedding Out

Use in
Filling In

Biennial for

Cottage and Other Gardens

Cut Flower with Biennials for Rock Work from 1916

Patio Containers with Biennials for Pots in Greenhouse / Conservatory

Beneficial to Wildlife with Purple and Blue Flowers from 1916

Scent with Biennials for Sunny Banks or Borders from 1916

 

 

Bulb for
--------------
Explanation Intro to Bulbs
--------------
725 Blue, White, Yellow, Unusual Colour, or Red-Purple-Pink flowering Bulbs in each month they flower.

Indoor Bulbs for
December
January
February

Indoor Bulbs for
March
April
May

Indoor
Bulbs for
June
July
August

Indoor Bulbs for September
October
November

Bulbs in Window-boxes

Bulbs in the Border

Bulbs naturalised in Grass

Plant Bloom Dec-Jan
Feb-Mar

Plant Bloom
Apr-May
Jun-Aug

Plant Bloom
Sep-Oct
Nov-Dec

Plant Bloom Smallest of Gardens

Bulbs for the Bulb Frame

Bulbs in the Woodland Garden

Bulbs in the Rock Garden

Bulbs in Green-house or Stove

Achimenes, Alocasias, Amorpho-phalluses, Arisaemas, Arums, Begonias, Bomareas, Caladiums

Clivias,
Colocasias, Crinums, Cyclamens, Cyrt-anthuses, Eucharises, Urceocharis, Eurycles

Freesias, Gloxinias, Hae-manthus, Hipp-eastrums

Lachenalias, Nerines, Lycorises, Pen-cratiums, Hymen-ocallises, Richardias, Sprekelias, Tuberoses, Vallotas, Watsonias, Zephy-ranthes

Bulbs in Bowls

Bulbs in the Alpine House

Hardy Bulbs

Aconitum, Allium, Alstroe-meria, Anemone

Amaryllis, Antheri-cum, Antholy-zas, Apios, Arisaema, Arum, Aspho-deline,

Aspho-delus, Belam-canda, Bloomeria, Brodiae, Bulbo-codium

Calochorti, Cyclo-bothras, Camassia, Colchicum, Con-vallaria,
Forcing Lily of the Valley, Corydalis, Crinum, Crosmia, Montbretia , Crocus

Cyclamen, Dicentra, Dierama, Eranthis, Eremurus, Erythrnium, Eucomis

Fritillaria, Funkia, Galanthus, Galtonia, Gladiolus, Hemero-callis

Hyacinth, Hyacinths in Pots,
Scilla, Puschkinia, Chionodoxa, Chionoscilla, Muscari

Iris,
Kniphofia, Lapeyrousia, Leucojum

Lilium,

Lilium in Pots, Malvastrum, Merendera, Milla, Narcissus, Narcissi in Pots

Orni-thogalum, Oxalis, Paeonia, Ran-unculus, Romulea, Sanguin-aria,
Stern-bergia,
Schi-zostylis, Teco-philaea, Trillium

Tulip,
Zephy-ranthus

Half-Hardy Bulbs

Acidanthera, Albuca, Alstroemeri, Andro-stephium, Bassers, Boussing-aultias, Bravoas, Cypellas, Dahlias, Galaxis,
Geis-sorhizas, Hesper-anthas

Gladioli, Ixias,
Sparaxises, Babianas, Morphixias, Tritonias

Ixiolirions, Moraeas, Orni-thogalums, Oxalises, Phaedra-nassas,
Pan-cratiums, Tigridias, Zephyr-anthes, Cooperias

Bulbs for Bedding

Plant Bedding Spring
Summer

Climber 3 sector Vertical Plant System with flowers in
Jan,
Feb,
Mar,
Apr,
May 1, 2
Jun,
Jul,
Aug,
Sep,
Oct,
Nov,
Dec

----------

Choosing the right Shrub or Climber

1a.
The Base -
Base of Wall Plants

1b.
Annuals

1c.
Herbs and Vegetables

1d.
Cut flowers, Cut Foliage

1e.
Scented flower or foliage

1f.
Foliage use only

 

2a. 1,2,3,4
The Prime - Wall Shrubs

2b.
Fruit trees

3a.
The Higher Reaches -
House-wall Ramblers

3b. 1,2
Non-House-Wall - Climbing Twiners

3c.
Non-House-Wall - Self-clinging Climbers

Raised Bed for Wheelchair Users

Plants for Wildlife-Use as well

Fastest Covering

Least protruding growth when fan-trained

1, 2
Evergreen

Use as
Hedge

Exposed Positions

Use as Groundcover

1,2
Ornam-ental Fruit

Scented Flowers

1, 2
Autumn Foliage Colour

Winter Bark

Winter and Early Spring Flowers

Summer Colour or Shape of Foliage

Edible Fruit

Needs Conservatory or Greenhouse

Large Pots and Containers

Cut Flowers

Attractive to Bees

Climber - Simple Flower Shape

anthericumcfloliliagofoord1a
Stars

geraniumflocineremuballerina1a1
Bowls, Cups and Saucers

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14k1a1
Globes, Goblets and Chalices

acantholimoncfloglumaceumfoord2
Trumpets and Funnels

phloxflotsubulatatemiskaming
Salverform

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14q1
Bells, Thimbles and Urns

 

Climber - Elaborated Flower Shape

prunellaflotgrandiflora
Tubes, Lips and Straps

aquilegiacfloformosafoord
Slippers, Spurs and Lockets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14u1a
Hats, Hoods and Helmets

berberisdarwiniiflower10h3a14v1a
Standards, Wings and Keels

brachyscomecflorigidulakevock
Disks and Florets

androsacecforyargongensiskevock
Pin-cushions, Tufts, Petal-less and Cushions

armeriaflomaritimakevock
Umbels, Buttons and Pompoms

 

Essential Annuals The 100 Best for Design and Cultivation. Text by Elizabeth Murray. Photography by Derek Fell. ISBN 0-517-66177-2, provides data about annuals.

 

 

 

STAGE 3

I place the plant into ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY into

A row in the data table on the right of the page for the respective
Plant Type in the All Plants Index Gallery:-

then I place the Plant into ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY into

 

 

 

A row in the data table in the middle for the respective 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery in the All Plants Index Gallery with the first column stating the same Botanical Name as the corresponding row in the table above.
It will also state the Plant Combinations for each plant from The Ulimate Visual Guide to Successful Plant Harmony - The Encyclopedia of Planting Combinations by Tony Lord ISBN 1-55209-623-8

 

 

STAGE 4b

Then, that same row of the table in the row above is inserted into either data table in the 12 FOLIAGE COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY page for each month that this plant has foliage:-

There is a link back to the page in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY where this plant is put into its Plant Type

 

STAGE 4a

Then, that same row of the table in the row above is inserted into either data table in the 12 BLOOM COLOURS PER MONTH INDEX GALLERY page for each month that this plant flowers in:-

There is a link back to the page in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY where this plant is put into its Plant Type

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

As a further refinement, you can use the following about the flowers within

STAGE 4c

Then, that same row of the table in the row above is inserted into either data table in the CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY page for one of the following:-

.

.

Flower Shape:-

Number of Petals:-

Flower Shape - Simple:-

Flower Shape - Elaborated:-

Flower Shape - Natural Arrangements:-

.

.

In addition to these 7 galleries, there are links to the Other Plant Photo Galleries in the top right menu table like Bulb , which have plant descriptions accessed by clicking a flower thumbnail in its flower comparison page. Click the respective flower colour - like - to change page to that flower colour comparison page. Then, you can also choose these other plants.

.

.

Finally, you might be advised to check that the adjacent plants to the one you have chosen for that position in a flower bed are suitable; by checking the entry in Companion Planting - like clicking A page for checking Abies - and Pest Control page if you have a pest to control in this part of the flower bed.

 

STAGE 4c

Then, that same row of the table in the row above is inserted into either data table in the CULTIVATION, POSITION, USE GALLERY page for one of the following:-

Cultivation Requirements of Plant:-

  • Outdoor /Garden Cultivation
  • Indoor / House Cultivation
  • Cool Green-house Cultivation with artificial heating in the Winter
  • Conservatory Cultivation with heating throughout the year
  • Stovehouse Cultivation with heating throughout the year for Tropical Plants

Sun Aspect:-

Soil Type:-

Soil Moisture:-

Position for Plant:-

Use of Plant:-

There is a link back to the page in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY where this plant is put into its Plant Type

 

STAGE 4d

Then, that same row of the table in the row above is inserted into either data table in the SHAPE, FORM GALLERY page for one of the following:-

Plant Foliage:-

Shrub, Tree Shape:-

Conifer Cone

Form:-

 

There is a link back to the page in the ALL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY where this plant is put into its Plant Type

 

Plant Solutions 1000+ suggestions for every garden situation by Nigel Colborn ISBN 13:978 0 00 719312 7, provides most of the plants for the INFILL PLANTS INDEX GALLERY.
The planning a Rose Garden chapter from Rose Gardens by Jane Fearnley-Whitingstall ISBN 0 7011 3344 9 and Plant Solutions by Nigel Colborn provides information for the GARDEN STYLE INDEX GALLERY.

 

 

 

Site design and content copyright ©December 2006. Page structure amended October 2012. Garden Design Summary added to each page April 2017. Chris Garnons-Williams.
 

DISCLAIMER: Links to external sites are provided as a courtesy to visitors. Ivydene Horticultural Services are not responsible for the content and/or quality of external web sites linked from this site.  

 

The 3 rows below provide a

Garden Design Work-flow Diagram

indicating which pages in this site help with each respective section:-

shortiaforuniflora1a1

Shortia uniflora

 

 

When you buy a house, you would not paint your toilet in a Gaugin Style with many colours without thinking that you wanted Magnolia paint colour in the rest of the house, because it would look out of place.

This design process hopefully persuades you to think as carefully about your use and enjoyment of the garden as you do about your lounge, kitchen and bedroom and prepare plans that will be acceptable to the whole family.

The most important design consideration is who and how long per week is maintenance on the garden going to be done. One hour-garden by Joanna Smith book helps in this part of the design process.

If you decide that you would like to redesign all or only a part of your garden

then ----->

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

otherwise

It might be useful to read the following pages in this Design Topic:

This page followed by these:-
Introduction

Before You Start
Designing for a Purpose
Questionnaire
Site Survey

|
|
V

 

 

 

 

You may decide to simply add more plants to your existing beds

like plants to Rock Gardens using
Rock Plant Flowers 53
...Rock Plant Photos Galleries.

|
|
V

Then, you can decide on the Garden Style that you wish to use in your garden, so these pages in this Design Topic may help:

The Design Itself
Broad Design
Low Maintenance Style
Cottage Garden Style
Wildlife Garden Style
Japanese Garden Style

Additional Garden Design Concepts have been written using the beds at Wisley to provide examples:-

Using the Mixed Border, Jubilee Rose Garden and Bowes-Lyon Rose Garden in the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Garden at Wisley for examples, I am still creating The Mixed Borders Garden Design Topic . The Mixed Borders Garden Design topic may help you in planning your garden, especially if you decide to show your garden to the public - i.e Make plant labels visible in your garden to aid your own plant sales.

RHS Mixed Borders

as well as from

Garden Style

|
|
V

In choosing your style, there are other considerations to take into account like

If you suffer from hay fever, then bee-pollinated plants and very little grass would be useful

|
|
V

 

 

Fragrant Plants adds the use of another of your 5 senses in your garden:-
Sense of Fragrance from Roy Genders

Fragrant Plants:-
Trees and Shrubs with Scented Flowers.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Leaves.

Trees and Shrubs with Aromatic Bark.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for an
Acid Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented Flowers for a
Chalky or Limestone Soil
.

Shrubs bearing Scented leaves for a
Sandy Soil
.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Flowers.

Herbaceous Plants with Scented Leaves.

Annual and Biennial Plants with Scented Flowers or Leaves.

Bulbs and Corms with Scented Flowers.

Scented Plants of Climbing and Trailing Habit.

Winter-flowering Plants with Scented Flowers.

Night-scented Flowering Plants.

Scented Aquatic Plants.

Plants with Scented Fruits.

Plants with Scented Roots.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Wood.

Trees and Shrubs with Scented Gums.

Scented Cacti and Succulents.

Plants bearing Flowers or Leaves of Unpleasant Smell.
 

 

Flower Perfume Group:-

Indoloid Group.

Aminoid Group with scent - Hawthorn.

Heavy Group with scents -
Jonquil and
Lily.

Aromatic Group with scents - Almond,
Aniseed, Balsamic,
Carnation, Cinnamon, Clove,
Spicy and
Vanilla.

Violet Group.

Rose Group.

Lemon Group with scent -
Verbena.

Fruit-scented Group with scents -
Apricot,
Fruity,
Green Apple,
Orange, Pineapple,
Ripe Apple , Ripe Banana and
Ripe Plum.

Animal-scented Group with scents -
Cat,
Dog,
Ferret,
Fox,
Goat,
Human Perspiration,
Musk,
Ripe Apple and
Tom Cat.

Honey Group.

Unpleasant Smell Group with scents -
Animal,
Fetid,
Fishy,
Foxy,
Fur-like,
Garlic,
Hemlock,
Manure,
Nauseating,
Perspiration,
Petrol,
Putrid,
Rancid,
Sickly,
Skunk,
Stale Lint,
Sulphur and
Urinous.

Miscellaneous Group with scents -
Balm,
Brandy,
Cedar,
Cloying,
Cowslip,
Cucumber,
Damask Rose, Daphne,
Exotic,
Freesia,
Fur-like,
Gardenia,
Hay-like,
Heliotrope, Honeysuckle,
Hops,
Hyacinth,
Incense-like, Jasmine,
Laburnham,
Lilac,
Lily of the Valley, Meadowsweet, Mignonette,
Mint,
Mossy,
Muscat,
Muscatel,
Myrtle-like,
Newly Mown Hay, Nutmeg,
Piercing,
Primrose,
Pungent,
Resinous, Sandalwood, Sassafras,
Seductive,
Slight,
Soft,
Stephanotis,
Sulphur,
Starch,
Sweet,
Sweet-briar,
Tea-rose,
Treacle and
Very Sweet.

Then, view these Garden Design Pages in this order or any order you want


Hard and Soft Landscaping
Detailed Design
The Soil
Changing the Microclimate
Plant Selection
The Colour Wheel
Plant Quantities
Companion Planting
Bibliography and further Design Concepts

before

choosing 1 of these different Plant selection Methods:-

 

1. Choose a plant from 1 of 53 flower colours in the Colour Wheel Gallery.

 

2. Choose a plant from 1 of 12 flower colours in each month of the year from 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery.

 

3. Choose a plant from 1 of 6 flower colours per month for each type of plant:-

Aquatic
Bedding
Bulb
Climber
Conifer
Deciduous Shrub
Deciduous Tree
Evergreen Perennial
Evergreen Shrub
Evergreen Tree
Hedging
Herbaceous Perennial
Herb
Odds and Sods
Rhododendron
Rose
Soft Fruit
Top Fruit
Wild Flower

 

4. Choose a plant from its Flower Shape:-

Shape, Form
Index

Flower Shape

 

5. Choose a plant from its foliage:-

Bamboo
Conifer
Fern
Grass
Vegetable

 

6. There are 6 Plant Selection Levels including Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers in
Plants Topic.

 

7. Your chosen Garden Style then changes your Plant Selection Process:-

Garden Style
...Infill Plants
...12 Bloom Colours per Month Index
...
12 Foliage Colours per Month Index
...All Plants Index
...Cultivation, Position, Use Index
...Shape, Form
Index

I have moved on in March 2016 to create the Garden Style and the other design galleries for the New Plant Selection Process number 7.

Bee-Pollinated Plants information in this website using the Bee-Pollinated Bloom in Month Colour Wheel Gallery:-

Besides the plants in the
British Floral Sources of importance to Honey Bees
and
Bee Pollinated Plants for Hay Fever Sufferers
the following 3 sets of Bee-pollinated plants are suitable for Hay-fever Sufferers; except for the 2 grasses in the second list:-

  • The Bee-pollinated Bloom in Month gallery compares the photos from 13 flower colours per month for many plants from the other Galleries, by clicking on the 1 in the relevant Flower per month Colour in the Colour Wheel down on the right of its pages,
  • the Bee-pollinated Index Gallery provides the tabular index of another 264 plants with the relevant colour in that respective month:-
    • 51 ANNUALS
    • 2 ANNUAL - VEGETABLE
    • 4 AQUATIC PLANTS
    • 11 BIENNIALS
    • 21 BULBS, CORMS, OR RHIZOMES
    • 4 CLIMBERS
    • 31 DECIDUOUS SHRUBS
    • 26 DECIDUOUS TREES
    • 9 EVERGREEN PERENNIALS
    • 22 EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 2 EVERGREEN TREES
    • 2 GRASSES which cause hayfever
    • 4 SEMI-EVERGREEN SHRUBS
    • 66 HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
    • 9 PERENNIAL HERBS
      followed by
  • Click on these extra bee-pollinated plant names:-

 

Soils and their Treatment
(from Colour All The Year In My Garden: A selection of choice varieties - annuals, biennials, perennials, bulbs, climbers and trees and shrubs - that will give a continuity of colour in the garden throughout the year. Edited by C.H. Middleton. Gardening Book from Ward, Lock & Co published in 1938, provides plant data for a calendar of plants in bloom throughout the year and for those in the smallest garden.)


The perfect soil for general use should be composed of 8.3% lime, 16.6% humus, 25% clay and 50% sand. Soil containing constituents in these ratios will rarely be found, but many loams will not be far from the ideal, and with a little judicious improvement will furnish a compost in which most plants will thrive.

Soil Improvement
Water-logged soil will not allow the continual life of the majority of plants. Very sandy soil so unretentive of moisture is equally hopeless. What most plants require is a soil which, while efficiently drained and containing within a few feet of the surface no body of stagnant water, shall yet be of such a texture and shall include a sufficient proportion of organic material as to retain for an appreciable time a moderate degree of water. If the soil is naturally very heavy, that is to say, if it consists very largely of clay, and especially if it rests at a comparatively shallow depth below the surface on an almost impervious layer, it is almost certain to be more or less water-logged. And it is necessary in such a case to dig it deeply and to provide adequate drainage, and at the same time to lighten the upper layers of the soil by the addition of dsand, leaf-mould, and organic manures such as stable manure (I prefer cow manure since it contains no weed seeds). In a similar way very light, sandy soils should be improved by the liberal addition of clay, fibrous loam such as is obtained from the top spit of meadow-land, leaf-mould, and cow or pig manure. These latter, which, in the case of the heavy soils, serve to keep open the clay which would tend otherwise to form a solid block, help, in the case of sandy soils, to bind them together, and enable them to retain a greatly increased volume of water.
In the case of practically all soils one of the first things to do, over and above such special measures as have been suggested, is to trench the ground or to dig it deeply.

THE 2 EUREKA EFFECT PAGES FOR UNDERSTANDING SOIL AND HOW PLANTS INTERACT WITH IT OUT OF 15,000:-


Explanation of Structure of this Website with User Guidelines Page for those photo galleries with Photos
(of either ones I have taken myself or others which have been loaned only for use on this website from external sources)

 

or

 

when I do not have my own or ones from mail-order nursery photos , then from March 2016, if you want to start from the uppermost design levels through to your choice of cultivated and wildflower plants to change your Plant Selection Process then use the following galleries:-

  • Create and input all plants known by Amateur Gardening inserted into their Sanders' Encyclopaedia from their edition published in 1960 (originally published by them in 1895) into these
    • Stage 1 - Garden Style Index Gallery,
      then
    • Stage 2 - Infill Plants Index Gallery being the only gallery from these 7 with photos (from Wikimedia Commons) ,
      then
    • Stage 3 - All Plants Index Gallery with each plant species in its own Plant Type Page followed by choice from Stage 4a, 4b, 4c and/or 4d REMEMBERING THE CONSTRAINTS ON THE SELECTION FROM THE CHOICES MADE IN STAGES 1 AND 2
    • Stage 4a - 12 Bloom Colours per Month Index Gallery,
    • Stage 4b - 12 Foliage Colours per Month Index Gallery with
    • Stage 4c - Cultivation, Position, Use Index Gallery and
    • Stage 4d - Shape, Form Index Gallery
    • Unfortunately, if you want to have 100's of choices on selection of plants from 1000's of 1200 pixels wide by up to 16,300 pixels in length webpages, which you can jump to from almost any of the pages in these 7 galleries above, you have to put up with those links to those choices being on
      • the left topic menu table,
      • the header of the middle data table and on
      • the page/index menu table on the right of every page of those galleries.

There are other pages on Plants which bloom in each month of the year in this website:-

 

 

item7a item7a item8 item8 item9 item9 item11 item11 item22 item22 item23 item23 item24 item24 item25 item25 item27 item27